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JournalISSN: 1206-0143

Topia: The Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies 

University of Toronto Press
About: Topia: The Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies is an academic journal published by University of Toronto Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Queer & Narrative. It has an ISSN identifier of 1206-0143. Over the lifetime, 534 publications have been published receiving 1980 citations. The journal is also known as: Canadian journal of cultural studies & Topia (Waterloo).
Topics: Queer, Narrative, Diaspora, Feminism, Racism


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that diaspora must be understood as a condition of subjectivity and not as an object of analysis, and they propose an understanding of diasporas as first and foremost a subjective condition marked by the contingencies of long histories of displacements and genealogies of dispossession.
Abstract: This essay argues that diaspora must be understood as a condition of subjectivity and not as an object of analysis I propose an understanding of diaspora as first and foremost a subjective condition marked by the contingencies of long histories of displacements and genealogies of dispossession In focusing on the problem of subjectivity and subject formation, I am suggesting that diasporas are not just there They are not simply collections of people, communities of scattered individuals bound by some shared history, race or religion Rather, they emerge in relation to power, in the turn to and away from power Diasporic subjects emerge in turning, turning back upon those markers of the self—homeland, memory, loss—even as they turn on or away from them

77 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors focused on the everyday processes whereby people, especially immigrants, are made into subjects of a particular nation-state, and how they are imagined, reproduced, and defined through culture, are linked to (and often sustain) struggles for change and freedom.
Abstract: Cultural expression is an important site of social andpolitical reproduction. How we imagine, reproduce, and define ourselves, and how we are imagined, reproduced, and defined through culture, are m'tically linked to (and often sustain) struggles for change and freedom. -Tricia Rose ( 1 997:259-60) Seldom is attention focused on the everyday processes whereby people, especially immigrants, are made into subjects of a particular nation-state. -Aihwa Ong ( 1 999:263)

71 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The 2003 SARS outbreak in Toronto, which killed forty-four and made hundreds sick, tested the multicultural model often presented as the reason for making that city a livable global metropolis.
Abstract: The 2003 SARS outbreak in Toronto, which killed forty-four and made hundreds sick, tested the multicultural model often presented as the reason for making that city a livable global metropolis. Billed as the “Chinese disease,” SARS connected seamlessly with previous periods of racializing disease assumed to originate from migrants and foreigners in North America. Yet when restaurants in the city’s three Chinatowns remained empty for weeks and close contact with Chinese citizens was avoided by others in public, the dynamics that unfolded also tied in with a new development in Toronto: the formation of the global city. As news on the SARS outbreak spread and the intricate details of travel patterns and infection-pathways became clearer, the relationships of Toronto diasporic communities and business ties with other globalizing cities like Hong Kong, Guangzhou and Singapore became obvious, and Toronto’s vulnerability in the network of global flows of finance, culture, commodities and people was exposed. Our paper provides a narrative of the racialization of infectious disease in the context of Toronto’s multiculturalism and the region’s formation as a major global city. Providing evidence of racialization in public discourse, everyday practices and institutional policies, we advance the hypothesis that the SARS outbreak strained the usually happy appearance of this particular multicultural urban fabric of diversity. This analysis is part of a long-term research project at York University on SARS and the Global City, which addresses the network connectivity of Toronto in the global city hierarchy; the influence of infectious disease; and the re-scaling of the health governance system in Toronto in the wake of the SARS outbreak.

49 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202334
202227
202121
202027
20196
201814