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Journal ArticleDOI

Agricultural impacts and profitability of land consolidations

01 Sep 2016-Land Use Policy (Elsevier Limited)-Vol. 55, Iss: 55, pp 309-317
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors evaluate agricultural impacts and profitability of land consolidations and find that land consolidation is an effective and feasible land management tool for the improvement of property structure and that the average production costs were discovered to decrease 15% due to the significant improvement in property structure.
About: This article is published in Land Use Policy.The article was published on 2016-09-01. It has received 73 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Land management & Land consolidation.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the effectiveness of land consolidation at the farm level in the context of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and found poor effects of land swapping and re-parcelling.

67 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors identify the factors that need to be understood when developing a land consolidation strategy for the specific case of Ghana's rural customary lands and conclude that these factors that differ require ways to be addressed and adapted in order to develop a responsible land consolidation policy for Ghana's customary areas.

59 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyzed the relationship between land fragmentation and farm productivity and found that land fragmentation measured using the Januszewski index has a U-shape relationship to farm productivity.

50 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a case study of Dongfan in Shaanxi Province showed that approximately 60% of the economic benefit was used to demolish and re-construct settlements for peasants, while less than 25% was reserved for the development of rural industries.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Zhang et al. as discussed by the authors used fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to empirically study several combinations of initial livelihood capital endowment after the implementation of different modes of rural land consolidation (RLC).

40 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Land fragmentation, also known as pulverization (Clout 1972: 106), morcellement (De Vries 1974: 11-12), parcellization (Roche 1956), and scattering (Farmer 1960), is the type of land ownership pattern where "a single farm consists of numerous discrete parcels, often scattered over a wide area".
Abstract: Land fragmentation, also known as pulverization (Clout 1972: 106), morcellement (De Vries 1974: 11-12), parcellization (Roche 1956), and scattering (Farmer 1960), is the type of land ownership pattern where "a single farm consists of numerous discrete parcels, often scattered over a wide area" (Binns 1950: 5). Another phenomenon, also known as land fragmenta­ tion, is the division of land into small farms (Clout 1972a: 41; Jacoby 1971: 265). In this paper I discwis the former. Fragmentation is described by agricultural policymakers as "the blackest of evils, to be prevented by legislative action as one would attempt to prevent prostitution or blackmail" (Farmer 1960: 225; cf CEC 1982: 4 1-42; Marsh & Swanney 1980: Ch. 3). Economists, on the other hand, have suggested that land fragmentation is adaptive under certain circumstances but becomes nonadaptive as technology and relative factor costs change (McClosky 1975a,b; O. Johnson 1970). Europeanist geographers, especially those who incorporate historical mate­ rial into their work, tend to agree with the economists. They see fragmenta­ tion as outdated. The size, shape, and distribution of Europe's fields are of medieval origin, and not well-suited to twentieth century machines and labor costs (Thorpe 1951 ; Houston 1953; Clout 1972 a,b; 1984; Schmook 1976; C. Smith 1978; O'Flanagan 1980; Grigg 1983). Non-Europeanist geographers (with anthropologists) usually stress the adaptive, functional role of land

240 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors reviewed the process of land consolidation in Galicia, Spain and found that land consolidation contributes to retaining farmland in agricultural use, although they observed changes in use from cropland to pasture land.

213 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors found that small-sized farms are likely to be more fragmented, and that fragmentation had a negative impact on crop productivity and increased family labour use and other money expenses.
Abstract: Land fragmentation, where a single farm has a number of parcels of land, is a common feature of agriculture in many countries, especially in developing countries. In Vietnam, land fragmentation is common, especially in the north. For the whole country, there are about 75 million parcels of land, an average of seven to eight plots per farm household. Such fragmentation can be seen to have negative and positive benefits for farm households and the community generally. Comparative statics analysis and analysis of survey data have led to the conclusion that small-sized farms are likely to be more fragmented, and that fragmentation had a negative impact on crop productivity and increased family labour use and other money expenses. Policies which allow the appropriate opportunity cost of labour to be reflected at the farm level may provide appropriate incentives to trigger farm size change and land consolidation. Policies which tip the benefits in favour of fewer and larger plots, such as strong and effective research and development, an active extension system and strong administrative management, may also lead to land consolidation.

199 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the specific conditions and various outcomes of land consolidation in three study areas, focusing on the evaluation criteria of land ownership and plot arrangement before and after land consolidation.

160 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the impact of land fragmentation on variable production costs of rice farmers in three villages in Jiangxi Province, P.R. China, and concluded that land consolidation programs can only contribute to the joint policy goals of increasing agricultural production capacity and reducing the rural labor surplus, if such programs are accompanied by measures aimed at creating alternative market opportunities and at providing appropriate off-farm employment opportunities.

135 citations