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Proceedings ArticleDOI

A Knowledge Based Critic For Evaluation Of Architectural floor-plans

28 Aug 1991-Vol. 3, pp 309-314
TL;DR: CAFE - a knowledge based Critic for Architectural Floor-plan Evaluation provides textual-criticism by evaluating floor-plans of residential buildings with respect to different factors of function-utility, basic planning principles and client expectations.
Abstract: Critiquing is the process of providing reasoned opinion on an object. it is essential as a supplementary problem solving activity in any co-operative problem solving environment to provide selective portions of knowledge to the u@ers In the form of "why not" kind of explanations. In this article, we discuss about CAFE - a knowledge based Critic for Architectural Floor-plan Evaluation. It provides textual-criticism by evaluating floor-plans of residential buildings with respect to different factors of function-utility, basic planning principles and client expectations. Floor-plan evaluation is a complex task that requires to model different components of knowledge there is a need to handle abstractions and the problem solving behavior required by the critic is quite; complex requiring a dynamic agenda based approach that allows identification of goals from the given situation. This forms the motivation for building a knowledge based system for It. We discuss in detail about this system CAFE, the underlying assumptions, types of critic rules handled, knowledge representation and the problem solving scheme followed. We also present a typical scenario with CAPE. Finally, we analyze the system and propose extensions.
References
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1984-
TL;DR: RUP’s TMS aiso ensures that there is an entry on a contradiction queue for every propositional clause all of whose atoms are false.
Abstract: A truth maintenance system (TMS) is used to record justifications for assertions. Such justifications can be used to generate explanations and to track down the assumptions underlying assertions. In RUP every justification is a disjunctive clause of sentential (propositional) atoms and any such clause can be treated as a justification. RUP’s TMS takes a set of such propositional clauses and performs propositional constraint propagation to ensure that every assertion with a valid justification is in fact believed by the system (thus ensuring a deduction invariant). RUP’s TMS aiso ensures that there is an entry on a contradiction queue for every propositional clause all of whose atoms are false.

114 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The critiquing approach to building knowledge-based interactive systems, which discusses critics from the perspective of overcoming the problems of high-functionality computer systems, of providing a new class of systems to support learning, of extending applications-oriented construction kits to design environments, and of providing an alternative to traditional autonomous expert systems are described.
Abstract: We describe the critiquing approach to building knowledge-based interactive systems. Critiquing supports computer users in their problem solving and learning activities. The challenges for the next generation of knowledge-based systems provide a context for the development of this paradigm. We discuss critics from the perspective of overcoming the problems of high-functionality computer systems, of providing a new class of systems to support learning, of extending applications-oriented construction kits to design environments, and of providing an alternative to traditional autonomous expert systems. One of the critiquing systems we have built—JANUS, a critic for architectural design—is used as an example for presenting the key aspects of the critiquing process. We then survey additional critiquing systems developed in our and other research groups. The paper concludes with a discussion of experiences and extensions to the paradigm.

90 citations


Book
Perry L. Miller1
01 Jan 1986-
TL;DR: The use of computers has become well established in hospital financial record keeping, and also in more patient-oriented administrative functions such as admitting, bed allocation, and in pathology and radiology information systems.
Abstract: Over the past 25 years, computers have brought major changes to medicine. These changes are most evident in the administrative side of medical practice. The use of computers has become well established in hospital financial record keeping, and also in more patient-oriented administrative functions such as admitting, bed allocation, etc. In addition, the computer is being used increas-ingly to store clinical data, for instance, for laboratory test reporting, and in pathology and radiology information systems.

57 citations