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Book ChapterDOI

A Fast Handoff Technique for Wireless Mobile Networks

10 Jan 2019-pp 251-259
TL;DR: The result shows that this approach is better than all existing approaches as a result of it reduces scan delay to some zero and to boot reduces re-association delay, that the general handoff delay is unbelievably low for Multimedia Applications.
Abstract: To maintain user quality in IEEE 802.11 networks could also be a troublesome issue, and conjointly the necessity for Multimedia Applications. To take care of the quality of the connections, these Multimedia applications want fast handoffs between Base Stations (BS). Previous work is based on maintaining a neighbor table by presently associated Access Point (AP) and scan delay. In this paper, we have made an attempt to propose a Neighboring approach where scan delay has been reduced to some zero by exploiting the MH neighbor table. It contains detailed knowledge of all the applications that unit at intervals. The MH neighbor table has been maintained by MH itself and its updated once each 0.5 s interval therefore it ensures the MH neighbor table contains details of exclusions that APs unit extremely neighbor of MH nonetheless as MH context knowledge has been transferred by presently associated AP to exclude that APs that’s at intervals, or we’ll recommend that APs that details have been sent by MH to presently associated AP. The result shows that this approach is better than all existing approaches as a result of it reduces scan delay to some zero and to boot reduces re-association delay, that the general handoff delay is unbelievably low for Multimedia Applications.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A novel neighboring approach for fast handoff where scan delay has been reduced to zero by exploiting the MH neighbor table is proposed and the result shows that the proposed approach is better than state-of-the-art approaches in terms of scan delay and re-association delay.
Abstract: Mobile handoff is a relatively significant charters-tic that involves the quality of connections (QoC) between the base stations (BS) and mobile hosts (MH). Maintaining the QoC in IEEE 802.11 networks is an important challenge in wireless mobile networks, and conjointly the necessity for the different real-life wireless mobile applications. To take care of the QoC, these wireless mobile applications is responsible for fast handoffs between BS. Most of the current research is based on a neighbor graph and maintaining the neighbor table by the connected access point and calculates the scan delay. This paper has proposed a novel neighboring approach for fast handoff where scan delay has been reduced to zero by exploiting the MH neighbor table. The result shows that the proposed approach is better than state-of-the-art approaches in terms of scan delay and re-association delay.

3 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2003
TL;DR: This paper presents an empirical study of this handoff process at the link layer, with a detailed breakup of the latency into various components, showing that a MAC layer function - probe is the primary contributor to the overall handoff latency.
Abstract: IEEE 802.11 based wireless networks have seen rapid growth and deployment in the recent years. Critical to the 802.11 MAC operation, is the handoff function which occurs when a mobile node moves its association from one access point to another. In this paper, we present an empirical study of this handoff process at the link layer, with a detailed breakup of the latency into various components. In particular, we show that a MAC layer function - probe is the primary contributor to the overall handoff latency. In our study, we observe that the latency is significant enough to affect the quality of service for many applications (or network connections). Further we find variations in the latency from one hand-off to another as well as with APs and STAs used from different vendors. Finally, we discuss optimizations on the probe phase which can potentially reduce the probe latency by as much as 98% (and a minimum of 12% in our experiments). Based on the study, we draw some guidelines for future handoff schemes.

954 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2002
TL;DR: The goals of this study are to extend the understanding of wireless user behavior and wireless network performance, and to characterize wireless users in terms of a parameterized model for use with analytic and simulation studies involving wireless LAN traffic.
Abstract: This paper presents and analyzes user behavior and network performance in a public-area wireless network using a workload captured at a well-attended ACM conference. The goals of our study are: (1) to extend our understanding of wireless user behavior and wireless network performance; (2) to characterize wireless users in terms of a parameterized model for use with analytic and simulation studies involving wireless LAN traffic; and (3) to apply our workload analysis results to issues in wireless network deployment, such as capacity planning, and potential network optimizations, such as algorithms for load balancing across multiple access points (APs) in a wireless network.

566 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Mar 2004
TL;DR: A novel and efficient data structure, neighbor graphs, is described, which dynamically captures the mobility topology of a wireless network as a means for prepositioning the station's context ensuring that the station’s context always remains one hop ahead.
Abstract: User mobility in wireless data networks is increasing because of technological advances, and the desire for voice and multimedia applications. These applications, however, require fast handoffs between base stations to maintain the quality of the connections. Previous work on context transfer for fast handoffs has focused on reactive methods, i.e. the context transfer occurs after the mobile station has associated with the next base station or access router. In this paper, we describe the use of a novel and efficient data structure, neighbor graphs, which dynamically captures the mobility topology of a wireless network as a means for prepositioning the station's context ensuring that the station's context always remains one hop ahead. From experimental and simulation results, we find that the use of neighbor graphs reduces the layer 2 handoff latency due to reassociation by an order of magnitude from 15.37ms to 1.69ms, and that the effectiveness of the approach improves dramatically as user mobility increases.

322 citations

01 Jul 2005
TL;DR: This document presents the Context Transfer Protocol (CXTP) that enables authorized context transfers that reduces latency and packet losses, and to avoid the re-initiation of signaling to and from the mobile node.
Abstract: This document presents the Context Transfer Protocol (CXTP) that enables authorized context transfers. Context transfers allow better support for node based mobility so that the applications running on mobile nodes can operate with minimal disruption. Key objectives are to reduce latency and packet losses, and to avoid the re-initiation of signaling to and from the mobile node. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.

166 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Mar 2004
TL;DR: A week-long traffic trace was collected in January 2003, recording address and protocol information for every packet sent and received on the wireless network to answer questions about where, when, how much, and for what the network is being used.
Abstract: We present the results of an analysis of the usage of our new campus-wide wireless network. A week-long traffic trace was collected in January 2003, recording address and protocol information for every packet sent and received on the wireless network. A centralised authentication log was used to match packets with wireless access points. The trace was analysed to answer questions about where, when, how much, and for what our wireless network is being used. Such information is important in evaluating design principles and planning for future network expansion.

137 citations