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Showing papers in "The Police Journal in 1955"


Journal ArticleDOI

34 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose to start early in making arrangements and to rely on the accuracy of a clock in any building visited, for it can let you down badly, and they also suggest that planning to deal with them which are the product of much cogitation are much more likely to be effective than those made hurriedly.
Abstract: is: never rely on the accuracy of a clock in any building visited, for it can let you down badly. One other piece of advice is tendered, namely, to start early in making arrangements. True, by doing so one is apt to keep putting off dealing with some matters because there is so very much time available, so that the title \"Operation Procrastination\" becomes merited. On the other hand, an adequate margin of time allows for delays, some unavoidable and some culpable, by others. Moreover, time for reflection enables all foreseeable implications and contingencies to become apparent, and plans to deal with them which are the product of much cogitation are much more likely to be effective than those made hurriedly. And now that the many appreciatory letters to the police have been suitably acknowledged and passed to those who earned them, and the letters of thanks have been despatched to the various persons who helped the police, all that remains is to consign the substantial file that has accumulated to the archives. I wonder who, in perhaps another dozen years or so, will be getting it out to see what sort of a mess those fellows made of things in 1954?

17 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, it has been pointed out that the Police College has not been of such great benefit to the Police Service as it could be, and after this trial period of six years it seems both right and proper to consider in what way it can be improved.
Abstract: worthy motive. As has already been said the Police College has in the last six years done great work, but it is no criticism of the Staff of the College (who are bound by the present constitution) to say that the Police College has not been of such great benefit to the Police Service as it could be, and after this trial period of six years it seems both right and proper to consider in what way it could be improved. In trying to devise the ideal Police College the sole test is the need to enhance the value of the Police Service to the Country.

10 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors give a series of advice for driving in ice and snow: 1. Never drive at more than 30 m.p.h. on a treacherous road.
Abstract: 2. Chains are worse than bare tyres on an icy road. 3. Keep moving on hills at all costs, even if it is in bottom gear. 4. If you get stuck behind someone else who is stuck, do not try to get away by revving up in bottom gear. You are sure to spin your wheels. Engage second gear or even third and try to pull away very gently. 5. Never drive at more than 30 m.p.h. on a treacherous road. 6. Change down for every gradient, whether up or down, but the higher the low gear uphill, the better chance you have. 7. In meeting oncoming traffic, if you start to skid, be ready to aim to slide to the near-side rather than to the off. 8. If your wind-screen is getting coated, stop and clear screen and wipers when you reach a flat or downhill stretch. 9. People tend to stop anywhere on the road in snow and ice for fear of getting too near a drift or the ditch. Try to select a wide stretch or a lay-by so as not to interfere with other traffic. 10. Be meticulous about your signals. Everyone is scared stiff of the other fellow. 11. If you know you are going out in ice or snow, put a couple of old sacks and a spade in the boot. 12. Aftermath. Knock the snow from the underside of your wings before putting vehicle in the garage. It will save a flood. Many of these things may seem infantile, but it is surprising how many of the motoring public are ignorant of them. There is another piece of advice which may prove helpful. Everyone thinks that everyone else knows about the conditions. This is not by any means always so, and a word from a passing driver to a policeman about specially sticky patches on his route may often be of great assistance.

9 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
G. Webster1
TL;DR: The case of Middleton v. Dando (supra), a case brought under the Road Transport Lighting Act, 1927, and relating to a similar courtyard, as to be indistinguishable in principle as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: and slaters, both of which premises adjoined the court-yard. The court-yard was unmetalled and unpaved and part at least was used as a drying green. There was no evidence of vehicles passing through the court-yard from one opening to the other, the general practice being to turn vehicles in the yard and to enter and leave by the lane. No doubt the public had access-though there was no evidence of extensive use by them. In the sheriff's opinion, that was not enough. The court-yard might or might not have been a \"public place\" for the purpose of section 15; but section 12 was concerned only with a \"road.\" Sheriff Middleton went on to consider certain decided cases, both Scottish and English. The case of Harrison v. Hill (1932 J.e. 13) was decided on the question of access to a farm road. In Bugge v. Taylor (1941 I.K.B. 198) the locus was the forecourt of a hotel open at both ends and separated from a main road only by an island footpath. This court-yard was frequently used by pedestrians and vehicular traffic not visiting the hotel. In Purves v. Muir (1948 J.e. 122) the Lord Justice-Clerk, discussing the definition of \"road\" in the Act of 1930, said: \"The first thing that strikes one about that definition is that one must have either a highway or something which is, in a reasonable sense, a road.\" \"I do not think,\" said the sheriff, \"that it would be reasonable so to regard this court-yard, which, in so far as it was used by vehicles at all, was used solely as a means of access to adjacent premises by persons having business there and as a convenient spot in which to turn their vehicles or, on occasion, to park them. While there are points of divergence, the case seems to me to be so closely aligned to that of Thomas v. Dando (supra), a case brought under the Road Transport Lighting Act, 1927, and relating to a similar courtyard, as to be indistinguishable in principle.\

8 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The thorough process of assessment recommended has brought to the front the most outstanding men, the actual method of selection has still to be decided, and it is thought that the method can not easily be improved upon.
Abstract: the thorough process of assessment recommended has brought to the front the most outstanding men, the actual method of selection has still to be decided. It is common policy and rightly so, that standardized qualifying examinations be held in order to test the education and professional knowledge of officers. The Oaksey Committee were very wisely of the opinion that such examinations should not be so difficult that they would rule out many excellent policemen who were not good at examinations but who would otherwise deserve promotion because of their high personal qualities. It is thought that the method which has achieved official blessing can not easily be improved upon, viz. that eligible candidates apply to a properly constituted promotions board before whom they appear. Not only should the members of the promotions board be advised fully in regard to each candidate but it is most important that they be trained in the important art of interviewing. All of the assessments and opinions which have been recommended are based on a knowledge of the facts of an officer's force history, and, consequently, the best use that can be made of an interview is to assemble these facts, to elicit the details of his biography, and to build up as complete a case-history as is possible. This may sound pedestrian and time-consuming, and indeed it entails a great deal of painstaking hard work. But it is only on these grounds of fact that a satisfactory assessment can be built. In selecting officers for supervisory duties it must also always be assumed that the best constable will not always make the best sergeant or inspector, for good supervision requires a fresh approach to the problem of getting the work done satisfactorily. Besides vocational skill it requires organising ability and an understanding of human nature. (To be continued)

1 citations


Journal ArticleDOI

1 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider the taking of a statement as an Intimate affair, one between himself and the person he is interviewing, and the result of this co-operation can reasonably be expected to be a workmanlike and factual piece of recording which has missed none of the salient points and yet has remained rhythmic.
Abstract: be obtained as the result of co-operation, and co-operation in this sense must not be taken to imply influence. It simply means that you must get within the personality of the person being interviewed and then adopt the tactics which appear most likely to suit the occasion. Influencing does not and must not enter into it; a person can be guided through the recording of a statement without there being the slightest hint of influencing and without altering his vocabulary. The same rule applies when the person being interviewed is more academically equipped than the officer; it merely becomes the opportunity for a change in tactics. The result of this co-operation can reasonably be expected to be a workmanlike and factual piece of recording which has missed none of the salient points and yet has remained rhythmic. By adopting an attitude of detachment, that is to sayan \"out with the pocket-book, and what have you got to say?\" kind of thing, only a brash and lifeless piece of reportage can be the result. This attitude of mind is never likely to rise to even a mediocre standard of proficiency. The preliminary chat, or warming-up as it were, gives an opportunity to elucidate the facts and clarify and develop the essentials. It also gives the opportunity to prune the verbiage; the precise meaning is often lost amid the verbiage. It is also during this period of informality that an officer can glean some background knowledge. It is true that background knowledge is not always relevant, but it can, on occasions, prove to be very useful. The taking of a statement should be regarded by an officer as an Intimate affair, one between himself and the person he is interviewing. if he cannot bring himself to look at it in this way then he will never have the satisfaction of recording a \"gem,\" and what is more regrettable the absorbing subject of psychology will have passed him by. Police statements are not expected to live, as they say in the literary world, but they have an important job of work to do. The job not infrequently involves a decision to take a serious course of action. If they are going to do that job with justice then they must at least have life.