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Journal ArticleDOI

A small dielectric resonator antenna

01 Oct 2002-IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation (IEEE)-Vol. 50, Iss: 10, pp 1485-1487
TL;DR: By covering a cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna with a metallic cap, the resonant frequency of the antenna can be reduced by 30.6% as discussed by the authors, which finds applications in designing small antennas for wireless communication systems.
Abstract: By covering a cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna with a metallic cap, the resonant frequency of the antenna can be reduced by 30.6%. The result finds applications in designing small antennas for wireless communication systems.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the theoretical performance limit for small antenna performance has been validated by all available experimental evidence and the theoretical predictions for the performance due to design factors such as permittivity, aspect ratio, and the internal structure of the antenna are also supported by the experimental evidence.
Abstract: The theoretical limit for small antenna performance that was derived decades ago by Wheeler and Chu governs design tradeoffs for size, bandwidth, and efficiency. Theoretical guidelines have also been derived for other details of small antenna design such as permittivity, aspect ratio, and even the nature of the internal structure of the antenna. In this paper, we extract and analyze experimental performance data from a large body of published designs to establish several facts that have not previously been demonstrated: (1) The theoretical performance limit for size, bandwidth, and efficiency are validated by all available experimental evidence. (2) Although derived for electrically small antennas, the same theoretical limit is also generally a good design rule for antennas that are not electrically small. (3) The theoretical predictions for the performance due to design factors such as permittivity, aspect ratio, and the internal structure of the antenna are also supported by the experimental evidence. The designs that have the highest performance are those that involve the lowest permittivity, have an aspect ratio close to unity, and for which the fields fill the minimum size enclosing sphere with the greatest uniformity. This work thus validates the established theoretical design guidelines.

255 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a broadband, low profile dielectric resonator antenna with a stepped microstrip feed is presented. But the antenna size is not reduced by using metallic strips or patches.
Abstract: This paper presents a novel broadband, low-profile dielectric resonator antenna using relatively low dielectric constant substrate material. The rectangular DRA is fed with a stepped microstrip feed to ensure efficient coupling. Bandwidths in excess of 17% are obtained. In addition, the paper investigates methods to miniaturize the antenna using metallic strips or patches. Substantial size reduction is demonstrated while maintaining a reasonable bandwidth. Simulations as well as experimental results are presented.

145 citations


Cites background from "A small dielectric resonator antenn..."

  • ...Furthermore, investigations carried out by [12] showed that by incorporating a metallic cap on the top surface of a cylindrical DRA, the resonant frequency of the DRA can be reduced by 30....

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  • ...If desired, dielectric resonator antennas can be made more compact, at the expense of reduction in bandwidth, by placing a conducting strip or patch on the top of the DRA [11, 12, 20]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the solid-state procedure is used to produce bulk ceramics of CCTO (CaCu3Ti4O12), which are studied by X-ray powder diffraction and infrared and Raman scattering spectroscopy.
Abstract: The solid-state procedure is used to produce bulk ceramics of CCTO (CaCu3Ti4O12). The samples of the CCTO ceramic are studied by X-ray powder diffraction and infrared and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The infrared and Raman scattering spectroscopy confirm the formation of the CCTO phase, as seen by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. One experimental procedure uses an organic binder in the process of shaping the samples. In the second procedure, the samples were prepared without the presence of the organic phase, and we obtained a higher dielectric constant (K = 7370) with higher loss (D = 0.2) at 1 KHz. For the first procedure, a lower dielectric constant (K = 1530) and lower loss (D = 0.11) at 1 KHz were obtained. Simple rectangular antenna prototypes were also designed on substrate samples (C1, C2, P1, and P2). For the antennas with P2, C1, and C2 as substrates, the bandwidth (BW) is 90 MHz (around 3%). The antenna with P1 substrate presents a surprisingly high BW of 270 MHz, which corresponds to a 10% bandwidth. Such a value is in accordance with the requirements for planar antennas in a variety of wireless communication systems such as WLAN, PCS, Wi-Fi, and other protocols. Therefore, these measurements confirm the potential use of such materials for small high-dielectric planar antennas (HDAs). These materials are also attractive for capacitor applications as well as for microelectronics and microwave devices (cellular mobile phones, for example), where miniaturization of the devices is crucial. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microwave Opt Technol Lett 39: 145–150, 2003; Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/mop.11152

63 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A novel optimization algorithm which permits full volumetric antenna design by combining genetic algorithms with a fast hybrid finite element-boundary integral method, and can be interpreted as a three dimensional Pareto optimization scheme and provides the designer with several choices among the best antennas, according to design goals and constraints.
Abstract: There is growing interest for small antennas that concurrently have higher functionality and operability. Multiobjective optimization is an important tool in the design of such antennas since conflicting goals such as higher gain, increased bandwidth, and size reduction must be addressed simultaneously. In this paper, we present a novel optimization algorithm which permits full volumetric antenna design by combining genetic algorithms with a fast hybrid finite element-boundary integral method. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a full three dimensional antenna design is pursued using concurrent shape, size, metallization as well as dielectric and magnetic material volume optimization. In comparison to previous optimization pursuits, our approach employs a wide-frequency sweep using a single geometry model, thus, enhancing speed, along with several discrete material choices for realizable optimized designs. The developed algorithm can be interpreted as a three dimensional Pareto optimization scheme and provides the designer with several choices among the best antennas, according to design goals and constraints. The final designs are associated with very thin (~0.01lambda) material substrates and yield as much as 15% bandwidth using a 0.1lambda--0.4lambda aperture subject to various gain and bandwidth requirements

55 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a comprehensive investigation of research carried out on dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) in the last three and half decades, in an application-oriented approach, is presented.
Abstract: This survey article outlines a comprehensive investigation of research carried out on dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) in the last three and half decades, in an application-oriented approach. DRAs have created a remarkable position in antenna engineering for their adept characteristics like high efficiency, low loss, wide bandwidth, compact size, 3-dimensional modeling flexibility, etc. The use of DRAs for different commercial and defense applications associated with the wireless communication is highlighted in this article. To make a smooth and effective survey article, all the application-oriented DRAs available in the open literature are classified in five different categories like microwave bands, specific frequency, technology, millimeter-wave, and miscellaneous types. The ultimate aims of this review article are as follows: (i) highlights the usability of DRAs for different commercial and defense applications, (ii) helpful for the antenna industries/manufacturers to find out the best DRA for any specific application as per their requirement, and (iii) points out research gap in some application domains which will be quite helpful for future antenna researchers. In the authors' opinion, this survey may be helpful to DRA researchers as such a survey process is not available in the open literature.

52 citations


Cites background from "A small dielectric resonator antenn..."

  • ...Lee et al.(180) have studied a small DRA using aperture coupling....

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  • ...Lee et al.180 have studied a small DRA using aperture coupling....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a practical antenna configuration for use at microwave and millimetre wave frequencies is investigated, which consists of a circular cylindrical dielectric resonator fed by a microstrip feedline through a coupling aperture in the ground plane between them.
Abstract: A practical antenna configuration for use at microwave and millimetre wave frequencies is investigated. It consists of a circular cylindrical dielectric resonator fed by a microstrip feedline through a coupling aperture in the ground plane between them. Several elements, with different physical parameters, operating between 14 and 16GHz were constructed and tested. Experimental results confirm the effective and practical performance of the antenna structure.

168 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a rectangular dielectric-resonator antenna (DRA) with a very low profile (length-to-height ratio /spl ap/6) is presented, which is almost perfectly matched to the 50 /spl Omega/ input and radiates like a magnetic dipole at 11.6 GHz.
Abstract: A rectangular dielectric-resonator antenna (DRA) with a very low profile (length-to-height ratio /spl ap/6) is presented. This aperture-coupled antenna is almost perfectly matched to the 50 /spl Omega/ input and radiates like a magnetic dipole at 11.6 GHz. It is also well matched at 13.0 GHz, but the pattern is more directional due to the influence of a higher order mode. Theoretical antenna patterns, obtained using the FDTD method, compare well with measured patterns in the E and H planes.

49 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the fundamental broadside TM110 mode of an aperture-coupled circular dielectric resonator antenna was studied and the return loss, radiation characteristics, antenna gain and beamwidth of the configuration were measured and discussed.
Abstract: The fundamental broadside TM110 mode of an aperture-coupled circular dielectric resonator antenna is studied. By using high-dielectric-constant material, the DR antenna can be made low-profile with a relatively low resonant frequency. The return loss, radiation characteristics, antenna gain and beamwidth of the configuration are measured and discussed.

49 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
13 Jul 1997
TL;DR: In this article, three novel DRA configurations are described, which radiate in two different fundamental modes, and the overall size of these antennas is considerably smaller than conventional DRAs and makes them very attractive for applications at low frequencies around 1 GHz.
Abstract: Although conventional dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) are quite small for their use at frequencies about 5 GHz or above, their size (volume and weight) becomes quite excessive at low frequencies around 1 GHz or so. Three novel DRA configurations are described. For these reported configurations which radiate in two different fundamental modes, the frequency of the antennas is nearly independent of the height. The overall size of these antennas is considerably smaller than conventional DRAs and makes them very attractive for applications at low frequencies around 1 GHz. Simplified models for the analysis of resonant frequencies of these antennas are given. Experimental results on the return loss and radiation patterns of a few sample antennas are reported.

46 citations