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Journal ArticleDOI

A critical review: emerging bioeconomy and waste-to-energy technologies for sustainable municipal solid waste management

01 Nov 2019-Vol. 1, Iss: 3, pp 151-167
TL;DR: A critical review of various technologies, with their updated progress, involved in the exploitation of MSW as a renewable resource, along with the critical advantages and limitations on energy and material cycling for sustainable MSW management is presented in this article.
Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) management has emerged as probably the most pressing issue many governments nowadays are facing. Traditionally, Waste-to-Energy(WtE) is mostly associated with incineration, but now, with the emergence of the bioeconomy, it embraces a broader definition comprising any processing technique that can generate electricity/heat or produce a waste-derived fuel. Under the ambit of the circular economy many nations are looking for, additional effort must be made to be sure of acquiring the most updated information and paving a sustainable path for managing MSW in such a frame. In this regard, we have undertaken a critical review of various technologies, with their updated progress, involved in the exploitation of MSW as a renewable resource, along with the critical advantages and limitations on energy and material cycling for sustainable MSW management. Incineration, the most widely used method, is nowadays difficult to further apply due to its dubious reputation and social opposition. Meanwhile, to address the organic fraction of MSW which currently is mostly unrecycled and causes disposal issues, the biological approach presents an attractive option. The new emphasis of bioeconomy leads us to understand how environmental biotechnologies should be better connected/integrated for more sustainable MSW management. This article is concluded with advances of future prospects, which can serve as a timely reminder to encourage competent authorities/researchers to work towards further improvement of the present MSW management system.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review is presented to provide an overview of the opportunities combining both hydrothermal and biological techniques for biomass valorization, and to assess the energy balance and economic feasibility of different integrated options reported in previous studies.
Abstract: Biomass valorization for the production of various value-added biochemicals and biofuels plays a significant role in modern biorefineries/bioenergy towards a climate neutrality future. Among the developed valorization techniques for biorefining, hydrothermal and biological treatments have been demonstrated to valorize raw biomass materials or upgrade biorefinery intermediate products to afford respectably desired product yields. From the perspective of both green chemistry and circular bioeconomy, whether the inter-disciplinary approach could achieve complete biomass valorization with balanced energy and extra profits remains questionable. This review is presented to provide an overview of the opportunities combining both hydrothermal and biological techniques for biomass valorization. Combinations including (1) hydrothermal pretreatment followed by biological valorization (such as enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, anaerobic digestion, or composting) and (2) hydrothermal valorization of substrates generated from biological techniques (such as enzymatic hydrolysis pretreated food waste, or anaerobic digestion produced digestate) for the production of biochar, biocrude or syngas are comprehensively reviewed. The recent advances regarding treatment conditions, synergies between hydrothermal and biological techniques, and optimal performances are summarized and compared. Assessment of the energy balance and economic feasibility of different integrated options reported in previous studies is also compared. Finally, challenges and perspectives for advancing integrated hydrothermal and biological techniques toward complete biomass valorization are concluded.

98 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Reduced nitrogen loss and high quality compost could be produced from food waste digestate by adapting mitigation strategies, and the nitrogen dynamics cycle considering high ammonium nitrogen content in the digestate is evaluated.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Artificial Intelligence based Hybridized Intelligent Framework (AIHIF) has been proposed for automated recycling to optimizing the waste management process and results show that the proposed method enhances performance and accuracy when compared to other existing methods.

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the potential applications and challenges for hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) as green and sustainable way were presented, which will provide prospect for hydrochar as clean and renewable biofuel.

64 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a review of municipal solid waste (MSW) to energy technologies taking the circular economy perspective is presented, and the critical characteristics of technologies for the MSW to energy routes are scrutinised.

62 citations

References
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01 Mar 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors estimate that the amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated by urban populations is growing even faster than the rate of urbanization and that by 2025 this will likely increase to 4.3 billion urban residents.
Abstract: Solid waste management is the one thing just about every city government provides for its residents. While service levels, environmental impacts and costs vary dramatically, solid waste management is arguably the most important municipal service and serves as a prerequisite for other municipal action. As the world hurtles toward its urban future, the amount of municipal solid waste (MSW), one of the most important by-products of an urban lifestyle, is growing even faster than the rate of urbanization. Ten years ago there were 2.9 billion urban residents who generated about 0.64 kg of MSW per person per day (0.68 billion tonnes per year). This report estimates that today these amounts have increased to about 3 billion residents generating 1.2 kg per person per day (1.3 billion tonnes per year). By 2025 this will likely increase to 4.3 billion urban residents generating about 1.42 kg/capita/day of municipal solid waste (2.2 billion tonnes per year).

2,233 citations


"A critical review: emerging bioecon..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Waste management has been around as a public service since as early as 1751, and it literally covers all polices and exercises required to manage solid, liquid, or gaseous waste, starting from its initial generation to ultimate disposal [10]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a comprehensive state of the art describing the advancement in recent pretreaments, metabolic engineering approaches with special emphasis on the latest developments in consolidated biomass processing, current global scenario of bioethanol pilot plants and biorefinery concept for the production of biofuels and bioproducts.

1,369 citations

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TL;DR: A critical review that summarizes state-of-the-art technologies for biogas upgrading and enhancement with particular attention to the emerging biological methanation processes.

815 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors categorized biorefineries into three phases based on the flexibility of input, processing capabilities, and product generation, i.e., phase I has less or no flexibility in any of the three aforementioned categories.
Abstract: Conventional resources mainly fossil fuels are becoming limited because of the rapid increase in energy demand. This imbalance in energy demand and supply has placed immense pressure not only on consumer prices but also on the environment, prompting mankind to look for sustainable energy resources. Biomass is one such environmentally friendly renewable resource from which various useful chemicals and fuels can be produced. A system similar to a petroleum refinery is required to produce fuels and useful chemicals from biomass and is known as a biorefinery. Biorefineries have been categorized in three phases based on the flexibility of input, processing capabilities, and product generation. Phase I has less or no flexibility in any of the three aforementioned categories. Phase II, while having fixed input and processing capabilities, allows flexibility in product generation. Phase III allows flexibility in all the three processes and is based on the concept of high-value low-volume (HVLV) and low-value high...

620 citations

Reference EntryDOI
16 Dec 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an overview of the state of the art in the field of biorefinery research and development in the European Union and Germany, as well as their vision and goals and plans for the future.
Abstract: The article contains sections titled: 1. Introduction 2. Historical Outline 2.1. Historical Technological Outline and Industrial Resources 2.2. The Beginning–A Digest 2.2.1. Sugar Production 2.2.2. Starch Hydrolysis 2.2.3. Wood Saccharification 2.2.4. Furfural 2.2.5. Cellulose and Pulp 2.2.6. Levulinic Acid 2.2.7. Lipids 2.2.8. Vanillin from Lignin 2.2.9. Lactic Acid 2.3. The Origins of Integrated Biobased Production 3. Situation 3.1. Some Current Aspects of Biorefinery Research and Development 3.2. Raw Material Biomass 3.3. National Vision and Goals and Plan for Biomass Technology in the United States 3.4. Vision and Goals and Plan for Biomass Technology in the European Union and Germany 4. Principles of Biorefineries 4.1. Fundamentals 4.2. Definition of the Term “Biorefinery” 4.3. The Role of Biotechnology 4.3.1. Guidelines of Fermentation Section within Glucose-product Family Tree 4.4. Building Blocks, Chemicals and Potential Screening 5. Biorefinery Systems and Design 5.1. Introduction 5.2. Lignocellulosic Feedstock Biorefinery 5.3. Whole-crop Biorefinery 5.4. Green Biorefinery 5.5. Two-platform Concept and Syngas 6. Biorefinery Economy 7. Outlook and Perspectives

556 citations

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