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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1039/D0SC05419D

Advances in anion binding and sensing using luminescent lanthanide complexes

04 Mar 2021-Chemical Science (Royal Society of Chemistry)-Vol. 12, Iss: 8, pp 2716-2734
Abstract: Luminescent lanthanide complexes have been actively studied as selective anion receptors for the past two decades. Ln(iii) complexes, particularly of europium(iii) and terbium(iii), offer unique photophysical properties that are very valuable for anion sensing in biological media, including long luminescence lifetimes (milliseconds) that enable time-gating methods to eliminate background autofluorescence from biomolecules, and line-like emission spectra that allow ratiometric measurements. By careful design of the organic ligand, stable Ln(iii) complexes can be devised for rapid and reversible anion binding, providing a luminescence response that is fast and sensitive, offering the high spatial resolution required for biological imaging applications. This review focuses on recent progress in the development of Ln(iii) receptors that exhibit sufficiently high anion selectivity to be utilised in biological or environmental sensing applications. We evaluate the mechanisms of anion binding and sensing, and the strategies employed to tune anion affinity and selectivity, through variations in the structure and geometry of the ligand. We highlight examples of luminescent Ln(iii) receptors that have been utilised to detect and quantify specific anions in biological media (e.g. human serum), monitor enzyme reactions in real-time, and visualise target anions with high sensitivity in living cells.

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Topics: Anion binding (66%)
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12 results found



Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1039/D1CS00310K
Abstract: The principles of the design of responsive luminescent probes and sensors based on lanthanide emission are summarised, based on a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action. Competing kinetic pathways for deactivation of the excited states that occur are described, highlighting the need to consider each of the salient quenching processes. Such an analysis dictates the choice of both the ligand and its integral sensitising moiety for the particular application. The key aspects of quenching involving electron transfer and vibrational and electronic energy transfer are highlighted and exemplified. Responsive systems for pH, pM, pX and pO2 and selected biochemical analytes are distinguished, according to the nature of the optical signal observed. Signal changes include both simple and ratiometric intensity measurements, emission lifetime variations and the unique features associated with the observation of circularly polarised luminescence (CPL) for chiral systems. A classification of responsive lanthanide probes is introduced. Examples of the operation of probes for reactive oxygen species, citrate, bicarbonate, α1-AGP and pH are used to illustrate reversible and irreversible transformations of the ligand constitution, as well as the reversible changes to the metal primary and secondary coordination sphere that sensitively perturb the ligand field. Finally, systems that function by modulation of dynamic quenching of the ligand or metal excited states are described, including real time observation of endosomal acidification in living cells, rapid urate analysis in serum, accurate temperature assessment in confined compartments and high throughput screening of drug binding to G-protein coupled receptors.

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7 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1039/D1OB00341K
Abstract: Mixed monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles containing surface-bound triethylene glycol and dipicolylamine groups aggregated in water/methanol, 1 : 2 (v/v) in the presence of nucleotides, if the solution also contained zinc(II) nitrate to convert the dipicolylamine units into the corresponding zinc complexes. Nanoparticle aggregation could be followed with the naked eye by the colour change of the solution from red to purple followed by nanoparticle precipitation. The sensitivity was highest for adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which could be detected at concentrations >10 μM, and decreased over adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to adenosine monophosphate (AMP), consistent with the typically higher affinity of zinc(II)-dipicolylamine-derived receptors for higher charged nucleotides. Inorganic sodium diphosphate and triphosphate interfered in the assay by also inducing nanoparticle aggregation. However, while the nucleotide-induced aggregates persisted even at higher analyte concentrations, the nanoparticles that were precipitated with inorganic salts redissolved again when the salt concentration was increased. The thus resulting solutions retained their ability to respond to nucleotides, but they now preferentially responded to AMP. Accordingly, AMP could be sensed selectively at concentrations ≥50 μM in an aqueous environment, even in the presence of other nucleotides and inorganic anions. This work thus introduces a novel approach for the sensing of a nucleotide that is often the most difficult analyte to detect with other assays.

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Topics: Adenosine monophosphate (58%), Adenosine diphosphate (57%), Dipicolylamine (57%) ... show more

2 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1039/D1NH00299F
Guotao Sun1, Yao Xie1, Lining Sun1, Hongjie Zhang2Institutions (2)
29 Jul 2021-
Abstract: Biomolecules play critical roles in biological activities and are closely related to various disease conditions. The reliable, selective and sensitive detection of biomolecules holds much promise for specific and rapid biosensing. In recent years, luminescent lanthanide probes have been widely used for monitoring the activity of biomolecules owing to their long luminescence lifetimes and line-like emission which allow time-resolved and ratiometric analyses. In this review article, we concentrate on recent advances in the detection of biomolecule activities based on lanthanide luminescent systems, including upconversion luminescent nanoparticles, lanthanide-metal organic frameworks, and lanthanide organic complexes. We also introduce the latest remarkable accomplishments of lanthanide probes in the design principles and sensing mechanisms, as well as the forthcoming challenges and perspectives for practical achievements.

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Topics: Lanthanide probes (57%)

2 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1002/CHEM.202100491
Abstract: Anion receptors can be used to transport ions across lipid bilayers, which has potential for therapeutic applications. Synthetic bicarbonate transporters are of particular interest, as defects in transmembrane transport of bicarbonate are associated with various diseases. However, no convenient method exists to directly observe bicarbonate transport and study the mechanisms involved. Here, an assay is presented that allows the kinetics of bicarbonate transport into liposomes to be monitored directly and with great sensitivity. The assay utilises an encapsulated europium(III) complex, which exhibits a large increase in emission intensity upon binding bicarbonate. Mechanisms involving CO2 diffusion and the dissipation of a pH gradient are shown to be able to lead to an increase in bicarbonate concentration within liposomes, without transport of the anion occurring at all. By distinguishing these alternative mechanisms from actual bicarbonate transport, this assay will inform the future development of bicarbonate transporters.

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Topics: Bicarbonate transport (82%), Bicarbonate (63%), Membrane transport (53%) ... show more

2 Citations


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109 results found


Paul D. Beer1, Philip A. Gale2Institutions (2)
02 Feb 2001-Angewandte Chemie
Abstract: Anion recognition chemistry has grown from its beginnings in the late 1960s with positively charged ammonium cryptand receptors for halide binding to, at the end of the millennium, a plethora of charged and neutral, cyclic and acyclic, inorganic and organic supramolecular host systems for the selective complexation, detection, and separation of anionic guest species. Solvation effects and pH values have been shown to play crucial roles in the overall anion recognition process. More recent developments include exciting advances in anion-templated syntheses and directed self-assembly, ion-pair recognition, and the function of anions in supramolecular catalysis.

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Topics: Anion binding (64%), Supramolecular catalysis (57%), Molecular recognition (53%) ... show more

3,145 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1039/B905604C
Abstract: Recent startling interest for lanthanide luminescence is stimulated by the continuously expanding need for luminescent materials meeting the stringent requirements of telecommunication, lighting, electroluminescent devices, (bio-)analytical sensors and bio-imaging set-ups. This critical review describes the latest developments in (i) the sensitization of near-infrared luminescence, (ii) “soft” luminescent materials (liquid crystals, ionic liquids, ionogels), (iii) electroluminescent materials for organic light emitting diodes, with emphasis on white light generation, and (iv) applications in luminescent bio-sensing and bio-imaging based on time-resolved detection and multiphoton excitation (500 references).

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Topics: Luminescence (50%)

2,576 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/BF00928361
Thomas W. Traut1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The concentrations of bases, nucleosides, and nucleosides mono-, di- and tri-phosphate are compared for about 600 published values. The data are predominantly from mammalian cells and fluids. For the most important ribonucleotides average concentrations ±SD (μM) are: ATP, 3,152±1,698; GTP, 468±224; UTP, 567±460 and CTP, 278±242. For deoxynucleosidestriphosphate (dNTP), the concentrations in dividing cells are: dATP, 24±22; dGTP, 5.2±4.5; dCTP, 29±19 and dTTP 37±30. By comparison, dUTP is usually about 0.2 μM. For, the 4 dNTPs, tumor cells have concentrations of 6–11 fold over normal cells, and for the 4 NTPs, tumor cells also have concentrations 1.2–5 fold over the normal cells. By comparison, the concentrations of NTPs are significantly lower in various types of blood cells. The average concentration of bases and nucleosides in plasma and other extracellular fluids is generally in the range of 0.4–6 μM; these values are usually lower than corresponding intracellular concentrations. For phosphate compounds, average cellular concentrations are: Pi, 4400; ribose-1-P, 55; ribose-5-P, 70 and P-ribose-PP, 9.0. The metal ion magnesium, important for coordinating phosphates in nucleotides, has values (mM) of: free Mg2+, 1.1; complexed-Mg, 8.0. Consideration of experiments on the intracellular compartmentation of nucleotides shows support for this process between the cytoplasm and mitochondria, but not between the cytoplasm and the nucleus.

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Topics: Nucleotide (51%)

1,364 Citations


Marco Conti1, Joseph A. Beavo2Institutions (2)
Abstract: Although cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) were described soon after the discovery of cAMP, their complexity and functions in signaling is only recently beginning to become fully realized. We now know that at least 100 different PDE proteins degrade cAMP and cGMP in eukaryotes. A complex PDE gene organization and a large number of PDE splicing variants serve to fine-tune cyclic nucleotide signals and contribute to specificity in signaling. Here we review some of the major concepts related to our understanding of PDE function and regulation including: (a) the structure of catalytic and regulatory domains and arrangement in holoenzymes; (b) PDE integration into signaling complexes; (c) the nature and function of negative and positive feedback circuits that have been conserved in PDEs from prokaryotes to human; (d) the emerging association of mutant PDE alleles with inherited diseases; and (e) the role of PDEs in generating subcellular signaling compartments.

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1,041 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1021/AR0400894
Jean-Claude G. Bünzli1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The recent upsurge of interest in contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, of luminescent chemosensors for medical diagnostic, and lately, for optical imaging of cells has generated an impressive momentum for the coordination and supramolecular chemistry of trivalent lanthanide ions. We shortly review the synthetic methods allowing the introduction of these spherical ions with fascinating optical and magnetic properties into elaborate mono- and polymetallic edifices. We then illustrate these methods by selected examples describing the use of (i) a coronand to produce luminescent liquid crystals, (ii) derivatized calixarenes for 4f−5f element separation, (iii) podates for the production of nanoparticles with high relaxivity and for sensitizing the near-infrared (NIR) emission, and (iv) self-assembly processes for producing functional bimetallic edifices.

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880 Citations


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202111
20061