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JournalISSN: 0272-3638

Urban Geography 

Taylor & Francis
About: Urban Geography is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Urban geography & Metropolitan area. It has an ISSN identifier of 0272-3638. Over the lifetime, 2418 publications have been published receiving 59959 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An equity-mapping analysis of access to park space enjoyed by children and youth in Los Angeles (LA), and by residents according to their race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status finds that low-income and concentrated poverty areas as well as neighborhoods dominated by Latinos, African Americans, and Asian-Pacific Islanders have dramatically lower levels of accessing park resources than White-dominated areas of the city.
Abstract: An equity-mapping analysis of access to park space enjoyed by children and youth in Los Angeles (LA), and by residents according to their race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status finds that low-income and concentrated poverty areas as well as neighborhoods dominated by Latinos, African Americans, and Asian-Pacific Islanders, have dramatically lower levels of access to park resources than White-dominated areas of the city. Further, a mapping of park-bond funding allocations by location reveals that funding patterns often exacerbate rather than ameliorate existing inequalities in park and open-space resource distributions. Given the lack of large parcels for park acquisition, these results indicate that creative strategies for providing open space—such as utilizing vacant lots, alleys, underutilized school sites, public or utility-owned property, unnecessarily wide streets, and abandoned riverbeds—will be required in the city's older neighborhoods to redress existing inequities in access to parks.

546 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the limits to the critique of neoliberalism in the progressive geographical literature and argued that recent work on neoliberalism will need to be "provincialized" in order to create intellectual space for alternative ideas that may be more relevant to cities where the majority of the world's urban population now resides.
Abstract: The demographic transition of the late 20th and early 21st centuries has shifted the locus of urbanizing populations from the global North to the global South. As the theoretical epicenter of urban scholars and policymakers adjusts to accommodate this transition, some realignment in how ideas are weighted and applied is inevitable. This recalibration, while not necessarily comfortable for those in established positions of intellectual power, is desirable and maybe even overdue. The overarching argument presented here is that recent work on neoliberalism, despite its quality and relevance for many places, will need to be "provincialized" in order to create intellectual space for alternative ideas that may be more relevant to cities where the majority of the world's urban population now resides. To this end, we explore the limits to the critique of neoliberalism—a perspective that has assumed hegemonic dimensions in the progressive geographical literature. In seeking post-neoliberal insights, we highlight t...

462 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a three-phase process is introduced to enable these "five Ws" to be negotiated collectively and to engender critical reflection on the politics of urban resilience as plans, initiatives, and projects are conceived, discussed, and implemented.
Abstract: In academic and policy discourse, the concept of urban resilience is proliferating. Social theorists, especially human geographers, have rightfully criticized that the underlying politics of resilience have been ignored and stress the importance of asking “resilience of what, to what, and for whom?” This paper calls for careful consideration of not just resilience for whom and what, but also where, when, and why. A three-phase process is introduced to enable these “five Ws” to be negotiated collectively and to engender critical reflection on the politics of urban resilience as plans, initiatives, and projects are conceived, discussed, and implemented. Deployed through the hypothetical case of green infrastructure in Los Angeles, the paper concludes by illustrating how resilience planning trade-offs and decisions affect outcomes over space and time, often with significant implications for equity.

433 citations

BookDOI
TL;DR: This article presented a distinct approach to conceptualizing the city through the lens of urban learning and integrated fieldwork conducted in Mumbai's informal settlements with debates on urban policy, political economy, and development.
Abstract: • Presents a distinct approach to conceptualising the city through the lens of urban learning • Integrates fieldwork conducted in Mumbai's informal settlements with debates on urban policy, political economy, and development • Considers how knowledge and learning are conceived and created in cities • Addresses the way knowledge travels and opportunities for learning about urbanism between North and South

429 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore various theoretical, epistemological, methodological and political implications of Lefebvre's hypothesis of complete urbanization of society, and assembles a series of analytical and cartographic interventions that supersede inherited spatial ontologies (urban/rural, town/country, city/non-city, society/nature) in order to investigate the uneven implosions and explosions of capitalist urbanization across places, regions, territories, continents and oceans up to the planetary scale.
Abstract: In 1970, Henri Lefebvre put forward the radical hypothesis of the complete urbanization of society, a circumstance that in his view required a radical shift from the analysis of urban form to the investigation of urbanization processes. Drawing together classic and contemporary texts on the "urbanization question", this book explores various theoretical, epistemological, methodological and political implications of Lefebvre's hypothesis. It assembles a series of analytical and cartographic interventions that supersede inherited spatial ontologies (urban/rural, town/country, city/non-city, society/nature) in order to investigate the uneven implosions and explosions of capitalist urbanization across places, regions, territories, continents and oceans up to the planetary scale.

344 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202343
2022122
2021130
2020141
201994
201886