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Journal ArticleDOI

After the end of art : contemporary art and the pale of history

01 Jun 1998-The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism (Princeton University Press)-Vol. 56, Iss: 3, pp 309-311
TL;DR: The Princeton Classics Edition as discussed by the authors is a collection of illustrations from the Princeton Museum of Modern, Post-Modern, and Contemporary Art with a focus on the history of art and its development.
Abstract: List of Illustrations ix Foreword to the Princeton Classics Edition xi Preface xvii Acknowledgments xxi CHAPTER ONE Introduction: Modern, Postmodern, and Contemporary 3 CHAPTER TWO Three Decades after the End of Art 21 CHAPTER THREE Master Narratives and Critical Principles 41 CHAPTER FOUR Modernism and the Critique of Pure Art: The Historical Vision of Clement Greenberg 61 CHAPTER FIVE From Aesthetics to Art Criticism 81 CHAPTER SIX Painting and the Pale of History: The Passing of the Pure 101 CHAPTER SEVEN Pop Art and Past Futures 117 CHAPTER EIGHT Painting, Politics, and Post-Hisotrical Art 135 CHAPTER NINE The Historical Museum of Monochrome Art 153 CHAPTER TEN Museums and the Thirsting Millions 175 CHAPTER ELEVEN Modalities of History: Possibility and Comedy 193 Index 221
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current state of the descriptive information-processing model, and its relation to the major topics in empirical aesthetics today, including the nature of aesthetic emotions, the role of context, and the neural and evolutionary foundations of art and aesthetics are reviewed.
Abstract: About a decade ago, psychology of the arts started to gain momentum owing to a number of drives: technological progress improved the conditions under which art could be studied in the laboratory, neuroscience discovered the arts as an area of interest, and new theories offered a more comprehensive look at aesthetic experiences. Ten years ago, Leder, Belke, Oeberst, and Augustin (2004) proposed a descriptive information-processing model of the components that integrate an aesthetic episode. This theory offered explanations for modern art's large number of individualized styles, innovativeness, and for the diverse aesthetic experiences it can stimulate. In addition, it described how information is processed over the time course of an aesthetic episode, within and over perceptual, cognitive and emotional components. Here, we review the current state of the model, and its relation to the major topics in empirical aesthetics today, including the nature of aesthetic emotions, the role of context, and the neural and evolutionary foundations of art and aesthetics.

329 citations


Cites background from "After the end of art : contemporary..."

  • ...As Danto (1997) eloquently expressed, ‘the connection between art and aesthetics is a matter of historical contingency, and not part of the essence of art’ (p. 25)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This framework demonstrates that a science of art appreciation must investigate how appreciators process causal and historical information to classify and explain their psychological responses to art and concludes that scientists can tackle fundamental questions about the nature and appreciation of art within the psycho-historical framework.
Abstract: Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the psychological approach, we introduce a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation. This framework demonstrates that a science of art appreciation must investigate how appreciators process causal and historical information to classify and explain their psychological responses to art. Expanding on research about the cognition of artifacts, we identify three modes of appreciation: basic exposure to an artwork, the artistic design stance, and artistic understanding. The artistic design stance, a requisite for artistic understanding, is an attitude whereby appreciators develop their sensitivity to art-historical contexts by means of inquiries into the making, authorship, and functions of artworks. We defend and illustrate the psycho-historical framework with an analysis of existing studies on art appreciation in empirical aesthetics. Finally, we argue that the fluency theory of aesthetic pleasure can be amended to meet the requirements of the framework. We conclude that scientists can tackle fundamental questions about the nature and appreciation of art within the psycho-historical framework.

239 citations


Cites background from "After the end of art : contemporary..."

  • ...…of art (Gombrich 1950/1951; Munro 1968; 1970; Panofsky 1955; Roskill 1976/1989), the sociology of art-historical contexts (Bourdieu 1992/1996; Hauser 1951; Heinich 1996b; Tanner 2003), and art criticism specific to historical situations (Danto 1998a; 2009; Foster 2002; Fried 1998; Greenberg 1961)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work characterize neuroaesthetics as the cognitive neuroscience of aesthetic experience, drawing on long traditions of research in empirical aesthetics on the one hand and cognitive neuroscience on the other, to develop in a way that is mutually complementary to approaches in the humanities.
Abstract: The field of neuroaesthetics has gained in popularity in recent years but also attracted criticism from the perspectives both of the humanities and the sciences. In an effort to consolidate research in the field, we characterize neuroaesthetics as the cognitive neuroscience of aesthetic experience, drawing on long traditions of research in empirical aesthetics on the one hand and cognitive neuroscience on the other. We clarify the aims and scope of the field, identifying relations among neuroscientific investigations of aesthetics, beauty, and art. The approach we advocate takes as its object of study a wide spectrum of aesthetic experiences, resulting from interactions of individuals, sensory stimuli, and context. Drawing on its parent fields, a cognitive neuroscience of aesthetics would investigate the complex cognitive processes and functional networks of brain regions involved in those experiences without placing a value on them. Thus, the cognitive neuroscientific approach may develop in a way that is mutually complementary to approaches in the humanities.

203 citations


Cites background from "After the end of art : contemporary..."

  • ...This dual focus recognizes that art and aesthetics overlap conceptually and historically, but they are not identical: “The connection between art and aesthetics is a matter of historical contingency, and not part of the essence of art” (Danto, 1997, p. 25)....

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MonographDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Kantian aftermath of modern German philosophy is discussed, including the need for necessary conditions for the possibility of what is not: Heidegger on failed meaning, negative ethics, and the unavailability of the ordinary.
Abstract: 1. Introduction: 'bourgeois philosophy' and the problem of the subject Part I: 2. The Kantian aftermath: reaction and revolution in modern German philosophy Part II: 3. Necessary conditions for the possibility of what isn't: Heidegger on failed meaning 4. Gadamer's Hegel: subjectivity and reflection 5. Negative ethics: Adorno on the falseness of bourgeois life 6. The unavailability of the ordinary: Strauss on the philosophical fate of modernity 7. Hannah Arendt and the bourgeois origins of totalitarian evil 8. On not being a neo-structuralist: remarks on Manfred Frank and romantic subjectivity 9. Leaving nature behind: or, two cheers for subjectivism: on John McDowell Part III: 10. The ethical status of civility 11. Medical practice and Social authority in modernity Part IV. Expression: 12. The force of felt necessity: literature, ethical knowledge, and the law 13. What was abstract art? (from the point of view of Hegel) 14. On becoming who one is: Proust's problematic selves.

166 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An integrative view of the early approaches, which identified some of the core mechanisms involved in aesthetic preference are provided, and a framework to accommodate these findings is proposed.

132 citations


Cites background from "After the end of art : contemporary..."

  • ...As noted by Danto (1997), ‘‘the connection between art and aesthetics is a matter of historical contingency, and not part of the essence of art’’ (Danto, 1997, p. 25)....

    [...]

  • ...Instead of a linear scheme of stimulus–activation– appreciation, akin to a bottom-up perceptive ‘‘module’’ postulated by Fodor’s (1983) architecture of mind, we would like to propose a different view, initially grounded on Chatterjee’s (2004b) model....

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