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Showing papers in "Vetus Testamentum in 1984"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Word Biblical Commentary as mentioned in this paper is a collection of commentaries from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation, emphasizing a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence.
Abstract: The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship.

147 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Our standard lexica and grammars of Biblical Hebrew quite correctly recognize the many instances of 'dz followed by an imperfect verb-form to express a future-temporal or a logical consequence.
Abstract: Our standard lexica and grammars of Biblical Hebrew quite correctly recognize the many instances of 'dz followed by an imperfect verb-form to express a future-temporal or a logical consequence. It seems to me, however, that they have not correctly interpreted that fairly large group of instances (some fifteen) in which 'dz followed by an imperfect expresses neither a future nor a logical consequence, but rather a past action or happening,-appears, that is to say, scarcely distinguishable in usage from the far larger group of instances (more than thirty) in which 'dz is followed by a perfect verb-form. The seeming indistinguishability in usage is now most commonly attributed to an assumed persistence of "the old preterite meaning of the imperfect",2 but this theory, besides presenting other difficulties which must be explained away, fails to provide a criterion for an editor's or a compiler's choice of one or the other form in each case. It offers no real understanding, for example, of why "Then ... went up" at Josh. x 33 is expressed by 'dz and the perfect form C'aldh, while at 2 Kings xii 18 and xvi 5 the same construction is expressed by 'dz and the imperfect form ya 'leh. 3 In fact, however, as will here be shown, when used pasttemporally 'dz followed by an imperfect is not at all the equivalent

30 citations









Journal ArticleDOI

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Howard Marshall, professor of New Testament exegesis at the University of Aberdeen, is well known as a stalwart of evangelical Christianity and has taken up the challenge of what is once again one of the storm centres in evangelical thought, and has done so with the careful and cautious scholarship which is his hallmark.
Abstract: Howard Marshall, professor of New Testament exegesis at the University of Aberdeen, is well known as a stalwart of evangelical Christianity. In this book, originally two lectures at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford, he has taken up the challenge of what is once again one of the storm centres in evangelical thought, and has done so with the careful and cautious scholarship which is his hallmark. At first, on the Bible's testimony to itself and the meaning of inspiration, he does not seem to move the discussion beyond J. L Packer's influential treatment of Fundamentalism, with the opportunity for a thorough discussion of important recent contributions by P. J. Achtemeier and W. J. Abraham only taken up in part. In particular, the correlation between 'inspiring' (God speaks now through Scripture) and 'inspired' needs more careful analysis, and the claim that 'New Testament writers regard the statements in the Old Testament as having unquestioned authority' (p.23) does surely need to be more carefully correlated with the recognition on the next page that much of the OT teachings had been 'superseded', 'lost their validity', and were regarded as 'no longer binding' on the first Christians. The subsequent discussion of 'the results of inspiration', however, is more carefully nuanced. Marshall justifiably warns that 'a concern for the truth of the Bible in every part may be too narrow and even inappropriate' (p.53). The student of the Bible must always ask questions like 'true for what purpose?', 'true for whom?'. Such features as 'historical approximation' and even 'historical error' need not be regarded as incompatible with the Bible's character as the Word of God, or with a belief in its entire trustworthiness for its divinely intended purpose. Since even upholders of biblical inerrancy have to reckon with textual uncertainties and disputed problems of interpretation, 'a further measure of uncertainty at the level of the original text does not greatly affect the situation' (p.69). The following chapter is an exposition of 'the grammatico-historical method' of biblical study. 'A self-critical biblical criticism is indispensable and ... the devout seeker after God's truth has nothing to fear from it' (p.93). And the question, 'How are we to interpret the Bible?', is answered by rightly stressing the primacy of the meaning which the original authors intended to convey to the original readers. As the author himself predicts, he will probably draw fire from both sides of the debate about the Bible: from his academic colleagues for reverting to such oversimplified conservative constructs as 'biblical Christianity', from his more conservative admirers for championing the slogan 'infallibility' against the current favourite 'inerrancy'. All the more praise to him that, with passions running high, he has chosen to present such an eirenic middle way. It would be a heartening sign if his quiet counsel was given the hearing and allowed the influence it deserves.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present evidence of purposeful editorial activity within the text of the canonical psalter and demonstrate several techniques of organization employed there to group psalms together as well as to indicate disjuncture between groupings.
Abstract: In the last hundred years, Psalms scholarship has tended to focus its attention on the isolation and comparison of psalm-types and on the related attempt to discern the original social matrix of each "type" (under the influence of Hermann Gunkel and Sigmund Mowinckel). This narrow focus, which has produced an abundance of illuminative data, has had the unfortunate effect of deflecting concern from the study of the editorial organization of the Psalter as a whole. As a result there is a generally pessimistic evaluation of the importance of the final arrangement of the Psalter. While there is agreement that the canonical Psalter brings together a number of earlier psalms collections, the internal arrangement of these collections, as well as their position in relation to one another is largely dismissed as the result of "accidental" juxtaposition. In this article I will set out evidence of purposeful editorial activity within the text of the canonical psalter. I intend to demonstrate several techniques of organization employed there to group psalms together as well as to indicate disjuncture between groupings. It is my contention that the editorial activity thus demonstrated is not limited to isolated instances of organizational concern imbedded in an otherwise disorganized psalter. Neither does it reflect casual editorial attempts to connect together previously unrelated collections. Rather, this evidence supports a continuing, purposeful editorial attempt to bring meaningful "shape" to the whole Psalter. I will discuss three methods of grouping psalms and of indicating division between groupings. These include: 1) the use of "author" designations in the psalm-headings; 2) the function of genre categories in those same headings; and 3) the use of hllwyh psalms in conjunction with those introduced by the phrase hwdw lyhwh ky twb ky lCwlm hsdw in the final two books of the psalter. I turn first to the use of "author" designations in the grouping of the psalms.










Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Les oracles comportant l'expression al-tira dans: Isaie 41: 8-13, 14-16, 43: 1-4, 5-7, 6-8, 7-9, 9-10, 11-11, 12-13 and 14-15 as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Les oracles comportant l'expression al-tira dans: Isaie 41: 8-13, 14-16, 43: 1-4, 5-7 et 44: 1-5. L'A. montre que ces oracles ne representent pas une seule Gattung (contre C. Westermann), mais deux Gattungen distinctes: l'oracle de guerre deuteronomiste (Deuteronome 3: 2/Nombres 21: 34, Josue 8: 1-2, 10: 8, 11: 6) et l'oracle patriarcal (Genese 15: 1, 21: 17, 26: 24 et 46: 3). Distinguer ces deux Gattungen dans le Deutero-Isaie aide a mieux interpreter l'imagerie complexe concernant Israel comme serviteur de YHWH.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors study the literary terms Mdrchen, Sage and Legende and list the characteristics of the genre which each designates, survey broadly some English renderings and uses of the terms by Old Testament scholars, and give a descriptive definition of each.
Abstract: The purpose of this article is (1) to study briefly the literary terms Mdrchen, Sage and Legende and to list the characteristics of the genre which each designates, (2) to survey broadly some English renderings and uses of the terms by Old Testament scholars, (3) to suggest a translation of the terms and (4) to give a descriptive definition of each. It is hoped thereby to point the way towards a clarification in one area of biblical scholarship.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the development of the Sinai narrative Ex. xx 22-23 plays a key role, in which Ex. xix-xxiv, xxxii-xxxiv as a whole plays the key role.
Abstract: study of the Sinai narrative in Exodus is well known both from his monograph Exodus and Sinai in History and Tradition (Oxford, 1973), and his numerous articles.2 In Part 1 of this article I shall consider his treatment of Ex. xx 22-23 contained in one such article, "The Decalogue as the direct address of God", VT27 (1977), pp. 422-33. In Part 2 I shall offer an interpretation of the development of the Sinai narrative Ex. xix-xxiv, xxxii-xxxiv as a whole, in which Ex. xx 22-23 plays the key role.