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Journal ArticleDOI

A native at home and abroad: the history, politics, ethics and aesthetics of acacias

TL;DR: Anthropogenic introductions of Australian Acacia spp.
Abstract: Aim Anthropogenic introductions of Australian Acacia spp. that become classed as alien invasive species have consequences besides the physical, spatial and ecological: there are also cultural, ethi ...
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Elton's "The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants" as mentioned in this paper is one of the most cited books on invasion biology, and it provides an accessible, engaging introduction to the most important environmental crises of our time.
Abstract: Much as Rachel Carson's \"Silent Spring\" was a call to action against the pesticides that were devastating bird populations, Charles S. Elton's classic \"The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants\" sounded an early warning about an environmental catastrophe that has become all too familiar today-the invasion of nonnative species. From kudzu to zebra mussels to Asian long-horned beetles, nonnative species are colonizing new habitats around the world at an alarming rate thanks to accidental and intentional human intervention. One of the leading causes of extinctions of native animals and plants, invasive species also wreak severe economic havoc, causing $79 billion worth of damage in the United States alone. Elton explains the devastating effects that invasive species can have on local ecosystems in clear, concise language and with numerous examples. The first book on invasion biology, and still the most cited, Elton's masterpiece provides an accessible, engaging introduction to one of the most important environmental crises of our time. Charles S. Elton was one of the founders of ecology, who also established and led Oxford University's Bureau of Animal Population. His work has influenced generations of ecologists and zoologists, and his publications remain central to the literature in modern biology. \"History has caught up with Charles Elton's foresight, and \"The Ecology of Invasions\" can now be seen as one of the central scientific books of our century.\"-David Quammen, from the Foreword to \"Killer Algae: The True Tale of a Biological Invasion\

1,321 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is found that conflicts surrounding invasive species arose based largely on differences in value systems and to a lesser extent stakeholder and decision maker's risk perceptions, and it is suggested that the plurality of environmental values should be integrated into invasive species research and management via structured decision making techniques.
Abstract: Decision makers and researchers recognize the need to effectively confront the social dimensions and conflicts inherent to invasive species research and management. Yet, despite numerous contentious situations that have arisen, no systematic evaluation of the literature has examined the commonalities in the patterns and types of these emergent social issues. Using social and ecological keywords, we reviewed trends in the social dimensions of invasive species research and management and the sources and potential solutions to problems and conflicts that arise around invasive species. We integrated components of cognitive hierarchy theory and risk perceptions theory to provide a conceptual framework to identify, distinguish, and provide understanding of the driving factors underlying disputes associated with invasive species. In the ISI Web of Science database, we found 15,915 peer-reviewed publications on biological invasions, 124 of which included social dimensions of this phenomenon. Of these 124, 28 studies described specific contentious situations. Social approaches to biological invasions have emerged largely in the last decade and have focused on both environmental social sciences and resource management. Despite being distributed in a range of journals, these 124 articles were concentrated mostly in ecology and conservation-oriented outlets. We found that conflicts surrounding invasive species arose based largely on differences in value systems and to a lesser extent stakeholder and decision maker's risk perceptions. To confront or avoid such situations, we suggest integrating the plurality of environmental values into invasive species research and management via structured decision making techniques, which enhance effective risk communication that promotes trust and confidence between stakeholders and decision makers.

277 citations


Cites background from "A native at home and abroad: the hi..."

  • ...As such, their meaning and significance have varied over time and among social groups (Carruthers et al. 2011)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In a recent special issue of Diversity and Distributions as mentioned in this paper, 20 papers focused on the global cross-disciplinary experiment of introduced Australian acacias (1012 recognized species native to Australia) have been moved extensively around the world by humans over the past 250 years.
Abstract: Aim Australian acacias (1012 recognized species native to Australia, which were previously grouped in Acacia subgenus Phyllodineae) have been moved extensively around the world by humans over the past 250 years. This has created the opportunity to explore how evolutionary, ecological, historical and sociological factors interact to affect the distribution, usage, invasiveness and perceptions of a globally important group of plants. This editorial provides the background for the 20 papers in this special issue of Diversity and Distributions that focusses on the global cross-disciplinary experiment of introduced Australian acacias. Location Australia and global. Methods The papers of the special issue are discussed in the context of a unified framework for biological invasions. Distributions of species were mapped across Australia, their representation in bioclimatic zones examined and the potential global distribution of the group modelled. By collating a variety of different lists, we determined which Australian acacias have reached different stages in the introduction-naturalization-invasion continuum in different parts of the world. Paradigms and key research questions relating to barriers to invasion, stages of invasion and management perceptions are sketched. Results According to our global database of Australian acacia records, 386 species have been moved outside Australia by human agency, 71 species are naturalized or weedy, and 23 are unequivocally invasive. Climatic models suggest that about a third of the world’s land surface is climatically suitable for Australian acacias. Many species are commercially important crops or are useful for other purposes and have been extensively planted, and many different human perceptions of Australian acacias exist in different parts of the world. The papers in the special issue cover all the barriers, stages and processes that define biological invasions and touch on many aspects: history and the human dimension; aspects of the species pool; species traits; biotic interactions; climate and niche; and management. Main conclusions Australian acacias are an excellent model group for examining interactions between evolutionary, ecological and socio-economic drivers of species introductions. New insights have emerged on the biological, ecological and evolutionary correlates of naturalization and invasion, but human usage factors permeate all explanatory models. Understanding and managing introduced Australian acacias requires a fundamental and integrative appreciation of both intrinsic (e.g. species traits) and extrinsic (e.g. human usage and perceptions) aspects.

260 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Global efforts to minimize the risk and limit the impact of invasions in this widely used plant group are reviewed.
Abstract: Aim Many Australian Acacia species have been planted around the world, some are highly valued, some are invasive, and some are both highly valued and invasive. We review global efforts to minimize the risk and limit the impact of invasions in this widely used plant group.

192 citations


Cites background from "A native at home and abroad: the hi..."

  • ...The focus on identifying generic management approaches to minimize invasion risk should be viewed as one aspect of the broader discussion on Australian acacia introductions and read with reference to other papers in this special issue of Diversity and Distributions that describe the beneficial and cultural aspects of wattle introductions (Carruthers et al., 2011; Griffin et al., 2011; Kull et al., 2011)....

    [...]

  • ...…of the broader discussion on Australian acacia introductions and read with reference to other papers in this special issue of Diversity and Distributions that describe the beneficial and cultural aspects of wattle introductions (Carruthers et al., 2011; Griffin et al., 2011; Kull et al., 2011)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the different uses and perceptions of introduced Australian acacias (wattles; Acacia subgenus Phyllodineae) by rural households and communities.
Abstract: Aim To examine the different uses and perceptions of introduced Australian acacias (wattles; Acacia subgenus Phyllodineae) by rural households and communities. Location Eighteen landscape-scale case studies around the world, in Vietnam, India, Reunion, Madagascar, South Africa, Congo, Niger, Ethiopia, Israel, France, Portugal, Brazil, Chile, Dominican Republic and Hawai‘i. Methods Qualitative comparison of case studies, based on questionnaire sent to network of acacia researchers. Information based on individual knowledge of local experts, published and unpublished sources. Results We propose a conceptual model to explain current uses and perceptions of introduced acacias. It highlights historically and geographically contingent processes, including economic development, environmental discourses, political context, and local or regional needs. Four main groupings of case studies were united by similar patterns: (1) poor communities benefiting from targeted agroforestry projects; (2) places where residents, generally poor, take advantage of a valuable resource already present in their landscape via plantation and/or invasion; (3) regions of small and mid-scale tree farmers participating in the forestry industry; and (4) a number of high-income communities dealing with the legacies of former or niche use of introduced acacia in a context of increased concern over biodiversity and ecosystem services. Main conclusions Economic conditions play a key role shaping acacia use. Poorer communities rely strongly on acacias (often in, or escaped from, formal plantations) for household needs and, sometimes, for income. Middle-income regions more typically host private farm investments in acacia woodlots for commercialization. Efforts at control of invasive acacias must take care to not adversely impact poor dependent communities.

177 citations


Cites background from "A native at home and abroad: the hi..."

  • ...Many of these factors are highly interrelated, operate at multiple scales and depend on particular historical and geographical context (also see Carruthers et al., 2011)....

    [...]

  • ...The current values of introduced acacias in diverse rural communities around the world are complex outcomes of historically and geographically contingent processes that integrate plant ecology, economic development, political context and culture (Kull & Rangan, 2008; Carruthers et al., 2011)....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI

4,002 citations


"A native at home and abroad: the hi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...This has been suggested to some extent by Elton (1958: 145), Larson (2007b and 2010), and Hattingh (2011). If one adopts this viewpoint, and can figure out its implications in the practice of invasion biology, then it is possible that invasion biology might function less as a normative science merely reflecting societal values in pursuit of a conservation agenda....

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Book
01 Jan 1966
TL;DR: The Order of Things as mentioned in this paper is one of the most significant works of the twenty-first century, and it was the seminal work of Foucault's later work on power and discourse that established his reputation as an intellectual giant.
Abstract: When one defines "order" as a sorting of priorities, it becomes beautifully clear as to what Foucault is doing here With virtuoso showmanship, he weaves an intensely complex history of thought He dips into literature, art, economics and even biology in The Order of Things, possibly one of the most significant, yet most overlooked, works of the twentieth century Eclipsed by his later work on power and discourse, nonetheless it was The Order of Things that established Foucault's reputation as an intellectual giant Pirouetting around the outer edge of language, Foucault unsettles the surface of literary writing In describing the limitations of our usual taxonomies, he opens the door onto a whole new system of thought, one ripe with what he calls "exotic charm" Intellectual pyrotechnics from the master of critical thinking, this book is crucial reading for those who wish to gain insight into that odd beast called Postmodernism, and a must for any fan of Foucault

3,863 citations


"A native at home and abroad: the hi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...As Michel Foucault expounded, it is almost impossible to avoid discourse because it is the vocabulary that delivers and communicates issues around power relationships (Foucault, 1970)....

    [...]

  • ...As Michel Foucault expounded, it is almost impossible to avoid discourse because it is the vocabulary that delivers and communicates issues around power relationships (Foucault, 1970)....

    [...]

03 Jan 2005

2,757 citations

Book
06 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The first book on invasion biology, and still the most cited, Elton's masterpiece provides an accessible, engaging introduction to one of the most important environmental crises of the authors' time.
Abstract: Much as Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring" was a call to action against the pesticides that were devastating bird populations, Charles S. Elton's classic "The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants" sounded an early warning about an environmental catastrophe that has become all too familiar today-the invasion of nonnative species. From kudzu to zebra mussels to Asian long-horned beetles, nonnative species are colonizing new habitats around the world at an alarming rate thanks to accidental and intentional human intervention. One of the leading causes of extinctions of native animals and plants, invasive species also wreak severe economic havoc, causing $79 billion worth of damage in the United States alone. Elton explains the devastating effects that invasive species can have on local ecosystems in clear, concise language and with numerous examples. The first book on invasion biology, and still the most cited, Elton's masterpiece provides an accessible, engaging introduction to one of the most important environmental crises of our time. Charles S. Elton was one of the founders of ecology, who also established and led Oxford University's Bureau of Animal Population. His work has influenced generations of ecologists and zoologists, and his publications remain central to the literature in modern biology. "History has caught up with Charles Elton's foresight, and "The Ecology of Invasions" can now be seen as one of the central scientific books of our century."-David Quammen, from the Foreword to "Killer Algae: The True Tale of a Biological Invasion"

2,530 citations