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Showing papers in "The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics in 1996"


Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: Findings show that college students vary greatly in their use of alcohol and their beliefs about its positive and negative consequences, but two major drinking patterns appear dominant among college students: drinking related to impulsivity, disinhibition, and sensation-seeking, and drinking to manage negative emotional states.
Abstract: Alcohol on college campuses is not a new problem, but recent concerns have centered on heavy episodic drinking, binge drinking. To address these concerns, the National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism established two panels of nongovernmental experts to help develop a national research agenda. This report represents the work of one of these panels, the panel on Contexts and Consequences. It is based on 12 commissioned, peerreviewed papers by experts in the field and extensive discussion about those papers. Panel findings show that college students vary greatly in their use of alcohol and their beliefs about its positive and negative consequences, but two major drinking patterns appear dominant among college students: drinking related to impulsivity, disinhibition, and sensation-seeking, and drinking to manage negative emotional states. The Panel identified a number of strategies to reduce student alcohol consumption. These include better research on student drinking, attention by college administrators to policies that inadvertently encourage student drinking and disciplinary policies, and possible mixed messages communicated by accepting sponsorships or gifts from the alcohol industry. The Panel also makes recommendations for the research community and the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. (Contains 8 figures and 192 references.) .(SLD) Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made from the original document. HIGH-RISK DRINKING IN COLLEGE: What We Know and What We Need To Learn Final Report of the Panel on Contexts and Consequences U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Educational Research and Improvement EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC) 17.41s document has been reproduced as received from the person or organization originating it. 1:1 Minor changes have been made to improve reproduction quality. Points of view or opinions stated in this document do not necessarily represent official OERI position or policy.

27 citations