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Journal ArticleDOI

A note on exceptionally high confamilial naticid drilling frequency on Natica gualteriana from the Indian subcontinent

15 Sep 2014-Historical Biology (Taylor & Francis)-Vol. 26, Iss: 6, pp 758-764
TL;DR: The different aspects of confamilial predation from the Indian coasts were studied and showed that the predators in Chandipur were highly efficient as evident from high drilling frequency (DF), site stereotypy and low prey effectiveness.
Abstract: Although common, confamilial naticid predation intensity was not very high in the geological record. Here, we gathered modern confamilial predation data from the Indian coasts and showed that confamilial naticid predation on a naticid species, Natica gualteriana, is exceptionally high at Chandipur, one of our studied areas. We studied the different aspects of confamilial predation from the Indian coasts and showed that the predators in Chandipur were highly efficient as evident from high drilling frequency (DF), site stereotypy and low prey effectiveness. Unusually high DF on N. gualteriana may be attributed to its new arrival in Chandipur where it faced competitive elimination through predation by sympatric naticid predators. Reports of failed invasion are rare. Natica gualteriana is a small invader and therefore its invasion success is threatened by resident populations of large species that extensively drill on young individuals of N. gualteriana just to break the bottleneck of their own offspring from...
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Detailed quantitative analyses of the present study revealed that N. tigrina attacks opportunistically on all infaunal and epifaunal intertidal bivalve and gastropod prey taxa, indicating that the predator was highly efficient.

29 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors report on drilling predation using an extensive collection of Cretaceous-Quaternary barnacles (>50,000 specimens) and find 312 drill holes of predatory origin in Eocene-Holocene wall and opercular plates of balanomorph and scalpellomorph barnacles.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The ontogenetic development of cannibalistic habit is closely linked to the evolutionary stable strategy (ESS) and such factors should also be taken into consideration while studying cannibalism in the context of drilling predation.

23 citations


Cites background from "A note on exceptionally high confam..."

  • ...Das et al. (2013) reported confamilial predation on Natica gualterina from this tidal flat....

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Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 2017-PALAIOS
TL;DR: In this paper, data compiled from previously published sources, supplemented by unpublished museum collections, document different aspects of naticid confamilial predation in a temporal-latitudinal context.
Abstract: Gastropod drilling predation in the fossil record is prevalent and has been documented by many workers; however, vivid documentation of confamilial naticid predation is poor. Here, data compiled from previously published sources, supplemented by unpublished museum collections, document different aspects of naticid confamilial predation (NCP) in a temporal-latitudinal context. Confamilial drilling frequency (DF) showed a Cretaceous low, a small rise to a stable plateau in the Eocene, followed by a peak in the Oligocene, and finally a drop to a stable level from the Miocene to the Holocene. The stepwise rise in DF is comparable with the overall history of drilling predation. However, the temporal increase in DF was visible only in the mid-latitudes, while in other latitudes, no temporal trend was observed. The frequency of failed attack has always been very low. In comparison, a decrease in prey effectiveness (PE) was observed in the Neogene relative to the Cretaceous and Paleocene–Eocene intervals. In case of site selectivity, either apertural or abapertural sites were targeted until the Oligocene, and subsequently became more random. Some of these trends may be biased based on insufficient site selectivity data as well as uneven sampling from different latitudes representing different time intervals. More data on quantification of predation intensities along with the behavioral aspects of NCP are required to properly document other aspects of this interaction.

16 citations


Cites background from "A note on exceptionally high confam..."

  • ...…one naticid gastropod attacks another naticid gastropod—is also common in the fossil record as well as in the modern seas (Online Supplemental Data Table 1; Kelley 1991; Dietl and Alexander 1995, 2000; Christie 2009; Martinell et al. 2010; Das et al. 2014; Mallick et al. 2014; Pahari et al. 2016)....

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  • ...Variation in DF values may indicate spatio-environmental control on drilling (Harries and Schopf 2007; Paul et al. 2013; Das et al. 2014; Brown et al. 2014; Visaggi and Kelley 2015; Pahari et al. 2016)....

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  • ...In the present study, to test for site selectivity of NCP for each taxon at each time interval, the total number of holes present at apertural (AP; sites I and IV) and abapertural (AB, sites II and III) sites were noted (Das et al. 2014)....

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  • ...1, Table 1; Hoffman and Martinell 1984; Fortunato 2007; Martinell et al. 2010; Das et al. 2014; Pahari et al. 2016); within this last phase, DF remained almost unchanged (one-way ANOVA, F¼ 0.25, p¼ 0.91)....

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  • ...…1978; Hansen and Kelley 1995; Dietl and Kelley 2001; Alexander and Dietl 2001; Kelley and Hansen 2007; Paul et al. 2013; Martinell et al. 2010; Das et al. 2014; Visaggi and Kelley 2015); (2) the observed temporal trend in drilling predation might be an artifact of changes in DF taking place…...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A classificatory scheme to categorize the repaired traces on the basis of intensity of the damage is developed and a model to analyze how the severity of scars can be effectively used to study species’ adaptation against shell breaking causes is provided, by using Mactra violacea as a studied species.
Abstract: Non-lethal shell damage, which is preserved as repair scars on the bivalve shell, can be predatory or non-predatory in origin. When the peeling crabs are the main predatory groups, non-predatory damages are produced by impact from the saltating clasts or by wear and tear during burrowing. In both cases, these repair scars almost look alike, and it is difficult to identify which factor is causally responsible. Because survival of an individual is related to the severity of the shell-break irrespective of the cause, here, we have developed a classificatory scheme to categorize the repaired traces on the basis of intensity of the damage. Moreover, we have provided a model to analyze how the severity of scars can be effectively used to study species’ adaptation against shell breaking causes, by using Mactra violacea as a studied species. Individuals who survive shell breakage may adapt to escalated morphological traits to resist damage in the long term. Subhronil Mondal. School of Geosciences, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave. NES107, Tampa, FL 33620-5250, USA. subhronil.m@gmail.com Subhendu Bardhan. Department of Geological Sciences, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032, India. sbardhan12@gmail.com Sumanta Mallick. Department of Geological Sciences, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032, India. sumanta.geol87@gmail.com Arindam Roy. Department of Geological Sciences, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032, India. addy.geol@gmail.com

14 citations


Cites background from "A note on exceptionally high confam..."

  • ...A diverse assemblage of predators and prey inhabit this area (Mondal et al., 2010b; Das et al., 2014)....

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References
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Book
21 May 1987
TL;DR: Geerat Vermeij demonstrates that escalation--the process by which species adapt to, or are limited by, their enemies as the latter increase in ability to acquire and retain resources--has been a dominant theme in the history of life despite frequent episodes of extinction.
Abstract: Here is one biologist's interpretation of the chronology of life during the last six hundred million years of earth history: an extended essay that draws on the author's own data and a wide-ranging literature survey to discuss the nature and dynamics of evolutionary change in organisms and their biological surroundings. Geerat Vermeij demonstrates that escalation--the process by which species adapt to, or are limited by, their enemies as the latter increase in ability to acquire and retain resources--has been a dominant theme in the history of life despite frequent episodes of extinction.

983 citations


"A note on exceptionally high confam..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The frequency of unsuccessful drillholes or PE has been defined as a ratio between total incomplete drillholes and total number of attempted holes (see Vermeij 1987; Kelley et al. 2001)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The substantial increase of snail-shell sturdiness beginning in the Early Cretaceous has accompanied, and was perhaps in response to, the evolution of powerful, relatively small, shell-destroying predators such as teleosts, stomatopods, and decapod crustaceans.
Abstract: Tertiary and Recent marine gastropods include in their ranks a complement of mechanically sturdy forms unknown in earlier epochs. Open coiling, planispiral coiling, and umbilici detract from shell sturdiness, and were commoner among Paleozoic and Early Meso- zoic gastropods than among younger forms. Strong external sculpture, narrow elongate aper- tures, and apertural dentition promote resistance to crushing predation and are primarily as- sociated with post-Jurassic mesogastropods, neogastropods, and neritaceans. The ability to remodel the interior of the shell, developed primarily in gastropods with a non-nacreous shell structure, has contributed greatly to the acquisition of these antipredatory features. The substantial increase of snail-shell sturdiness beginning in the Early Cretaceous has accompanied, and was perhaps in response to, the evolution of powerful, relatively small, shell-destroying predators such as teleosts, stomatopods, and decapod crustaceans. A simul- taneous intensification of grazing, also involving skeletal destruction, brought with it other fundamental changes in benthic community structure in the Late Mesozoic, including a trend toward infaunalization and the disappearance or environmental restriction of sessile animals which cannot reattach once they are dislodged. The rise and diversification of angiosperms and the animals dependent on them for food coincides with these and other Mesozoic events in the marine benthos and plankton. The new predators and prey which evolved in conjunction with the Mesozoic reorganiza- tion persisted through episodes of extinction and biological crisis. Possibly, continental breakup and the wide extent of climatic belts during the Late Mesozoic contributed to the conditions favorable to the evolution of skeleton-destroying consumers. This tendency may have been exaggerated by an increase in shelled food supply resulting from the occupation of new adaptive zones by infaunal bivalves and by shell-inhabiting hermit crabs. Marine communities have not remained in equilibrium over their entire geological history. Biotic revolutions made certain modes of life obsolete and resulted in other adaptive zones becoming newly occupied.

923 citations

01 Jan 1981

289 citations


"A note on exceptionally high confam..." refers background in this paper

  • ...gualteriana was fatal and suffered targeted drilling predation by other naticids at Chandipur. In many cases, interspecific competition may lead to catastrophic reduction of the ecologically less superior species. Success of invasive species depends on its body size (Roy et al. 2002). As Schröder et al. (2009) have shown, size distribution of the poeciliid fishes influences their ability to invade....

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  • ...gualteriana was fatal and suffered targeted drilling predation by other naticids at Chandipur. In many cases, interspecific competition may lead to catastrophic reduction of the ecologically less superior species. Success of invasive species depends on its body size (Roy et al. 2002). As Schröder et al. (2009) have shown, size distribution of the poeciliid fishes influences their ability to invade. They experimentally observed that ‘large invaders established persistent populations and drove the resident population to extinction in 10 out of 12 cases, while small invaders failed in 10 out of 12 trials. Stable coexistence was virtually absent’. In another study, it was observed that, after the introduction of the American grey squirrel in the nineteenth century, there are hardly any native red squirrels left in Britain, within a time span of only 100 years (Clarkson 1998; p. 41). Here, also, the grey squirrel is holding advantage over native fauna because of its larger size. In case of marine invertebrates (e.g. bivalves), large bodied species were more likely to be successful invaders (Roy et al. 2001, 2002). This advantage may be due to the fact that the large body size is positively correlated with colonisation success, fecundity and latitudinal range (Jablonski 1996; Roy et al. 2002). To avoid competitive elimination, the species maintain their body sizes very close to Hutchinson’s ratio (1:1.28; Hari et al. 2009). Maximum body size (height of shell used as proxy for body size and was calculated from our collection) ratios of N. gualteriana and three other most abundant naticid species in Chandipur were N. gualteriana: N. tigrina 1⁄4 1:1.85, N. gualteriana: N. lineata 1⁄4 1:1.75 and N. gualteriana: P. didyma 1⁄4 1:2.54. It appeared that the ratios were far away from Hutchinson’s ratio and N. gualteriana in Chandipur was extremely vulnerable for competitive elimination mainly through predation (cannibalism by the larger species). Natica gualteriana showed escalation at least in increase in body size since Pleistocene. Kabat and Kohn (1986) reported fossil N....

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11 Jan 1981
TL;DR: The nombre de la pista fosil (ichnotaxon) is basado en la morfologia de la estructura, mientras el taxon biologico represents the posicion filogenetica que se interpreta del organismo causante as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: La clasificacion de las pistas fosiles requiere un doble sistema de nomenclatura. El nombre de la pista fosil (ichnotaxon) esta basado en la morfologia de la estructura, mientras que el taxon biologico representa la posicion filogenetica que se interpreta del organismo causante. Los dos sistemas de nomenclatura no se pueden intercambiar, y ambos son necesarios para la completa clasificacion de la pista. A muchas de estas pistas no les ha sido aun atribuido unichnotaxon descriptivo, pero ya que las pistas fosiles re quieren nombres si han de ser tratadas sistematicamente, se ofrece comunmente en tales casos un biotaxon interpretativo en lugar del ichnotaxon que no se ha descritotodavia Este procedimiento tiende a desviar la atencion de la verdadera naturaleza de la pista fosil e implica una falsa exactitud en la determinacion filogenetica, lo cual conduce a conclusiones paleobiologicas poco seguras. Estos puntos quedan bien ilustrados por el ejemplo de unas perforaciones pequeiias y redondas sobre conchas. Son pistas fosiles abundantes y, no teniendo ichnotaxon, tienden a ser relacionadas con la accion perforante de los gasteropedos-naticidos y muricidos-sobre conchas. Sin embargo, varios grupos mas de gasteropodos producen perforaciones redondas, al igual que los cefalopodos octopodos, turbelarios, nematodos y braquiopodos articulados, pero su accion es poco conocida. Antes de embarcarse en tales especulaciones, como son los organismos causantes, es necesario un ichnotaxon para atraer la atencion hacia estas pistas fosiles y aumentarel rigorde su tratamiento. Solo cuando su morfologia y distribucion sean mejor conocidas estaremos en una posicion mejor para discutir sus atribuciones filogeneticas.

272 citations

01 Jan 1981
TL;DR: This synthesis is concerned primarily with naticacean and muricacean borers that excavate smooth, round, beveled holes and the role of tubular salivary glands, hypobranchial glands, and anterior pedal mucous glands in shell penetration is uncertain.
Abstract: Predatory gastropod shell borers occur among the Capulidae, Naticacae, Tonnacea, Muricacea, and Vayssiereidae. With the exception of boring nudibranchs, all known gastropod borers are shelled. This synthesis is concerned primarily with naticacean and muricacean borers that excavate smooth, round, beveled holes. They occur in every coastal region of the world that has been examined, and identify prey chemoreceptively. The shell penetrating mechanism includes at least an accessory boring organ (ABO) and radula. The ABO is located in three separate anatomical regions in different groups of borers: in muricaceans, in the sole of the foot antenor to the ventral pedal gland or atop the ventral pedal gland; in naticaceans, under the tip of the proboscis. Studies of the ABO of several species of naticacean and muricacean snails reveal a common ultrastructural form. An acid (possibly HOI) and unidentified chelating agents and enzymes in a hypertonic mucoid secretion released by the ABO are hypothesized to dissolve shell during hole boring. All 33 species of naticacean and muricacean snails examined possess an ABO and are shell borers; the ABO does not appear to have evolved in other shell penetrating molluscs. The role of tubular salivary glands (missing in some muricids and naticids), hypobranchial glands, and anterior pedal mucous glands in shell penetration is uncertain. Borers release paralytic substances from the hypobranchial gland, and possibly also from other glands associated with the proboscis. Gastropods known to bore holes in prey shell date from the Jurassic and perhaps the late Triassic, some two hundred million years ago. Progress is being made in the control of commercially important species of muricaceans, but not of naticaceans.

234 citations