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Journal ArticleDOI

Advance Error by Error, with Erring Steps”: Embracing and Exploring Mistakes and Failure Across the Psychophysical Performer Training Space and the Page

01 Nov 2009-Journal of Writing in Creative Practice (Intellect)-Vol. 2, Iss: 2, pp 193-207
About: This article is published in Journal of Writing in Creative Practice.The article was published on 2009-11-01. It has received 2 citations till now.
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DissertationDOI
31 May 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level in higher education (HE) by using Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops.
Abstract: This thesis offers and evaluates collaborative writing practices for teams of Design students at M-Level in Higher Education (HE). The research begins by asking why writing is included in current art and design HE, and identifies an assumption about the role of writing across the sector derived from a misreading of the 1960 and 1970 Coldstream Reports. As a result, drawing on recommendations that were made in the Reports for non-studio studies to be complementary to art and design practice in HE, I focus on how teams of design students can complement their design skills with collaborative writing. Some studies for addressing how design students learn from writing in HE already exist, but none have established a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level. My research captures the effects of my Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops. I compare these with the most common writing model in HE designed for text-based study in the humanities. My APTs use participants' designerly strengths to redesign how they can use writing to complement their practice. This provides learners with a means of identifying and creating their own situated writing structures and practices. I document how my practice-centred APTs position collaborative writing practices as a designerly mode of communication between design practitioners working in teams. I show it to be more complementary to practice and so more effective in comparison to models imported from the humanities. My explorations are carried out through two thesis sections. Section One is an in-depth literature-based rationale that critically informs my investigations. Section Two presents my methodologies and reports three case studies, in which I explore the emergent data collected through a range of qualitative methods, mapping and evaluative techniques. The findings are of importance to those teaching M-Level design courses.

24 citations


Cites background or methods from "Advance Error by Error, with Erring..."

  • ...as writing Writing as Practice: Practice as Writing Sentences on Christian Bök's Eunoia: writing after language writing, Oulipo and conceptual art 
 (Jaeger, 2009) Discussion paper from the Working Group on Situational Fiction, Chelsea College of Art & Design, University of the Arts London: On the value of Situational Fiction for an artist's writing (Francis, 2009) Advance error by error, with erring steps: embracing and exploring mistakes and failure across the psychophysical performer training space and the page (Clarke, 2009) Holding a mirror to ourselves: how digital networks chAng writiN (Byrne, 2009) Parallel lines: form and field in contemporary artwriting 
 (Mulholland, 2009) Writing as Object: Object as Writing The book objects: writing and performance (Webb, 2009) Glossing Speakers, or bookmaking for amateurs 
 (Leahy, 2009) Hampstead Revisited 
 (Pollard, et....

    [...]

  • ...Both Byrne (2009) and Clarke’s (2009) articles link to the idea of mirroring within writing that has been a useful theme for my approach to this section....

    [...]

  • ...Both Byrne (2009) and Clarke’s (2009) articles link to the idea of mirroring within writing that has been a useful theme for my approach to this section. Jaeger (2009) and Francis (2009) link to the ideas of appropriation of approaches from other disciplines, which is a key element of my approach....

    [...]

  • ...With a focus on the participant in performance practice Alissa Clarke (2009) addresses the role of the language of feedback and “the hierarchical categorization of success, failure, correct and incorrect” (Clarke, 2009:203) in, Advance error by...

    [...]

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Cutler as mentioned in this paper proposes the potential body as a model for performance documentation, since, though difficult to translate into written forms, it offers a more effective communication of both the body and of live performance.
Abstract: In this article, the first of a sequence on the ways in which women's bodies are recorded in performance documentation, Anna Cutler offers a new conception and systematic definition of three performance documentations – the ‘Proper’, the ‘Processual’ and the ‘Residual’. She argues against traditional and literary forms of documentation (the ‘Proper’) as a means by which women and women's bodies have been and continue to be excluded from performance records, and proceeds to discuss two theoretical types of body in performance: the ‘Inscribed’ (which represents an ideologically shaped, constructed, and censored body) and the ‘Potential’ (which represents the creative and ongoing moments of change made by the body in performance). She proposes the ‘Potential Body’ as a model for performance documentation, since, though difficult to translate into written forms, it offers a more effective communication of both the body and of live performance. Given the continuing prevalence of the written word as the primary mode of performance documentation, the author makes a case for ecriture feminine to be appropriated as a writerly tool to document women's bodies and particularly the ‘Potential Body’ in performance. She concludes with a discussion of the theory and practice of Helene Cixous' writing in relation to women's performance methodologies. The debate is taken up by Susan Melrose in the article following this. Anna Cutler is currently producing events for the Belfast Festival, while completing her doctoral research in the Department of Literary and Media Studies at the University of North London.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Melrose as mentioned in this paper argued that the primacy of the word in documentation processes, though contested by Anna Cutler, has none the less caused her to overlook existing, effective forms of performance documentation, perhaps because they originate from and primarily serve the interests of performers rather than academics.
Abstract: Taking up the arguments set out by Anna Cutler in the preceding article, Susan Melrose here cautions against what she sees as the dangers Cutler fails to take into account of nominalization as an inherently conservative process. She suggests that the reification of the term ‘the body’ carries its own dangers, unless its complexities – as suggested by the title of this article – are recognized and assimilated. Arguing that many of the problems identified by Cutler are as applicable to the male as to the female performer, Susan Melrose concludes that the primacy of the word in documentation processes, though contested by Anna Cutler, has none the less caused her to overlook existing, effective forms of performance documentation, perhaps because they originate from and primarily serve the interests of performers rather than academics. Susan Melrose is Senior Lecturer at the Central School of Speech and Drama, where she leads the MA course in Performance Studies. She is author of A Semiotics of the Dramatic Text (Macmillan, 1994), and a contributor to numerous journals and symposia in her field. Further contributions to the debate initiated in these articles are planned and invited.

6 citations