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A history of Arabic literature

01 Jan 1903-
TL;DR: A chronological study of the history of Arabic literature can be found in this paper, with a brief discourse on geographical and cultural influences on Arabic writers, and touching on the earliest forms of pre-Islamic poetry.
Abstract: This book is a chronological study of the history of Arabic literature. Beginning with a brief discourse on geographical and cultural influences on Arabic writers, and touching on the earliest forms of pre-Islamic poetry, the author continues with a deeper study of the 'golden age' of Arabic literature, when writers and artists flourished under the Omeyyad and Abbasid dynasties. Later chapters are devoted to the medieval period, and a final section looks to the future. First published in 1903, this work remains a standard, concise history of Arabic literature. Its author, Clement Huart, Professor of Oriental Languages in Paris, was one of the most accomplished orientalists of his day, and was a leading authority on Arabic, Persian, Turkish and Romaic literature.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 1924, the doors of the medreses of Turkey were ordered closed by the Grand National Assembly of Turkey as mentioned in this paper, and the century-old movement to modernize and secularize Turkish education reached a crucial watershed with the abandonment of the traditional Islamic system of mektebs and medrees.
Abstract: In 1924 the doors of the medreses of Turkey were ordered closed by the Grand National Assembly. The century-old movement to modernize and secularize Turkish education reached a crucial watershed with the abandonment of the traditional Islamic system of mektebs and medreses. The bifurcation which had characterized Ottoman education since the early nineteenth century and which had been reflected in the empire's educated elite could not be tolerated in the new, secular republic envisaged by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

20 citations

Dissertation
01 Mar 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed an aesthetic approach for the study of the British Orientalist discourse in relation to Arabic classical literature, and explored three literary eras; Pre colonialism, colonialism, and Post colonialism, adopting Hans Robert Jauss's theorisation of ‘literary history' as a theoretical framework.
Abstract: The primary aim of this thesis is to develop an aesthetic approach for the study of the British Orientalist discourse in relation to Arabic classical literature. The thesis explores three literary eras; Pre colonialism, colonialism, and Post colonialism, adopting Hans Robert Jauss’s theorisation of ‘literary history’ as a theoretical framework. The theoretical framework of the thesis is, also, informed by Edward Said’s seminal contributions to the subject, though without necessarily endorsing all his assumptions and conclusions. The thesis is divided into six chapters. In Chapter 1, Juass’s assumption in its relation to literary history is explored, displaying how it can be a valuable framework to study the history of the British Orientalist discourse. Chapter 2 is designed to examine Edward Said’s understanding of Orientalism, by exploring his supporters-opponents’ views. The last three Chapters are organized to investigate the contributions made by the British Orientalists and critique of the impact these contributions had on our understanding of Arabic literature. The thesis is concluded by chapter six, which summarizes the important findings of the work. The key finding of the study is that although there are disparate responses in dealing with classical Arabic literature, most British scholars belong to the same pure academic school of knowledge. This knowledge has accumulated systematically over a long period of research and it is still being built upon. What is most remarkable about this academic knowledge is that it was produced without political involvement.

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Elliott Colla1
TL;DR: A History Compass conference cluster tracing the formation of national culture in Egypt was organized by the Middle East Centre (St. Antony's), The Faculty of Oriental Studies, The Khalid bin ‘Abdullah Al-Sa’ud Professorship (Professor Clive Holes), and The Centre for Political Ideologies as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: This paper is part of a History Compass conference cluster tracing the formation of national culture in Egypt. Guest edited by Walter Armbrust, this cluster of articles was originally part of a conference in Oxford on January 12–13, 2007, organized by Walter Armbrust, Ronald Nettler, and Lucie Ryzova, and funded by the Middle East Centre (St. Antony’s), The Faculty of Oriental Studies, The Khalid bin ‘Abdullah Al-Sa’ud Professorship (Professor Clive Holes), and The Centre for Political Ideologies. The cluster is made up of the following articles:

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the reasons and the factors that mainly led to Arab women diminution in Arabic literature, such as the tribal conflicts, Umayyad caliphate and its battle against Abbasids caliphate after death of Muhammad, marrying women for pleasure and treating them as a sexual tool.
Abstract: This article is about the reasons and the factors that mainly led to many terrible effects on Arab women diminution in Arabic literature, such as the tribal conflicts, Umayyad caliphate and its battle against Abbasids caliphate after death of Muhammad, marrying women for pleasure and treating them as a sexual tool, in the Arabian Peninsula beginning from the pre- Islamic era to the modern era of Arabic literature. Furthermore, it also clarifies many women situations during those eras and their participations in many different events in battles by healing the injured people, helping their husbands in order to stop Muhammad’s teachings and his tradition regardless paying attention to pursue education and learn poetry due these chippy reasons, resulting in many bad education and increasing level of analphabetism quickly in addition to their situations during the great engagement which happened between Umayyad dynasty and Abassids dynasty. It also elucidates how technology and revolution of information in the twentieth century, as well as after the second world war, led to many great results on Arab women’s appearance, lately, especially in Saudi Arabia in media, press, drama, journalism and their involutions on developing Arabic literature including all its literary forms as well as their contributions of children literature appearance during the twentieth century.

18 citations