scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Showing papers in "The English Historical Review in 2003"





Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Martin Daunton as discussed by the authors examines the complex financial relationship between the state and its citizens and argues that the process of fiscal containment resulted in a high level of trust in the financial rectitude of the government and in the equity of the tax system.
Abstract: Martin Daunton’s major study of the politics of taxation in the ‘long nineteenth century’ examines the complex financial relationship between the state and its citizens. Around 1800, taxes stood at 20 per cent of national income; by the outbreak of the First World War, they had fallen to less than half of their previous level. The process of fiscal containment resulted in a high level of trust in the financial rectitude of the government and in the equity of the tax system, contributing to the political legitimacy of the British state in the second half of the nineteenth century. As a result, the state was able to fund the massive enterprises of war and welfare in the twentieth century. Combining new research with a comprehensive survey of existing knowledge, this lucid and wide-ranging book represents a major contribution to our understanding of Victorian and Edwardian Britain.

76 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Briggs as mentioned in this paper provides a comprehensive survey of early modern witchcraft cases from the Duchy of Lorraine in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on the social context of these cases.
Abstract: 'Much nonsense has been written on this subject', wrote Keith Thomas in a famous and influential footnote to his own pioneering chapter on English witchcraft in Religion and the Decline of Magic (1971). In similar vein, Robin Briggs remarks near the st art of this magnificent new survey that 'common assumptions about the subject tend to have one very marked feature in common, which is that they are hopelessly wrong' (p. 9). The concept of witchcraft is notoriously slippery; scholarly research over the past quarter-century has barely changed the received ideas of most people. Some of what reputable and intelligent scholars have contributed to the subject has proved at best untypical of the wider witchcraft phenomenon, at worst seriously misleading. Robin Briggs has devoted many years to meticulous examination of a large body of trial records of witchcraft cases from the Duchy of Lorraine in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In this book he has brought the insights from that research to a synt hesis and survey of the social context of all early modern witchcraft cases in western Europe and New England. The resulting book will have a deeply corrosive effect on all sorts of traditional wisdom about the subject of witchcraft and society.

65 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The second volume of the Yale University Press series, The New Economic History of Britain this article, provides a continuum of scholarly surveys of the British economy from early times to the present, but in a more accessible form: without the usual impedimenta of footnotes or endnotes and with an eye to a less specialist reading market.
Abstract: This volume is the second published in the Yale University Press series, The New Economic History of Britain. The New Economic History will eventually provide a continuum of scholarly surveys of the British economy from early times to the present, but in a more accessible form: that is, without the usual impedimenta of footnotes or endnotes and with an eye to a less specialist reading market. Arguably the timing for such volumes could not be better, and this is particularly the case for the period of this book. Thanks to the recent celebration of the start of the third millenium, interest in the world at the beginning of the second millennium has been correspondingly heightened. It resulted in a series of publications investigating the world around 1000, the most wellknown for Britain being Robert Lacey's and Danny Danziger’s The Year 1000 (Little, Brown; Boston & London, 1999).

55 citations





















Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The English Historical Review (Ehr) as discussed by the authors published a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The English History Review following peer review.
Abstract: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The English Historical Review following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version (Vol.118 (478), Sept. 2003 pp. 912-939) is available online at: http://ehr.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/118/478/912