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Showing papers in "The Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching in 2020"


Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a 3D immersive computer-based physics educational application that teaches water cycle in nature and precipitation formation concepts through virtual reality and experimental virtual laboratory simulations was designed and developed as part of European Horizon 2020 NEWTON Project.
Abstract: A common problem in many schools is the lack of equipment and materials in their science laboratories due to both limited budget available to the school and high maintenance cost of the lab. The latest technological advancements provide great opportunities for schools to go over the budget and cost issues by using 3D virtual learning environments that support simulations and observations of various experiments. A 3D immersive computer-based Physics educational application that teaches water cycle in nature and precipitation formation concepts through virtual reality and experimental virtual laboratory simulations was designed and developed as part of European Horizon 2020 NEWTON Project. The application was employed and evaluated as part of a case study carried out in a secondary school in Dublin, Ireland. 27 children of age 12-13 years old took part in the study as part of the experimental group. This paper presents an analysis of the user experience and usability results of the developed application, showing a high user experience score. The experimental group students also found the application enjoyable and they would like to take part in such novel-approach lessons more often.

78 citations



Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors studied how 51 fifth-graders' interactions with gaming and mathematics elements in three game-based mathematics iPad apps were associated with student learning, highlighting the importance of a balanced focus and connections between game and mathematics affordances to support student learning.
Abstract: Digital math apps on touch-screen devices have become popular as effective tools to support mathematics learning. Many apps incorporate gaming elements such as points, stars, coins, or storylines to increase student interest and motivation. However, there is limited research regarding the balance of gaming and mathematics elements and how it affects student learning. The purpose of this paper was to understand how 51 fifth-graders’ interactions with gaming and mathematics elements in three game-based mathematics iPad apps were associated with student learning. Findings highlight the importance of a balanced focus and connections between gaming and mathematics affordances to support student learning.

2 citations










Journal Article
Lee Allen1
TL;DR: The Online Content Modules: Computer Science in the Middle Grades project as discussed by the authors developed five online content modules with a focus on computer science instruction in three public school districts in West Tennessee, and disseminated through a week-long professional development summer institute.
Abstract: With ongoing efforts in the United States to further develop the availability of computer science education in the public schools, federal, state, and local educational agencies are increasing efforts to encourage and promote the inclusion of computer science and programming skills in the middle school curriculum (Grover and Pea in Comput. Sci. Educ. 25:199–237, 2015) [1]. The goal for the Online Content Modules: Computer Science in the Middle Grades project was the development of five online content modules with a focus on computer science instruction in three public school districts in West Tennessee, and disseminated through a week-long professional development summer institute.

Journal Article
TL;DR: The Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT) as mentioned in this paper is a train-the-trainer model to empower college students to make meaningful impacts in their local communities by engaging and inspiring younger students through science presentations.
Abstract: It is the responsibility of today's scientists, engineers, and educators to inspire and encourage our youth into technical careers that benefit our society. Too often, however, this responsibility is buried beneath daily job demands and the routines of teaching. Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT) programs leverage a train-the-trainer model to empower college students to make meaningful impacts in their local communities by engaging and inspiring younger students through science presentations. SPOT takes advantage of the excitement of space and the natural way college students serve as role models for children. The result is a win-win program for all involved. This paper describes the original Montana SPOT program, presents analyses demonstrating the success of SPOT, gives overviews of program adaptations in West Virginia and with the NANOGrav collaboration, describes how college student presenters are able to share complex topics, and discusses the importance of college student role models. We hope that our experiences with SPOT will help others implement similar strategies in their own communities.