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Showing papers in "Translator in 2008"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the creativity and originality that can be generated by both interlingual and intersemiotic translations of Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth).
Abstract: This article discusses the creativity and originality that can be generated by both interlingual and intersemiotic translations The text of Gustav Mahler’s song symphony Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth) is taken from Hans Bethge’s adaptations of Chinese Tang poetry In 2002 a modern Chinese dance was set to Mahler’s masterpiece by Chiang Ching, a Chinese choreographer now living in the US For this performance, Mahler’s text was translated into Chinese by Cheng Chou-yu, an influential contemporary Chinese poet, and was recited as interludes between the movements The present article explores this loop of intertextuality surrounding Das Lied von der Erde, created by interlingual and intersemiotic translations, and illustrates how the idea of ‘translation’ is deeply embedded in Mahler’s composition and Chiang Ching’s staging of the dance For Mahler the idea of his text being a translation justifies his musical innovation; for Chiang Ching the overall aesthetic of her dance hinges on t

119 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines options in song translation and the concept of "singability" from a functional point of view and describes the strategic choices made by translators/lyricists in translating songs.
Abstract: This article examines options in song translation and the concept of ‘singability’ from a functional point of view and describes the strategic choices made by translators/lyricists in translating songs. Moving from the assumption that a song has three properties (music, lyrics and prospective performance) and music has three (melody, harmony and musical sense), it suggests that a song translator may have five options in theory: not translating the lyrics, translating the lyrics without taking the music into consideration, writing new lyrics, adapting the music to the translation, and adapting the translation to the music. In practice, some of these options may of course be combined. The article also suggests that the ambiguous term ‘singability’ can be defined as a musico-verbal fit of a text to music, and that this musico-verbal unity may consist of several layers – prosodic, poetic and semantic-reflexive. These layers may sometimes be modified, or optional, but they would be united in a fully fu...

87 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposed a functionalist/componential approach for translation quality evaluation, which is referred to as componential because it evaluates components of quality separately, and functionalist, because evaluation is carried out relative to the function specified for the translated text.
Abstract: Following a review of existing approaches to translation quality evaluation, this paper describes a proposal for evaluation that addresses some of the deficiencies found in these models. The proposed approach is referred to as componential because it evaluates components of quality separately, and functionalist, because evaluation is carried out relative to the function specified for the translated text. In order to obtain some empirical evidence for the functionalist/componential approach, a tool was developed and pilot-tested for inter-rater reliability. In addition, the research project sought to obtain some data on qualifications of raters/users and their performance using the tool. Forty raters were asked to use the tool to rate three translated texts. The texts selected for evaluation consisted of reader-oriented health education materials. Raters were bilinguals, professional translators and language teachers. Some basic training was provided. Data was collected by means of the tool and a q...

81 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explored the concept of status and reports on the first step of a comprehensive empirical project aimed at investigating the status of professional translators in various contexts, which involved a group of translators working for 13 major Danish companies considered to be at the high end of the translator-status continuum.
Abstract: The consensus amongst translators and translation scholars regarding translator status is that it is decidedly low. But is translator status as low as often claimed, and how do we meas- ure status? Is it only a question of salary? This article explores the concept of status and reports on the first step of a comprehensive empirical project aimed at investigating the status of professional translators in various contexts. The first study focused on here involved a group of translators working for 13 major Danish companies considered to be at the high end of the translator-status continuum, namely full-time Danish staff translators with MA qualifications in translation. The concept of status and how to define it were considered in relation to four parameters of occupational status: (i) salary; (ii) education/expertise; (iii) visibility/fame; and (iv) power/influence. The analysis, based on written questionnaires, charts the status of these translators as perceived by themselves and their fellow employees. On the basis of the findings, the authors suggest avenues and approaches for further research in this area.

76 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the work of Babels, an international network of volunteer translators and interpreters, and examined a specific controversy surrounding its positioning in relation to volunteer and activist practices of interpreting in the context of the World Social Forum.
Abstract: This paper focuses on the work of Babels, an international network of volunteer translators and interpreters, and examines a specific controversy surrounding its positioning in relation to volunteer and activist practices of interpreting in the context of the World Social Forum. Adopting a narrative perspective, it first examines some of the stories elaborated by Babels – of itself as a group and of its stance on activist interpreting in the Social Forum. It then offers an analysis of a letter that is highly critical of Babels, written by Peter Naumann, a professional interpreter, and published in AIIC’s online journal Communicate!. The study reported here is part of a larger project (Boeri, in progress). Rather than outlining binary and discrete positions, the picture that emerges out of the analysis offered here, and particularly in Boeri (in progress), is one of an open-ended, network-like constellation of positionings that are available to and taken up by members of the conference interpreting...

73 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the role played by translation in the context of musical performances, and suggested future avenues of research and theoretical frameworks, especially favouring the use of a descriptive and systemic approach to both micro- and macro-level investigation.
Abstract: Until quite recently, research on translation and music has been rather neglected within translation studies, despite the vital role that music plays in the day-to-day lives of individuals and the development, cohesion and organization of societies. The reasons behind this peripheral disciplinary position are explored and a critical examination of recent research on the topic is offered. Translation and music is shown to be a fascinating area to explore, not only for specialized translators/scholars but also for researchers in translation studies, cultural studies, media studies and musicology. By investigating the role played by translation in the context of musical performances, we can enrich our understanding of what forms translation can take and how it may relate to other forms of expression. The article concludes by suggesting future avenues of research and theoretical frameworks, especially favouring the use of a descriptive and systemic approach to both micro- and macro-level investigation...

42 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the notion of reflexivity in human conduct and the difficulty in accounting for such conduct in interpreter-mediated encounters, focusing on the reflexive practices deployed by all parties to the encounter in order to ascertain the extent to which such practices impact on the applicant's ability to assert his or her status as a "knowledgeable agent".
Abstract: Drawing on the work of Anthony Giddens (1976, 1984) this paper examines the notion of ‘reflexivity’ in human conduct and the difficulty in accounting for such conduct in interpreter-mediated encounters. The discussion is framed around narrative performance in asylum-seeker encounters, since it is within this particular context that the problem of the ‘reflexive agent’ is arguably thrown into sharpest relief, in contrast to other public service interpreting contexts. The focus is placed on the reflexive practices deployed by all parties to the encounter in order to ascertain the extent to which such practices impact on the applicant’s ability to assert his or her status as a ‘knowledgeable agent’ and promote his or her ‘authentic voice’ in the telling process. The account lays particular emphasis on the difficulties involved in unearthing and assessing motivation of human action as a reflexively and discursively-realized phenomenon, and ends with a call for the use of more forensically-oriented ana...

41 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The ways in which translation and code switching may be exploited in the creation of song lyrics featuring more than one language are examined and some contrasts between the functions they fulfil in such songs are pointed out.
Abstract: This paper examines the ways in which translation and code switching may be exploited in the creation of song lyrics featuring more than one language and points out some contrasts between the functions they fulfil in such songs and the ways they are exploited elsewhere. The discussion is based on illustrations drawn from a variety of sources, ranging from Western pop to North African rai music. The strategies identified include using translation to either replace or reduplicate the source material, rewriting with varying degrees of divergence from the original, juxtaposing components from different languages, and composing directly in a code switching variety. It is argued that in such lyrics translation and code switching often serve to produce very similar effects. Both may be used as affirmations of identity, as in-group markers, as stylistic devices, as a means of opening up the lyrics to outsiders or of producing effects such as alienation and exclusion. The effects achieved in particular cas...

28 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Empirical evidence for the existence of style differences among simultaneous interpreters is offered, which reveals differences between the two interpreters in the way they employ global strategies as well as the extent to which they rely upon certain local strategies, such as transcoding and backtracking.
Abstract: This paper offers empirical evidence for the existence of style differences among simultaneous interpreters The material consists of the simultaneous interpretation into English of two parts of a semi-prepared Dutch interview, by two professional interpreters The resulting data is analyzed with a view to identifying differences in the strategies used by the two interpreters The analysis reveals differences between the two interpreters in the way they employ global strategies (presentation, additions, omissions) as well as the extent to which they rely upon certain local strategies, such as transcoding and backtracking Other local strategies such as anticipation and the use of pauses (filled or not) are equally distributed between the interpreters A tentative distinction is made between two types of interpreter according to their interpreting style: the producer of a ‘lean’ target text and the producer of an ‘abundant’ target text

21 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a new line of research in the analysis of audiovisual material and the perception of fictional characters in original films and their translations, focusing on characterization in the dubbed French version of a musical episode of the American TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and more specifically on a song entitled "Something to Sing About", translated as "Donnez-moi ma vie" (Give me my life) in French.
Abstract: Translating audiovisual material such as songs that contribute to a film’s narrative is a challenge yet to be systematically researched in translation studies, and in its more specific branch of audiovisual translation (AVT). This article suggests a new line of research in the analysis of audiovisual material and the perception of fictional characters in original films and their translations, focusing on characterization in the dubbed French version of a musical episode of the American TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and more specifically on a song entitled ‘Something to Sing About’, translated as ‘Donnez-moi ma vie’ (Give me my life) in French. Lyrics, which are instrumental in allowing the viewer to make sense of the storyline and in constructing the characters’ personas, thus provide the main data for analysis. Characterization is investigated by examining shifts at the level of linguistic elements, including modality, complemented by an examination of parameters from cinematic modalities, ...

20 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a historical overview of the reception of stage musicals in Spain and examine the criteria for the selection of source texts for performance in sung translation, in an attempt to contextualize a translation phenomenon which has helped to fill a cultural gap and has had a significant impact on Spanish theatre system.
Abstract: This article aims to stimulate interest in the translation of musical texts by examining Anglo-American musicals sung in Spanish, a genre which has yielded some of the most outstanding successes in Spain’s theatre world ever since its arrival in the 1970s. It offers a historical overview of the reception of stage musicals in Spain and examines the criteria for the selection of source texts for performance in sung translation. Extra-textual factors such as audience needs and expectations, production processes and commercial and economic constraints are examined closely in an attempt to contextualize a translation phenomenon which has helped to fill a ‘cultural gap’ and has had a significant impact on the Spanish theatre system. The article demonstrates that the successful importation of Anglo-American musicals into Spain has been instrumental in fostering the autochthonous production of a genre apparently foreign to the country’s musical tradition. A number of concepts are borrowed from theatre and...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the influence of cultural studies theorist Homi K. Bhabha on translation studies, outlining and critiquing current usage of concepts connected with hybridity and the in-between.
Abstract: It has long been acknowledged that the disciplines of translation studies and cultural studies have much in common, yet little critical attention has been paid to the ways in which theorists from both disciplines borrow and adapt terms from each other in order to develop their own domains of enquiry. This paper focuses on the influence of cultural studies theorist Homi K. Bhabha on translation studies, outlining and critiquing current usage of concepts connected with ‘hybridity’ and the ‘in-between’. In particular, it examines Michaela Wolf’s exploration of the third space, contrasting her spatial interpretation of the term with Bhabha’s own emphasis on its temporal aspect, and suggesting a number of reasons why Wolf’s reading might be viewed as problematic. In addition, the paper outlines a variety of new modes of application of Bhabha’s theories to translation studies. These include imitating his mode of reading when studying source texts and translations, and exploring the relevance to the tran...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For example, the authors discusses the forays of Leningrad's rock community into theorizing and thematizing the relationship between Soviet and Anglophone rock music and investigates "translation" as it appears in songs by Boris.
Abstract: Soviet rock songwriters were deeply concerned with the difficulties involved in adapting rock music – a form they perceived to be ‘foreign’ in its very essence – to the demands of their own culture. Soviet rock fans had a certain limited access to Western cultural products and they often found fault with what they regarded as misreadings and distortions in the criticism, rewriting and appropriation of rock music by the official Soviet media and cultural institutions. The idea that rock music had to be transferred and translated correctly in order to retain its authenticity was central in the unofficial rock journalism during the late 1970s and early 1980s. Russian musicians and songwriters called upon a ‘canon’ of Western rock authors when making claims about the meaning of the genre. This article discusses the forays of Leningrad’s rock community into theorizing and thematizing the relationship between Soviet and Anglophone rock music and investigates ‘translation’ as it appears in songs by Boris...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the factors that influenced this reception and tried to establish whether the unsystematic and partial translation strategies employed played a role in this process, and analyzed the context of production and release of the Italian versions of fifteen popular American film musicals produced between the 1950s and late 1970s.
Abstract: After the climax of the Golden Age of the American film musical at the beginning of the 1950s, Hollywood musicals quickly reached Italy and were screened and broadcast frequently over the years. Italian distributors were eager to exploit the success these productions had achieved in their country of origin, as the magical and utopian worlds evoked by these films were equally appealing to Italian audiences. Yet the genre was received rather unevenly in Italy. This article examines the factors that influenced this reception and attempts to establish whether the unsystematic and partial translation strategies employed played a role in this process. It first offers a brief overview of the genre’s evolution and of its unique and multifaceted ‘language’. It then analyzes the context of production and release of the Italian versions of fifteen popular American film musicals produced between the 1950s and late 1970s, before describing the translation strategies employed. Finally, some examples from macro-...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In a recent special issue on translation and music as discussed by the authors, the authors present a review of the literature in the field of music translation and present a bibliography covering existing research in this field.
Abstract: This special issue on translation and music was conceived as an opportunity to take stock of what has been done on the topic so far and to explore future research possibilities. A bibliography covering existing research in the field is therefore indispensable. The following bibliography is not genre-specific. Although it includes several references that focus on opera translation, it mainly covers research on or in relation to the translation of other noncanonized musical genres.1 The languages covered are mainly English, and to some extent French, German, Swedish, Finnish, Italian and Spanish. The majority of the works covered appeared in the last two decades, although a few texts date back to the first half of the 20th century.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The annotated bibliography as discussed by the authors is a product of our long-standing interest in opera translation and media accessibility, which covers earlier works in the field from musicology, as well as the later works from within translation studies.
Abstract: This annotated bibliography is a product of our long-standing interest in opera translation and media accessibility. It covers earlier works in the field from musicology, as well as the later works from within translation studies; both reflect the multifarious nature of opera, which requires examination from a variety of perspectives. The bibliography includes entries in English, German, French, Italian and Spanish, because these are the languages we are familiar with; nevertheless, many of the entries offer examples also from other language pairs. We include works of specialists in the field, such as Ronnie Apter, Mark Herman, Klaus Kaindl, Dinda Gorlée, Lucile Desblache and Marta Mateo, but we also review articles which have been overlooked yet are still significant in the realm of opera and its translation, such as those by W.H Auden and Sigmund Spaeth. Although the bibliography cannot lay claim to comprehensiveness, we believe that the selection offered will be useful to future researchers in the field.

Journal ArticleDOI
Senem Öner1
TL;DR: The authors examines the translation of Kurdish folk songs into Turkish and analyzes the translation strategies used as well as the textual-linguistic makeup of the lyrics, and suggests that the main reason behind the controversy concerned the way in which the songs were presented to the audiences rather than how they were actually translated.
Abstract: This article examines the translation of Kurdish folk songs into Turkish, an issue which became the subject of a heated debate and controversy in Turkey during the 1990s. It outlines three areas of criticism related to the translations in question and analyzes the translation strategies used as well as the textual-linguistic makeup of the lyrics. Although criticism tended to focus on the cultural policies of the Turkish state, on the translators themselves, and on questions of ethics and economic exploitation, the translations paradoxically display loss, destruction and forgetting on the one hand, and gain, survival and remembering of Kurdish culture on the other. The translators seem to have appealed to two target audiences at the same time, one of which is also the source audience. The article suggests that the main reason behind the controversy concerned the way in which the songs were presented to the audiences rather than how they were actually translated. Given that the Turkish versions were...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Kaindl defined the translation of opera as "the creation of textual interconnections that can be realized on the stage" (i.e., the connection of word and sound on the one hand and the scenic performance of this combination on the other).
Abstract: The importance and relevancy of Klaus Kaindl’s book have not diminished during the thirteen years since its publication. The study has indeed opened up “perspectives of an interdisciplinary study of translation” and clarified those already in existence. It examines opera as the object of translation, which it constructs as a multimedia textual gestalt. Consequently, the various approaches to this object, the methods employed and the conclusions at which it arrives are of considerable interest also for students of intermediality who are not particularly concerned with questions of interlingual translation. According to the concluding summary the study has as its objective “to develop theoretical approaches to a translation of opera texts that is fit to be staged (bühnengerecht), and to the critical evaluation of such translations” (p. 256).1 Based on the widely shared assumption that the starting point for any translation is not words or phrases but a text, Kaindl’s study defines the translation of opera as “the creation of textual interconnections that can be realized on the stage” (ibid.). In this view, a translation has to consider the connection of word and sound on the one hand and the scenic performance of this combination on the other. The text to be translated is thus characterized by its multimediality – a characteristic that, according to Kaindl, has received very little attention from students of translation, although the wide range of multimedia texts that has actually been covered by translations comprises a rich but as yet unexplored area for research. While questions concerning the interdependence of word and music in opera have been treated in numerous

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A Landmark in the Semiotics of Translation as discussed by the authors is a seminal work in the field of translation, which is based on the Translator's Translator: Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 157-164.
Abstract: (2008). A Landmark in the Semiotics of Translation. The Translator: Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 157-164.