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Journal ArticleDOI

Algiers in the Age of the Corsairs

01 Sep 1976-History: Reviews of New Books (Taylor & Francis Group)-Vol. 4, Iss: 10, pp 223-224
About: This article is published in History: Reviews of New Books.The article was published on 1976-09-01. It has received 9 citations till now.
Citations
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Book
01 Jan 1979

43 citations

21 Nov 2012
TL;DR: Lindemann et al. as mentioned in this paper examined Dutch-North African relations in the seventeenth century and raised new questions about the origins and the development of early modern diplomacy and invited us to rethink the position of European states in global power relations.
Abstract: of a dissertation at the University of Miami. Dissertation supervised by Professor Mary Lindemann. No. of pages in text. (418) In the seventeenth-century western Mediterranean, the conflict between the Dutch Republic and North African principalities over the issues of corsairing and the capture of Christians created a type of diplomacy that significantly deviates from our traditional understanding of how early modern diplomacy evolved, namely as an exchange of resident ambassadors between European states. As a study in the New Diplomatic History, this dissertation emphasizes the significance of cultural practices and political interests between Europe and other parts of the world. Over the course of the seventeenth century, North African society greatly influenced the rhythms and patterns of the evolving diplomatic relations, practices, and policies in the western Mediterranean in four particular ways. First, Europe and the Maghreb employed a mixed group of negotiators to conduct their affairs and did not exchange resident ambassadors as sovereigns in Europe usually did. Dutch consuls, whose role as merchant-consuls transformed into that of staterepresentatives, became the pre-eminent diplomats conducting the Republic’s affairs in North Africa. Second, Dutch and North African negotiators sought to combine commercial and political interests rather than follow the grand political agendas that governments in Europe often developed and pursued. Third, because the Dutch and North Africans did not exchange plenipotentiary resident ambassadors, Dutch consuls stationed in the Maghreb were forced to adjust to North African customary practices, especially those of ransoming captives and lavish gift-giving. Finally, these adjustments to North African negotiating practices, especially the giving of gifts that eventually became a form of paying tribute, demonstrate how early modern diplomacy in the western Mediterranean did not evolve in a linear manner. Thus, by examining Dutch-North African relations in the seventeenth century, this study raises new questions about the origins and the development of early modern diplomacy and invites us to rethink the position of European states in global power relations.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the logic and effects of the war on piracy and terrorism in relation to emerging structures of national sovereignty and international cultural-politicaleconomic hegemony in North Africa.
Abstract: Since the sixteenth century, North Africa has functioned as a frontier zone for "the West," as a space of abject uncertainty through and against which "the West" is defined and on which "the West" has variously engaged in violent intervention, often by proxy. From the final suppression of Barbary piracy with the French colonization of Algeria in 1830 to the military engagement against Algerian Islamist militias during the current civil war that has claimed at least 125,000 lives, North Africa has been at the forefront of the consolidation of state national regimes of violence against forms of economic and political banditry. At various historical moments, including the present "war on terror," these struggles have crossed the Mediterranean, as well as the Atlantic, and have taken on global dimensions. With a focus on the case of political violence in North Africa, this article explores the logic and effects of the war on piracy and terrorism in relation to emerging structures of national sovereignty and international cultural-politicaleconomic hegemony.

18 citations


Cites background from "Algiers in the Age of the Corsairs"

  • ...…as a thorn in the side of European maritime commerce in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries (cf. Bixler 1959; Coindreau 1948; Fisher 1974; Spencer 1976; Wolf 1979).2 Condemned as pirates by the Atlantic powers (Anderson 2001, 90–91; Starkey 2001b, 109), Barbary corsairs raided European…...

    [...]

Dissertation
16 Apr 2009
TL;DR: In this paper, a socio-spatial study of the capital of Tunisia is presented, which includes a spatial study based on maps and satellite pictures, complemented with a social analysis based on an in situ investigation.
Abstract: The evolution of urbanization in the world motivated us to develop our research around this raging growth of cities and their resulting multitudes of urban forms. The object of this work is to analyze these spatial forms of growth and their impact on the city’s identity. The objective is to demonstrate in which measure they favour the proliferation of new identities in the suburb region of the city. Our research then focuses on a socio-spatial study of the capital of Tunisia. Tunis, this enlarging metropolis, occupies a strategically positioned location in the Mediterranean and plays an important role in European-African exchanges. The pertinence of the study of the evolution of the urban domain of Tunis results from the fact that this city experienced different types of growth. The variety of modes of development of the urban area makes Tunis a pertinent example which is worth being studied, especially since the space includes planned, spontaneous, historical suburbs, and many others which result from the informality linked from the heritage up to the construction of a plural urban identity. This work will thus include a spatial study of the evolution of the urban area of Tunis, based principally on maps and satellite pictures, complemented with a social analysis based on an in situ investigation, accomplished with the inhabitants of the suburbs with the intention of making a census of their degree of attachment to the space as well as their relationship with the downtown area. Our research allowed us to conclude that the inhabitants of the suburbs end up identifying themselves with new forms of growth and develop over the years a sense of belonging and attachment to their district. This contributes to the numerous proliferation of identity in the city.

13 citations

Book
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: Celik et al. as discussed by the authors described the history of Algiers as a "lingering obsession" in 19th-century French Colonial Discourse, and described the houses of the city as "houses of interest".
Abstract: AcknowledgmentsNote on TransliterationIntroduction / Zeynep Celik, Julia Clancy-Smith, and Frances Terpak PART 1: Peoples1. Eroticism, Erasures, and Absence: The Peopling of Algiers, 1830-1900 / Julia Clancy-Smith2. Medina and Modernity: The Emergence of Muslim Civil Society in Algiers between the Two World Wars / Omar Carlier Part II: Images3. The Promise and Power of New Technologies: Nineteenth-Century Algiers / Frances Terpak4. A Lingering Obsession: The Houses of Algiers in French Colonial Discourse / Zeynep Celik5. The Invisible Prison: Representing Algiers on Film / Eric Breitbart Part III. Places6. Masking and Unmasking the Historic Quarters of Algiers: The Reassessment of an Archive / Isabelle Grangaud7. Historic Intersections: The Center of Algiers / Zeynep CelikHistoriographies of Algiers: Critical Reflections / Patricia M. E. Lorcin Selected BibliographyIndexContributors

10 citations


Cites background from "Algiers in the Age of the Corsairs"

  • ...Wolf, respectively published in 1976 and 1979.(13) It is itself interesting that so little work has been done on the Ottoman era, with historians seeming to have...

    [...]

References
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1979

43 citations

21 Nov 2012
TL;DR: Lindemann et al. as mentioned in this paper examined Dutch-North African relations in the seventeenth century and raised new questions about the origins and the development of early modern diplomacy and invited us to rethink the position of European states in global power relations.
Abstract: of a dissertation at the University of Miami. Dissertation supervised by Professor Mary Lindemann. No. of pages in text. (418) In the seventeenth-century western Mediterranean, the conflict between the Dutch Republic and North African principalities over the issues of corsairing and the capture of Christians created a type of diplomacy that significantly deviates from our traditional understanding of how early modern diplomacy evolved, namely as an exchange of resident ambassadors between European states. As a study in the New Diplomatic History, this dissertation emphasizes the significance of cultural practices and political interests between Europe and other parts of the world. Over the course of the seventeenth century, North African society greatly influenced the rhythms and patterns of the evolving diplomatic relations, practices, and policies in the western Mediterranean in four particular ways. First, Europe and the Maghreb employed a mixed group of negotiators to conduct their affairs and did not exchange resident ambassadors as sovereigns in Europe usually did. Dutch consuls, whose role as merchant-consuls transformed into that of staterepresentatives, became the pre-eminent diplomats conducting the Republic’s affairs in North Africa. Second, Dutch and North African negotiators sought to combine commercial and political interests rather than follow the grand political agendas that governments in Europe often developed and pursued. Third, because the Dutch and North Africans did not exchange plenipotentiary resident ambassadors, Dutch consuls stationed in the Maghreb were forced to adjust to North African customary practices, especially those of ransoming captives and lavish gift-giving. Finally, these adjustments to North African negotiating practices, especially the giving of gifts that eventually became a form of paying tribute, demonstrate how early modern diplomacy in the western Mediterranean did not evolve in a linear manner. Thus, by examining Dutch-North African relations in the seventeenth century, this study raises new questions about the origins and the development of early modern diplomacy and invites us to rethink the position of European states in global power relations.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the logic and effects of the war on piracy and terrorism in relation to emerging structures of national sovereignty and international cultural-politicaleconomic hegemony in North Africa.
Abstract: Since the sixteenth century, North Africa has functioned as a frontier zone for "the West," as a space of abject uncertainty through and against which "the West" is defined and on which "the West" has variously engaged in violent intervention, often by proxy. From the final suppression of Barbary piracy with the French colonization of Algeria in 1830 to the military engagement against Algerian Islamist militias during the current civil war that has claimed at least 125,000 lives, North Africa has been at the forefront of the consolidation of state national regimes of violence against forms of economic and political banditry. At various historical moments, including the present "war on terror," these struggles have crossed the Mediterranean, as well as the Atlantic, and have taken on global dimensions. With a focus on the case of political violence in North Africa, this article explores the logic and effects of the war on piracy and terrorism in relation to emerging structures of national sovereignty and international cultural-politicaleconomic hegemony.

18 citations

Dissertation
16 Apr 2009
TL;DR: In this paper, a socio-spatial study of the capital of Tunisia is presented, which includes a spatial study based on maps and satellite pictures, complemented with a social analysis based on an in situ investigation.
Abstract: The evolution of urbanization in the world motivated us to develop our research around this raging growth of cities and their resulting multitudes of urban forms. The object of this work is to analyze these spatial forms of growth and their impact on the city’s identity. The objective is to demonstrate in which measure they favour the proliferation of new identities in the suburb region of the city. Our research then focuses on a socio-spatial study of the capital of Tunisia. Tunis, this enlarging metropolis, occupies a strategically positioned location in the Mediterranean and plays an important role in European-African exchanges. The pertinence of the study of the evolution of the urban domain of Tunis results from the fact that this city experienced different types of growth. The variety of modes of development of the urban area makes Tunis a pertinent example which is worth being studied, especially since the space includes planned, spontaneous, historical suburbs, and many others which result from the informality linked from the heritage up to the construction of a plural urban identity. This work will thus include a spatial study of the evolution of the urban area of Tunis, based principally on maps and satellite pictures, complemented with a social analysis based on an in situ investigation, accomplished with the inhabitants of the suburbs with the intention of making a census of their degree of attachment to the space as well as their relationship with the downtown area. Our research allowed us to conclude that the inhabitants of the suburbs end up identifying themselves with new forms of growth and develop over the years a sense of belonging and attachment to their district. This contributes to the numerous proliferation of identity in the city.

13 citations

Book
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: Celik et al. as discussed by the authors described the history of Algiers as a "lingering obsession" in 19th-century French Colonial Discourse, and described the houses of the city as "houses of interest".
Abstract: AcknowledgmentsNote on TransliterationIntroduction / Zeynep Celik, Julia Clancy-Smith, and Frances Terpak PART 1: Peoples1. Eroticism, Erasures, and Absence: The Peopling of Algiers, 1830-1900 / Julia Clancy-Smith2. Medina and Modernity: The Emergence of Muslim Civil Society in Algiers between the Two World Wars / Omar Carlier Part II: Images3. The Promise and Power of New Technologies: Nineteenth-Century Algiers / Frances Terpak4. A Lingering Obsession: The Houses of Algiers in French Colonial Discourse / Zeynep Celik5. The Invisible Prison: Representing Algiers on Film / Eric Breitbart Part III. Places6. Masking and Unmasking the Historic Quarters of Algiers: The Reassessment of an Archive / Isabelle Grangaud7. Historic Intersections: The Center of Algiers / Zeynep CelikHistoriographies of Algiers: Critical Reflections / Patricia M. E. Lorcin Selected BibliographyIndexContributors

10 citations