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Proceedings ArticleDOI

A comparative analysis of high school students’ and school librarians’ conceptions and practices of Digital Safety

TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated high school students' and school librarians' conceptions about what it means to be safe online and to understand the actions, processes, and strategies they engage in to ensure that students are safe online.
Abstract: This study investigated high school students’ and school librarians’ conceptions about what it means to be safe online and to understand the actions, processes, and strategies they engage in order to be safe online. The study also identified the existing library programs organized by school librarians in relation to digital safety and how school librarians and school libraries can support and address students’ digital safety needs. This paper sought to answer the following research questions: 1) What do students think it means to be safe online? Sub-question: What do students do themselves to be safe online? 2) What do school librarians think it means to be safe online? Sub-question: What do school librarians do themselves to be safe online? 3) What do students think of librarians’ role helping them to be safe online? 4)What existing library programs are implemented by school librarians in relation to digital safety? By understanding possible gaps between students’ and school librarians’ conceptions and practices on digital safety, educators and school administrators will gain understanding on how digital safety could be more effectively developed and integrated as part of the school curriculum.
Citations
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30 Jun 2015
TL;DR: This is the second edition of school library guidelines published by the IFLA Section of School Libraries to assist school library professionals and educational decision-makers in their efforts to ensure that all students and teachers have access to effective school library programs and services.
Abstract: This is the second edition of school library guidelines published by the IFLA Section of School Libraries. These guidelines have been developed to assist school library professionals and educational decision-makers in their efforts to ensure that all students and teachers have access to effective school library programs and services, delivered by qualified school library personnel. These guidelines constitute the second edition of the IFLA ‘School Library Guidelines’. The first edition of the school library guidelines was developed in 2002 by the School Libraries Section, then called the School Libraries and Resource Centers Section. These guidelines have been developed to assist school library professionals and educational decision-makers in their efforts to ensure that all students and teachers have access to effective school library programs and services, delivered by qualified school library personnel.

12 citations

References
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01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an analysis of parental mediation in the EU Kids Online survey of 25,142 9-16 year olds in 25 countries and show that restrictive mediation reduces online risks, but it also reduces their online opportunities and skills.
Abstract: Given the Safer Internet Day 2012 theme of Connecting Generations, we ask whether, instead of imposing restrictions, parents can support their child’s internet safety by sharing a positive experience of internet use with them. An analysis of parental mediation in the EU Kids Online survey of 25,142 9-16 year olds in 25 countries shows that restrictive mediation reduces online risks, but it also reduces their online opportunities and skills. The new analysis in this report shows that when parents actively mediate their child’s internet use, this too is associated with lower risk and, most important, lower harm. However, parental active mediation of use is linked to more (not fewer) online activities and skills.

173 citations

Book
12 Jul 2011
TL;DR: Infusing Digital and Media Literacy Across the Curriculum Across theCurriculum: Teaching With Current Events and the Power of Representation Create is a guide to teaching with digital and media literacy.
Abstract: Preface Publisher's Acknowledgments About the Author Access 1. Why Digital and Media Literacy 2. Research as Authentic Inquiry Analyze 3. Critical Questions, Close Reading 4. The Power of Representation Create 5. Composing With Media Across the Curriculum Reflect 6. Protection and Empowerment 7. Life Online Take Action 8. What in the World: Teaching With Current Events 9. Infusing Digital and Media Literacy Across the Curriculum Endnotes Bibliography Index

137 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss a rural middle school teacher's use of YouTube, digital stories, and blogs in a language arts curriculum and share the voices of middle school students as they learn through this technology in the classroom.
Abstract: In this article, the authors discuss a rural middle school teacher's use of YouTube, digital stories, and blogs in a language arts curriculum. The authors also share the voices of middle school students as they learn through this technology in the classroom. Although a wide variety of technology integration exists in this middle school language arts classroom, the authors highlight the use of YouTube, digital stories, and blogs because they represent simple tools appropriate for any teacher's use and can easily be used together. The authors explain how to use these digital tools and provide examples of actual classroom practice.

112 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose to use ICT in primary education by learning to use digital tools critically, confidently and creatively, with attention paid to security, safety, and privacy.
Abstract: Lifelong learning strategies need to answer to the growing need for advanced digital competence for all jobs and for all learners Learning digital skills not only needs to be addressed as a separate subject but also embedded within teaching in all subjects Building digital competence by embedding and learning ICT should start as early as possible, ie in primary education, by learning to use digital tools critically, confidently and creatively, with attention paid to security, safety, and privacy Teachers need to be equipped with the digital competence themselves, in order to support this process How to obtain EU publications Our priced publications are available from EU Bookshop (http://bookshopeuropaeu), where you can place an order with the sales agent of your choice The Publications Office has a worldwide network of sales agents You can obtain their contact details by sending a fax to (352) 29 29-42758 The mission of the JRC is to provide customer-driven scientific and technical support for the conception, development, implementation and monitoring of EU policies As a service of the European Commission, the JRC functions as a reference centre of science and technology for the Union Close to the policy-making process, it serves the common interest of the Member States, while being independent of special interests, whether private or national

111 citations