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Journal ArticleDOI

A quasi-optimal convergence result for fracture mechanics with XFEM

01 Apr 2006-Comptes Rendus Mathematique (Elsevier Masson)-Vol. 342, Iss: 7, pp 527-532
TL;DR: Chahine et al. as discussed by the authors gave a convergence result for a variant of the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) on cracked domains using a cut-off function to localize the singular enrichment area.
About: This article is published in Comptes Rendus Mathematique.The article was published on 2006-04-01 and is currently open access. It has received 33 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Extended finite element method & Rate of convergence.

Summary (1 min read)

1. Introduction

  • Classical finite element methods used for modeling crack propagation are subjected to several constraints: the mesh should match the crack geometry, should always evolve with the crack growth and should be refined near the crack tip.
  • This motivated Moës, Dolbow and Belytschko to introduce an approach called XFEM (eXtended Finite Element Method) in 1999 (see [11]).
  • The idea is to add singular functions to the finite element basis taking into account the singular behavior around the crack tip, and a step function modeling the discontinuity of the displacement field across the crack.
  • This is not an improvement of the convergence order of the classical finite element method solution (see [8,13]).
  • This later method can even realize better convergence results for the computation of the stress intensity factors (see [3]).

2. Model problem

  • The authors consider the linear elasticity problem on this domain for an isotropic material.
  • The normal (respectively tangential) component of the function uI (respectively uII) is discontinuous along the crack.
  • They both correspond to the well known I and II opening modes for a bi-dimensional crack (see [9,10]).

3. XFEM: description and discretized problem

  • The idea of XFEM is to use a classical finite element space enriched by some additional functions.
  • These functions result from the product of global enrichment functions and some classical finite element functions (see [11]).

4. Error estimate

  • Let the displacement field u, solution to problem (1), satisfy the condition (2).
  • Note that a similar work has been done in [7], but for a domain totally cut by the crack, which means that the domain does not contain a crack tip.
  • Thus the interpolation operator the authors defined allows us to make a classical interpolation over each part of the triangle, and to have the same optimal rate of convergence obtained in the classical global interpolation theorem (see [2,4,12]).

5. Concluding remarks

  • (ii) Let us note that the work presented in [12] is applied to a mesh respecting the crack geometry.
  • Thus it does not involve the problem presented here of the triangles partially enriched by the Heaviside function.
  • On the other hand, this note offers an improvement for the ‘classical’ XFEM method where the convergence rate remains of order √ h for some reasons detailed in [8].

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the extended and generalized finite element methods are reviewed with an emphasis on their applications to problems in material science: fracture, dislocations, grain boundaries and phase interfaces.
Abstract: The extended and generalized finite element methods are reviewed with an emphasis on their applications to problems in material science: (1) fracture, (2) dislocations, (3) grain boundaries and (4) phases interfaces. These methods facilitate the modeling of complicated geometries and the evolution of such geometries, particularly when combined with level set methods, as for example in the simulation growing cracks or moving phase interfaces. The state of the art for these problems is described along with the history of developments.

718 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a review of the literature on finite element fracture models and their application in the field of finite element finite element models (FEM) and fracture mechanics.
Abstract: Dedication. Preface . Nomenclature . Chapter 1 Introduction. 1.1 ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES. 1.2 ANALYSIS OF DISCONTINUITIES. 1.3 FRACTURE MECHANICS. 1.4 CRACK MODELLING. 1.4.1 Local and non-local models. 1.4.2 Smeared crack model. 1.4.3 Discrete inter-element crack. 1.4.4 Discrete cracked element. 1.4.5 Singular elements. 1.4.6 Enriched elements. 1.5 ALTERNATIVE TECHNIQUES. 1.6 A REVIEW OF XFEM APPLICATIONS. 1.6.1 General aspects of XFEM. 1.6.2 Localisation and fracture. 1.6.3 Composites. 1.6.4 Contact. 1.6.5 Dynamics. 1.6.6 Large deformation/shells. 1.6.7 Multiscale. 1.6.8 Multiphase/solidification. 1.7 SCOPE OF THE BOOK. Chapter 2 Fracture Mechanics, a Review. 2.1 INTRODUCTION. 2.2 BASICS OF ELASTICITY. 2.2.1 Stress-strain relations. 2.2.2 Airy stress function. 2.2.3 Complex stress functions. 2.3 BASICS OF LEFM. 2.3.1 Fracture mechanics. 2.3.2 Circular hole. 2.3.3 Elliptical hole. 2.3.4 Westergaard analysis of a sharp crack. 2.4 STRESS INTENSITY FACTOR, K . 2.4.1 Definition of the stress intensity factor. 2.4.2 Examples of stress intensity factors for LEFM. 2.4.3 Griffith theories of strength and energy. 2.4.4 Brittle material. 2.4.5 Quasi-brittle material. 2.4.6 Crack stability. 2.4.7 Fixed grip versus fixed load. 2.4.8 Mixed mode crack propagation. 2.5 SOLUTION PROCEDURES FOR K AND G . 2.5.1 Displacement extrapolation/correlation method. 2.5.2 Mode I energy release rate. 2.5.3 Mode I stiffness derivative/virtual crack model. 2.5.4 Two virtual crack extensions for mixed mode cases. 2.5.5 Single virtual crack extension based on displacement decomposition. 2.5.6 Quarter point singular elements. 2.6 ELASTOPLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS (EPFM). 2.6.1 Plastic zone. 2.6.2 Crack tip opening displacements (CTOD). 2.6.3 J integral. 2.6.4 Plastic crack tip fields. 2.6.5 Generalisation of J . 2.7 NUMERICAL METHODS BASED ON THE J INTEGRAL. 2.7.1 Nodal solution. 2.7.2 General finite element solution. 2.7.3 Equivalent domain integral (EDI) method. 2.7.4 Interaction integral method. Chapter 3 Extended Finite Element Method for Isotropic Problems. 3.1 INTRODUCTION. 3.2 A REVIEW OF XFEM DEVELOPMENT. 3.3 BASICS OF FEM. 3.3.1 Isoparametric finite elements, a short review. 3.3.2 Finite element solutions for fracture mechanics. 3.4 PARTITION OF UNITY. 3.5 ENRICHMENT. 3.5.1 Intrinsic enrichment. 3.5.2 Extrinsic enrichment. 3.5.3 Partition of unity finite element method. 3.5.4 Generalised finite element method. 3.5.5 Extended finite element method. 3.5.6 Hp-clouds enrichment. 3.5.7 Generalisation of the PU enrichment. 3.5.8 Transition from standard to enriched approximation. 3.6 ISOTROPIC XFEM. 3.6.1 Basic XFEM approximation. 3.6.2 Signed distance function. 3.6.3 Modelling strong discontinuous fields. 3.6.4 Modelling weak discontinuous fields. 3.6.5 Plastic enrichment. 3.6.6 Selection of nodes for discontinuity enrichment. 3.6.7 Modelling the crack. 3.7 DISCRETIZATION AND INTEGRATION. 3.7.1 Governing equation. 3.7.2 XFEM discretization. 3.7.3 Element partitioning and numerical integration. 3.7.4 Crack intersection. 3.8 TRACKING MOVING BOUNDARIES. 3.8.1 Level set method. 3.8.2 Fast marching method. 3.8.3 Ordered upwind method. 3.9 NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS. 3.9.1 A tensile plate with a central crack. 3.9.2 Double edge cracks. 3.9.3 Double internal collinear cracks. 3.9.4 A central crack in an infinite plate. 3.9.5 An edge crack in a finite plate. Chapter 4 XFEM for Orthotropic Problems. 4.1 INTRODUCTION. 4.2 ANISOTROPIC ELASTICITY. 4.2.1 Elasticity solution. 4.2.2 Anisotropic stress functions. 4.2.3 Orthotropic mixed mode problems. 4.2.4 Energy release rate and stress intensity factor for anisotropic. materials. 4.2.5 Anisotropic singular elements. 4.3 ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR NEAR CRACK TIP. 4.3.1 Near crack tip displacement field (class I). 4.3.2 Near crack tip displacement field (class II). 4.3.3 Unified near crack tip displacement field (both classes). 4.4 ANISOTROPIC XFEM. 4.4.1 Governing equation. 4.4.2 XFEM discretization. 4.4.3 SIF calculations. 4.5 NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS. 4.5.1 Plate with a crack parallel to material axis of orthotropy. 4.5.2 Edge crack with several orientations of the axes of orthotropy. 4.5.3 Single edge notched tensile specimen with crack inclination. 4.5.4 Central slanted crack. 4.5.5 An inclined centre crack in a disk subjected to point loads. 4.5.6 A crack between orthotropic and isotropic materials subjected to. tensile tractions. Chapter 5 XFEM for Cohesive Cracks. 5.1 INTRODUCTION. 5.2 COHESIVE CRACKS. 5.2.1 Cohesive crack models. 5.2.2 Numerical models for cohesive cracks. 5.2.3 Crack propagation criteria. 5.2.4 Snap-back behaviour. 5.2.5 Griffith criterion for cohesive crack. 5.2.6 Cohesive crack model. 5.3 XFEM FOR COHESIVE CRACKS. 5.3.1 Enrichment functions. 5.3.2 Governing equations. 5.3.3 XFEM discretization. 5.4 NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS. 5.4.1 Mixed mode bending beam. 5.4.2 Four point bending beam. 5.4.3 Double cantilever beam. Chapter 6 New Frontiers. 6.1 INTRODUCTION. 6.2 INTERFACE CRACKS. 6.2.1 Elasticity solution for isotropic bimaterial interface. 6.2.2 Stability of interface cracks. 6.2.3 XFEM approximation for interface cracks. 6.3 CONTACT. 6.3.1 Numerical models for a contact problem. 6.3.2 XFEM modelling of a contact problem. 6.4 DYNAMIC FRACTURE. 6.4.1 Dynamic crack propagation by XFEM. 6.4.2 Dynamic LEFM. 6.4.3 Dynamic orthotropic LEFM. 6.4.4 Basic formulation of dynamic XFEM. 6.4.5 XFEM discretization. 6.4.6 Time integration. 6.4.7 Time finite element method. 6.4.8 Time extended finite element method. 6.5 MULTISCALE XFEM. 6.5.1 Basic formulation. 6.5.2 The zoom technique. 6.5.3 Homogenisation based techniques. 6.5.4 XFEM discretization. 6.6 MULTIPHASE XFEM. 6.6.1 Basic formulation. 6.6.2 XFEM approximation. 6.6.3 Two-phase fluid flow. 6.6.4 XFEM approximation. Chapter 7 XFEM Flow. 7.1 INTRODUCTION. 7.2 AVAILABLE OPEN-SOURCE XFEM. 7.3. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS. 7.3.1 Defining the model. 7.3.2 Creating the finite element mesh. 7.3.3 Linear elastic analysis. 7.3.4 Large deformation. 7.3.5 Nonlinear (elastoplastic) analysis. 7.3.6 Material constitutive matrix. 7.4 XFEM. 7.4.1 Front tracking. 7.4.2 Enrichment detection. 7.4.3 Enrichment functions. 7.4.4 Ramp (transition) functions. 7.4.5 Evaluation of the B matrix. 7.5 NUMERICAL INTEGRATION. 7.5.1 Sub-quads. 7.5.2 Sub-triangles. 7.6 SOLVER. 7.6.1 XFEM degrees of freedom. 7.6.2 Time integration. 7.6.3 Simultaneous equations solver. 7.6.4 Crack length control. 7.7 POST-PROCESSING. 7.7.1 Stress intensity factor. 7.7.2 Crack growth. 7.7.3 Other applications. 7.8 CONFIGURATION UPDATE. References . Index

314 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an overview and recent progress of the extended finite element method X-FEM in the analysis of crack growth modeling, and summarize the important milestones achieved by the finite element community in the arena of computational fracture mechanics.

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a review of the extended finite element method X-FEM for computational fracture mechanics, and discuss the basic ideas and formulation for the newly developed XFEM method.

131 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a method for simulating quasistatic crack propagation in 2D which combines the extended finite element method (XFEM) with a general algorithm for cutting triangulated domains, and introduce a simple yet general and flexible quadrature rule based on the same geometric algorithm.
Abstract: We present a method for simulating quasistatic crack propagation in 2-D which combines the extended finite element method (XFEM) with a general algorithm for cutting triangulated domains, and introduce a simple yet general and flexible quadrature rule based on the same geometric algorithm. The combination of these methods gives several advantages. First, the cutting algorithm provides a flexible and systematic way of determining material connectivity, which is required by the XFEM enrichment functions. Also, our integration scheme is straightforward to implement and accurate, without requiring a triangulation that incorporates the new crack edges or the addition of new degrees of freedom to the system. The use of this cutting algorithm and integration rule allows for geometrically complicated domains and complex crack patterns. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

102 citations

References
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TL;DR: In this article, the methodes are numeriques and the fonction de forme reference record created on 2005-11-18, modified on 2016-08-08.
Abstract: Keywords: methodes : numeriques ; fonction de forme Reference Record created on 2005-11-18, modified on 2016-08-08

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TL;DR: The finite element method has been applied to a variety of nonlinear problems, e.g., Elliptic boundary value problems as discussed by the authors, plate problems, and second-order problems.
Abstract: Preface 1. Elliptic boundary value problems 2. Introduction to the finite element method 3. Conforming finite element methods for second-order problems 4. Other finite element methods for second-order problems 5. Application of the finite element method to some nonlinear problems 6. Finite element methods for the plate problem 7. A mixed finite element method 8. Finite element methods for shells Epilogue Bibliography Glossary of symbols Index.

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01 Apr 2002
TL;DR: In this article, Ciarlet presents a self-contained book on finite element methods for analysis and functional analysis, particularly Hilbert spaces, Sobolev spaces, and differential calculus in normed vector spaces.
Abstract: From the Publisher: This book is particularly useful to graduate students, researchers, and engineers using finite element methods. The reader should have knowledge of analysis and functional analysis, particularly Hilbert spaces, Sobolev spaces, and differential calculus in normed vector spaces. Other than these basics, the book is mathematically self-contained. About the Author Philippe G. Ciarlet is a Professor at the Laboratoire d'Analyse Numerique at the Universite Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris. He is also a member of the French Academy of Sciences. He is the author of more than a dozen books on a variety of topics and is a frequent invited lecturer at meetings and universities throughout the world. Professor Ciarlet has served approximately 75 visiting professorships since 1973, and he is a member of the editorial boards of more than 20 journals.

8,052 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a displacement-based approximation is enriched near a crack by incorporating both discontinuous elds and the near tip asymptotic elds through a partition of unity method.
Abstract: SUMMARY An improvement of a new technique for modelling cracks in the nite element framework is presented. A standard displacement-based approximation is enriched near a crack by incorporating both discontinuous elds and the near tip asymptotic elds through a partition of unity method. A methodology that constructs the enriched approximation from the interaction of the crack geometry with the mesh is developed. This technique allows the entire crack to be represented independently of the mesh, and so remeshing is not necessary to model crack growth. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the utility and robustness of the proposed technique. Copyright ? 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

5,815 citations