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A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses, Barry L. Perryman, Quentin D. Skinner. Indigenous Rangeland Management Press, Lander, WY, USA (2007), 256, US$39.99. paper. ISBN 0-940936-99-2

01 Feb 2008-Rangelands (Society for Range Management)-Vol. 30, Iss: 1

AbstractBook Review: A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses, Barry L. Perryman, Quentin D. Skinner. Indigenous Rangeland Management Press, Lander, WY, USA (2007).

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Summary

  • Indigenous Rangeland Management Press, Lander, WY, USA.
  • Field biologists and resource managers who need to identify the predominant grasses on Nevada's rangelands will appreciate A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses.
  • This book uses a combination of text and high-quality photos to easily meet that goal.
  • They abandon the traditional approach of using extensive taxonomic language to identify the specifi c grass tribe and genus.
  • That is, the fi rst 59 species are classifi ed by their typical growing location in Nevada: species widespread throughout the state; species found in Hot Deserts at low to mid-elevations and mid-to high elevations, respectively; and species in Cold Deserts at low to mid-elevations and mid-to high elevations, respectively.
  • Once users move to the species groups they encounter a consistent identifi cation approach throughout the book.
  • The left-hand page includes all of the taxonomic text used to describe the species.
  • The page opposite the taxonomic description has numerous photographs that aid species identifi cation.
  • The general format has one close-up photo of either the whole plant or its infl orescence and one photo of the general landscape setting in which the species occurs.
  • The font is larger than used in most taxonomic books and the text is double spaced.
  • The book has a soft cover but the binding is solid, and is both sewn and glued.
  • Field manuals by nature receive punishment and the quality of this one's materials suggests it will endure fi eld use well.

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Book Review: A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses,
Barry L. Perryman, Quentin D. Skinner
Item Type text; Book review
Authors Schultz, Brad
Citation Schultz, B. (2008). Book Review: A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses,
Barry L. Perryman, Quentin D. Skinner. Rangelands, 30(1), 43-44.
DOI 10.2111/1551-501X(2008)30[43:BR]2.0.CO;2
Publisher Society for Range Management
Journal Rangelands
Rights Copyright © Society for Range Management.
Download date 10/08/2022 01:12:09
Item License http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Version Final published version
Link to Item http://hdl.handle.net/10150/640527

February
February
2008
2008
43
43
BOOK REVIEW
A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses. By Barry L. Perryman and Quentin D. Skinner. 2007. Indigenous
Rangeland Management Press, Lander, WY, USA. 256 p. US$39.99. paper. ISBN 0-940936-99-2.
Field biologists and resource managers who need to identify the predominant grasses on Nevada’s
rangelands will appreciate A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses. This excellent fi eld guide is particularly
applicable to individuals who lack an extensive background in plant taxonomy but need to know the
grasses they encounter. The high quality and taxonomic value of this guide are evident on the cover. The
detailed photos of an Indian ricegrass seed and fl oret are repeated for every species in the book.
A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses covers 118 grass species found on Nevada’s rangelands. Most, if
not all, of the species described also occur in one or more adjoining states; thus, this guide is widely
applicable beyond Nevada. Good fi eld identifi cation guides are equally valuable to users with and without
taxonomic skills. This book uses a combination of text and high-quality photos to easily meet that goal.
The authors’ approach begins in the Table of Contents. They abandon the traditional approach of using
extensive taxonomic language to identify the specifi c grass tribe and genus. Rather, they divided the 118
species into ten groups based on their probable geographic and/or topographic location. That is, the fi rst
59 species are classifi ed by their typical growing location in Nevada: species widespread throughout the
state; species found in Hot Deserts at low to mid-elevations and mid- to high elevations, respectively;
and species in Cold Deserts at low to mid-elevations and mid- to high elevations, respectively. The
remaining 59 species are classifi ed into species groups typically restricted to montane to subalpine settings,
subalpine to alpine areas, riparian zones, dry to wet meadows, introduced forage species, and species found
in nonspecifi c landscape settings. Nontaxonomists only need to identify their general geographic and/or
geomorphic location to move to the section that identifi es the species they have probably encountered.
This approach is substantially easier than wading through the extensive taxonomic language used by
traditional grass identifi cation texts.
Once users move to the species groups they encounter a consistent identifi cation approach throughout
the book. All species descriptions and photos occur on pages that face one another. A user of this guide
will never have to read text on one page and then turn to another page to look at the accompanying
photos. The only time a page must be turned is to look at another species or use the glossary to clarify
a term. The left-hand page includes all of the taxonomic text used to describe the species. A consistent
four-paragraph approach identifi es 1) morphological characteristics that identify the tribe, 2) common
vegetative descriptions for the species, 3) standard fl oral descriptions, and 4) information about the species
ecology and topographic/geomorphologic location on the landscape. There is a metric ruler (mm and cm
increments) at the bottom of each page for measurement of specifi c plant parts. The font is larger than
typically found in taxonomic texts, a characteristic greatly appreciated by nontaxonomists. The page
opposite the taxonomic description has numerous photographs that aid species identifi cation. The
general format has one close-up photo of either the whole plant or its infl orescence and one photo of the
general landscape setting in which the species occurs. On occasion, the landscape setting photo is absent;
however, the topographic description on the opposing page is vivid enough to create a mental picture of
the plants typical landscape setting.
Additional photos clearly illustrate important characteristics of the panicle, spikelet, fl oret, and/or
ligule used to identify the species. These photos are crystal clear, well labeled, and occur with a black
background that enhances contrast and clarity. The photos typically have equal or better clarity,
and are better labeled, than the line diagrams in Intermountain Flora; the Manual of the Grasses
of the United States; and the Jepson Manual, Higher Plants of California. Furthermore,
the photos color often shows subtle differences between plant parts that can help species
identifi cation.
A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses has a 13-page glossary of the taxonomic terms and is
relatively easy to read. The terms are printed in bold and the simple and clear defi nitions are
usually well under two lines in length. The font is larger than used in most taxonomic books
and the text is double spaced. There is an extensive index that includes both scientifi c and
common names in alphabetical order, as independent entries. Common names are in a bold
font, which makes them easy to separate from scientifi c names, thus aiding the search for
specifi c species.
For a fi eld guide, the overall construction is good. The book has a soft cover but the binding
is solid, and is both sewn and glued. The pages are printed on high quality, relatively thick,

Rangelands
Rangelands
44
6 inches by 9 inches glossy paper that will not easily tear.
Field manuals by nature receive punishment and the quality
of this one’s materials suggests it will endure fi eld use well.
I highly recommend A Field Guide to Nevada Grasses for
all who wish to identify grasses throughout Nevada. The
guide covers most grass species in Nevada and the very high
quality photos of small, hard-to-see features greatly aid
identifi cation for those with and without schooling in the
identifi cation of grass plants.
Brad Schultz, Society for Range Management, Nevada
Section, Winnemucca, NV, USA.
!
Citations
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ReportDOI
01 Nov 2011
Abstract: : Over the past few years, a series of Regional Supplements to the 1987 U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) Wetland Delineation Manual have been published, and currently the National Wetland Plant List is being updated. To support these efforts, we generated a list of floras and field guides for each USACE region Alaska, Arid West, Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain, Caribbean, Eastern Mountains and Piedmont, Great Plains, Midwest, Northcentral and Northeast, Pacific Islands, and Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast. Each list includes regional floras, state floras, local floras, regional field guides, state field guides, and local field guides. We also prepared a list of floras and field guides that cover the entire U.S. This list is divided into the following categories: forbs, shrubs, trees, grasses and sedges, ferns, orchids, cacti and agave, and references and help guides. The flora and field guide lists can serve as tools for wetland delineation and restoration, assigning of wetland indicator statuses to vegetation species, and other vegetation activities.

63 citations


01 Jan 2017

25 citations


References
More filters


ReportDOI
01 Nov 2011
Abstract: : Over the past few years, a series of Regional Supplements to the 1987 U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) Wetland Delineation Manual have been published, and currently the National Wetland Plant List is being updated. To support these efforts, we generated a list of floras and field guides for each USACE region Alaska, Arid West, Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain, Caribbean, Eastern Mountains and Piedmont, Great Plains, Midwest, Northcentral and Northeast, Pacific Islands, and Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast. Each list includes regional floras, state floras, local floras, regional field guides, state field guides, and local field guides. We also prepared a list of floras and field guides that cover the entire U.S. This list is divided into the following categories: forbs, shrubs, trees, grasses and sedges, ferns, orchids, cacti and agave, and references and help guides. The flora and field guide lists can serve as tools for wetland delineation and restoration, assigning of wetland indicator statuses to vegetation species, and other vegetation activities.

63 citations


01 Jan 2017

25 citations