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Showing papers in "The European Legacy in 2014"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Audrey Kurth Cronin, known for her works on counterterrorism, has written a very timely book that deals with the end of terrorist organizations as mentioned in this paper. Among the possibilities that she considers are catch...
Abstract: Audrey Kurth Cronin, known for her works on counterterrorism, has written a very timely book that deals with the end of terrorist organizations. Among the possibilities that she considers are catch...

144 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: McAteer as mentioned in this paper discusses the effect of Yeats's play Purgatory (1938) in relation to Strindberg's The Ghost Sonata (1907) and evaluates the effect Yeats' play had on the young Samuel Beckett.
Abstract: array of authors and movements which McAteer considers. McAteer’s book will be highly useful to both students of Yeats and Irish literature but also to those interested in the development of modern European drama. The effect of ideas within a historical period is difficult to pin down. Some highly influential ideas are just in the air, everywhere noticeable, but not exactly defined. McAteer tends to be open to the possibility of influence rather than skeptical about influences. But he has on his side the fact that Yeats was no closet dramatist, but an active man of the theatre. His job for many decades was to see how plays could be produced on a real stage. McAteer also tries to show how Yeats, influenced by the socialist ideals of William Morris, came to grips with many major economic and political movements of the early twentieth century. Here I am less convinced by McAteer’s conclusions than his evaluations of literary influences. But McAteer tries with good effect to place in perspective some of the less praiseworthy ideological positions Yeats took near the end of his life. One of McAteer’s best chapters is his next to last one (chap. 8), in which he discusses Yeats’s play Purgatory (1938) in relation to August Strindberg’s The Ghost Sonata (1907), and evaluates the effect Yeats’s play had on the young Samuel Beckett. This book is for the advanced student of Yeats, in that it assumes a basic familiarity with the plays, never mind his poems. To be sure, the main plot lines of the dramas emerge in the discussions of a given Yeats play as compared with the work of a continental dramatist. Though McAteer’s style is dense, requiring close attention, it is largely free of that specialized language I would call “theorese.” This book has copious footnotes, an extensive bibliography, three black-and-white illustrations of stage designs, and a good working index.

122 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Many Americans woke up in January 2011 to discover that Hosni Mubarak, steadfast friend and intractable opponent of forces that threatened American-Israeli interests, had suddenly been recast by me as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Many Americans woke up in January 2011 to discover that Hosni Mubarak, steadfast friend and intractable opponent of forces that threatened American-Israeli interests, had suddenly been recast by me...

100 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Jonathan Warner1

85 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka as mentioned in this paper argue that animal advocacy has hit "roadblocks to progressive change" due to inadequate moral frameworks: a "welfarist" approach, an "ecological" approach and an "environmental" approach.
Abstract: Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka assert that animal advocacy has hit “roadblocks to progressive change” (1) due to inadequate “moral frameworks: a ‘welfarist’ approach, an ‘ecological’ approach, and...

76 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Golden Legend (Legenda Aurea) by Jacobus de Voragine left a profound imprint on the later Middle Ages and was, perhaps, the second most read book as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The Golden Legend (Legenda Aurea) by Jacobus de Voragine left a profound imprint on the later Middle Ages and was, perhaps, the second most read book. The Bible was, of course, the most read. The L...

63 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was Richard Nixon who, if I remember correctly, quite to the point once said: “the dollar is our currency, but your problem, but it is not our problem.
Abstract: It was Richard Nixon who, if I remember correctly, quite to the point once said: “the dollar is our currency, but your problem.” Already from the mid-1920s the US dollar has not been just America’s...

57 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Utopia/Dystopia as discussed by the authors is an impressive collection of essays derived from a seminar at the Helby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton, which is an attempt to think of the terms utopia and dystopia.
Abstract: Utopia/Dystopia is an impressive collection of essays derived from a seminar at the Helby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton. It is an attempt to think of the terms utopia and ...

49 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The ten essays collected here are the output of a workshop on Bakhtin's chronotope theory held at the University of Gent in June 2008 as discussed by the authors, where the editors precirculated drafts and workshopping papers.
Abstract: The ten essays collected here are the output of a workshop on Bakhtin’s chronotope theory held at the University of Gent in June 2008. By precirculating drafts and workshopping papers the editors (...

46 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In his introduction to "Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch" as discussed by the authors, Kant mentions a Dutch innkeeper who named his pub "Perpens" with a drawing of a graveyard under the inscription on the sign.
Abstract: In his introduction to “Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch,” Kant mentions a Dutch innkeeper who named his pub “Perpetual Peace” with a drawing of a graveyard under the inscription on the sign...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 2006, Zipes proposed that memetics might prove useful in understanding the cultural transmission of fairy tales as mentioned in this paper, and suggested that fairy tales resemble genes in that they replicate and ada...
Abstract: In 2006, Jack Zipes proposed that memetics might prove useful in understanding the cultural transmission of fairy tales. Hypothesizing that fairy tales resemble genes in that they replicate and ada...


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals as discussed by the authors is a polemic against the extension of Darwinian premises to the important study of man, and it is a controversy which aims at undermining and disrupting evolutionary naturalism from within.
Abstract: humanities well but also had a solid knowledge of the natural sciences (see Nietzsche and Science, ed. Gregory Moore and Thomas Brobjer, 2004). Johnson rightly insists, against John Richardson’s Nietzsche’s New Darwinism (2004), that Nietzsche’s critique is not based on Darwinism as biological science but rather that it is directed against the philosophical fundaments of Darwin’s ideas (4, 10). Johnson convincingly argues that Nietzsche’s philosophy in his final years was premised on “a fundamental anti-Darwinism” (203). The Darwinian world-view does away with the Christian god as creator of meaning and value. This, for instance, enabled the early Nietzsche in the second of his Untimely Meditations to contend with David Strauss. Whilst the early Nietzsche philosophizes with Darwin, the mature Nietzsche philosophizes against Darwin. Johnson suggests that Nietzsche’s late philosophy can only be understood if his negative criticisms of Darwin are taken into account: he characterizes the mature Nietzsche’s relationship with Darwin as a “creative antagonism,” since Nietzsche regards Darwin as an equal opponent against the resistance of whom his own philosophy can be improved and refined. Johnson acknowledges that apart from Darwin there are in Nietzsche other “significant and productive rivalries—such as with Wagner, Schopenhauer, Plato, Pascal, Spinoza, and Kant” (14). According to Johnson’s reading, the Genealogy of Morals is a controversy which aims at undermining and disrupting evolutionary naturalism from within. He writes that “from within Darwinism, Nietzsche could locate the weak points, the inconsistencies, the metaphysical remnants of the Christian ideal, and his theory of active will meant that he could win for himself a position from which to attack the ascetic ideal” (205, 7). For Nietzsche, Darwinism is an instance of the life-negating ascetic ideal. Therefore, an important project of the Genealogy of Morals is to strengthen lifeaffirming Dionysiac culture against the predominance of nihilism brought about by nineteenth-century natural science. Johnson maintains that the arguments of Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morals function as a polemic (7), stating that it is “a single and sustained polemic against the extension of Darwinian premises to the important study of man” (172). In my view, Johnson correctly claims that in Nietzsche Darwin’s own ideas are primarily under scrutiny and not social-Darwinist ones (4). Nietzsche thinks that they are modern “plebeian” ideas. He accuses Darwin that in his version of naturalism residues of Christian metaphysics and morality are still present and show up in such dichotomous notions as egoism and altruism and also in his use of imagery and metaphors (194–95, 48–50). He also identifies idealist leftovers in Darwin’s materialist theory. Nietzsche is concerned to demonstrate that there are ways to think about nature that deviate in important respects from Darwin’s approach. Nietzschean philosophers create values for science (and for culture as a whole). This means Nietzsche is not identifying science with philosophy. Johnson rightly says that in Nietzsche on Morality (2002), Brian Leiter is incorrect to assume a continuity of science and philosophy in Nietzsche. Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morals is not a “straightforward articulation of the biologist-naturalist preoccupations of the age,” but rather it is “polemical, culturally contingent, anti-Darwinian” (214). Johnson’s book is a significant contribution to the understanding of the role of Darwinism in Nietzsche’s thought and future work in this area will have to engage with it.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Laffan offers an alternative assessment of the intellectual and religious content of Indonesian Islam. But, unlike most scholars extol Indonesian Islam as moderate thanks to the role Sufism has played in shaping its traditions.
Abstract: Whereas most scholars extol Indonesian Islam as moderate thanks to the role Sufism has played in shaping its traditions, Michael Laffan offers an alternative assessment of the intellectual and reli...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Caldwell as mentioned in this paper examines the role of daily life in post-socialist Russia in the context of post-sovietism and post-communism, and proposes a theory of daily living.
Abstract: In her new book Melissa L. Caldwell, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and theorist of daily life in post-socialist Russia, examines the role of the d...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The origin of free will in Western thought has been investigated in this paper, where the authors offer a radically new answer to the much discussed question of the origin of the free will.
Abstract: This short but wide-ranging book has an ambitious project: it offers a radically new answer to the much discussed question of the origin of the idea of free will in Western thought. The book is bas...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Forst's The Right to Justification as discussed by the authors provides an analysis of core liberal democratic institutions and values and identifies their moral basis in practices, including the right to justification, which is a core value of our own.
Abstract: Impressive in its scope and ambition, Rainer Forst’s The Right to Justification provides an analysis of core liberal democratic institutions and values and identifies their moral basis in practices...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Paul Thagard, one of the first philosophers of science to apply the resources of the cognitive sciences to the study of science itself as discussed by the authors, defined cognitive science as inte...
Abstract: Paul Thagard, “among the first philosophers of science to apply the resources of the cognitive sciences to the study of science itself” (Ronald Giere, back cover), defines cognitive science as inte...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Schopenhauer famously disapproved of Kant's Metaphysics of Morals (1797), whose weaknesses he dismissed as Kant's burgeoning senility or "old age" as he put it as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Arthur Schopenhauer famously disapproved of Kant’s Metaphysics of Morals (1797), whose weaknesses he dismissed as Kant’s burgeoning senility or “old age,” as he put it. Published in the Cambridge C...



Journal ArticleDOI
John Shosky1
TL;DR: Most human beings are multi-sensual. But many philosophers and psychologists often give priority to one sense: sight (“Oh, I see your point.”) as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Most human beings are multi-sensual. But many philosophers and psychologists often give priority to one sense: sight (“Oh, I see your point.”). Sight becomes a dominant sense. It is often linked to...

Journal ArticleDOI
James Corby1
TL;DR: The total work of art from the German Gesamtkunstwerk is associated with Wagner's desire for artworks to unify the various modes of artistic expression and form an integral part of the cultural...
Abstract: The “total work of art,” from the German Gesamtkunstwerk, is associated with Wagner’s desire for artworks to unify the various modes of artistic expression and form an integral part of the cultural...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors distinguish political from existential dimensions of irony, consider criticisms of Rorty's ironist (by Michael Williams, J. B. Schneewind, and Jonathan Lear), and then draw on recent work by Lear to argue that Rortys ironist character nevertheless can be recast as an image useful to the self-understanding of contemporary liberal democrats.
Abstract: With Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity (1989) Richard Rorty tries to persuade us that a case for liberalism is better served by historical narrative than by philosophical theory. The liberal ironist is the complex protagonist of Rorty’s anti-foundationalist story. Why does Rorty think irony serves—rather than undermines—commitments to liberal democracy? I distinguish political from existential dimensions of irony, consider criticisms of Rorty’s ironist (by Michael Williams, J. B. Schneewind, Jonathan Lear), and then draw on recent work by Lear to argue that Rorty’s ironist character nevertheless can be recast as an image useful to the self-understanding of contemporary liberal democrats.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: R. Ford Denison as mentioned in this paper proposes major hypotheses for improving agriculture early and forcefully in Darwinian Agriculture: “People looking for agricultural inspiration in nature need to pay more attention.
Abstract: R. Ford Denison proposes major hypotheses for improving agriculture early and forcefully in Darwinian Agriculture: “people looking for agricultural inspiration in nature… need to pay more attention...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Mammone, Godin, and Jenkins as mentioned in this paper provide a multi-dimensional overview of the extreme right in contemporary Europe, with a focus on white supremacists and Islamophobes, and discuss the role of women in these groups.
Abstract: As the editors Andrea Mammone, Emmanuel Godin, and Brian Jenkins state in their introduction, the aim of the book is to provide a multi-dimensional overview of the extreme right in contemporary Eur

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the European Legacy journal, The European Legacy, vol.19, n.5 and has been modified to conform to ADA standards and practices, which has been published since 2003.
Abstract: This article was originally published in the journal, The European Legacy, vol.19, n.5 and has been modified to conform to ADA standards and practices.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Islam through Western Eyes as discussed by the authors, Lyons, with a doctorate in sociology and twenty years' experience as foreign correspondent and editor for Reuters (mainly in the Islamic world), unpacks our...
Abstract: In Islam through Western Eyes, Jonathan Lyons, with a doctorate in sociology and twenty years’ experience as foreign correspondent and editor for Reuters (mainly in the Islamic world), unpacks our ...