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A Reassessment of the Location of the Mural Paintings in the Caliphal Palace of Samarra

07 Oct 2020-Der Islam (De Gruyter)-Vol. 97, Iss: 2, pp 367-404
TL;DR: In this paper, the location of the paintings in the Caliphal Palace of Samarra has been analyzed and the authors have shown that the paintings were found in both private areas of the complex and in a few public ones.
Abstract: Abstract The mural paintings discovered in the Caliphal Palace of the ʿAbbāsid city of Samarra constitute a rare example of figural decoration in an urban Islamic palace as well as one of the most important testimonies to Medieval mural paintings that have come down to us from the region. However, as with the rest of the Samarra finds, these paintings suffered significant damage and were published several years after their excavation (Herzfeld, E., Die Malereien von Samarra, Berlin 1927). Although valuable in many respects, this publication presents a breach of methodology, as it does not attend to either the archaeological or architectural contexts. It also contains several information gaps and inaccuracies. One of the main issues not properly addressed is the exact location of the paintings within the building. Researching various archival and museum collections and taking into account studies on the interpretation of the palace layout, this analysis has shown that the location of the paintings is much more complex than indicated in the publication; these were found in both private areas of the complex and in a few public ones too. This is confirmed by some medieval texts, which provide important information for the study of this material.
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01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: The Palais du Calife a Sāmarrā (Iraq) as mentioned in this paper is a museum dedicated to Iraq's National Museum of Science and Information Technology (NSTI).
Abstract: Description precise des elements architecturaux du Palais du Calife a Sāmarrā (Iraq), puis discussion sur les sources litteraires fournissant plusieurs noms pour ce palais, ou mentionnant parfois 2 palais sans aucun rapport pour certains, etroitement lies pour les autres.

11 citations


"A Reassessment of the Location of t..." refers background in this paper

  • ...See Fundjournal: https://sova.si.edu/details/ FSA....

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  • ...5 Essentially Northedge 1993, 143‒171, and Northedge 2005, 133‒150; also Susa 1948, I, 66‒71....

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  • ...9 During the reign of al-Muʿtamid (870‒892), the occupied area of the palace seems to have been reduced, and the square building might have become a private residence, see Northedge 1993, 146....

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  • ...53 See for example Die Malereien, Chap....

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  • ...See al-Maqrīzī, Taqī al-Dīn Aḥmad b. ʿAlī (1924), al-Mawāʾiz wa-l-iʿtibār fī dhikr al-khiţaţ wa-lāthār, ed. by Muhammad Zinhom and Madiha al-Sharqawi, rev.by Ahmad Ahmad Ziyada, Cairo, vol.1, 873‒876. converted into a strictly private residential space at a later stage....

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Book
31 Dec 2007
TL;DR: In this article, the integration of Central Asia into the Islamic empire during the VIIIth and IXth c. is analyzed through the history of its nobility and military elites, both Iranian and Turkish, taking part in the government of the Muslim Empire in Iraq.
Abstract: L'integration de l'Asie centrale dans le monde musulman est ici analysee a travers le sort de ses elites nobiliaires et militaires, aussi bien iraniennes que turques, au VIIIe et au IXe siecle. Celles-ci parviennent au pouvoir en Iraq avec les califes Ma'mun et Mu'tasim. Elles transposent a Bagdad et Samarra leurs hierarchies centre-asiatiques et les elites abbassides sont pendant un demi-siecle sous leur influence. Mais la desagregation lente du systeme militaire organise autour d'elles a Samarra conduit aux troubles des annees 860. Le systeme mamelouk nait apres 870 de sa mutation afin de mieux maitriser les gardes turcs. The integration of Central Asia into the Islamic empire during the VIIIth and IXth c. is here analyzed through the history of its nobility and military elites. With the caliphs Ma'mun and Mu'tasim, these nobles and soldiers, both Iranian and Turkish, took part in the government of the Muslim Empire in Iraq. They brought to Baghdad and Samarra their Central Asian hierarchies and the Abbasid elites were under their influences for half a century. But the slow decay of this Central Asian military system in Samarra gave way to the political disorders of the 860's. The mamluk system was then created in the 870's to better manage the Turkish cavalrymen.

9 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...73 See De la Vaissière 2007, 192....

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