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Algorithms for clustering data

01 Jan 1988-

About: The article was published on 1988-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 8580 citation(s) till now. The article focuses on the topic(s): Cluster analysis & Correlation clustering.
Topics: Cluster analysis (79%), Correlation clustering (75%), CURE data clustering algorithm (73%), Fuzzy clustering (73%), Biclustering (72%)
Citations
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Book
Jiawei Han1, Micheline Kamber2, Jian Pei2Institutions (2)
08 Sep 2000
TL;DR: This book presents dozens of algorithms and implementation examples, all in pseudo-code and suitable for use in real-world, large-scale data mining projects, and provides a comprehensive, practical look at the concepts and techniques you need to get the most out of real business data.
Abstract: The increasing volume of data in modern business and science calls for more complex and sophisticated tools. Although advances in data mining technology have made extensive data collection much easier, it's still always evolving and there is a constant need for new techniques and tools that can help us transform this data into useful information and knowledge. Since the previous edition's publication, great advances have been made in the field of data mining. Not only does the third of edition of Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques continue the tradition of equipping you with an understanding and application of the theory and practice of discovering patterns hidden in large data sets, it also focuses on new, important topics in the field: data warehouses and data cube technology, mining stream, mining social networks, and mining spatial, multimedia and other complex data. Each chapter is a stand-alone guide to a critical topic, presenting proven algorithms and sound implementations ready to be used directly or with strategic modification against live data. This is the resource you need if you want to apply today's most powerful data mining techniques to meet real business challenges. * Presents dozens of algorithms and implementation examples, all in pseudo-code and suitable for use in real-world, large-scale data mining projects. * Addresses advanced topics such as mining object-relational databases, spatial databases, multimedia databases, time-series databases, text databases, the World Wide Web, and applications in several fields. *Provides a comprehensive, practical look at the concepts and techniques you need to get the most out of real business data

23,590 citations


Proceedings Article
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: DBSCAN, a new clustering algorithm relying on a density-based notion of clusters which is designed to discover clusters of arbitrary shape, is presented which requires only one input parameter and supports the user in determining an appropriate value for it.
Abstract: Clustering algorithms are attractive for the task of class identification in spatial databases. However, the application to large spatial databases rises the following requirements for clustering algorithms: minimal requirements of domain knowledge to determine the input parameters, discovery of clusters with arbitrary shape and good efficiency on large databases. The well-known clustering algorithms offer no solution to the combination of these requirements. In this paper, we present the new clustering algorithm DBSCAN relying on a density-based notion of clusters which is designed to discover clusters of arbitrary shape. DBSCAN requires only one input parameter and supports the user in determining an appropriate value for it. We performed an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of DBSCAN using synthetic data and real data of the SEQUOIA 2000 benchmark. The results of our experiments demonstrate that (1) DBSCAN is significantly more effective in discovering clusters of arbitrary shape than the well-known algorithm CLARANS, and that (2) DBSCAN outperforms CLARANS by a factor of more than 100 in terms of efficiency.

14,280 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Anil K. Jain1, M. N. Murty2, Patrick J. Flynn3Institutions (3)
TL;DR: An overview of pattern clustering methods from a statistical pattern recognition perspective is presented, with a goal of providing useful advice and references to fundamental concepts accessible to the broad community of clustering practitioners.
Abstract: Clustering is the unsupervised classification of patterns (observations, data items, or feature vectors) into groups (clusters). The clustering problem has been addressed in many contexts and by researchers in many disciplines; this reflects its broad appeal and usefulness as one of the steps in exploratory data analysis. However, clustering is a difficult problem combinatorially, and differences in assumptions and contexts in different communities has made the transfer of useful generic concepts and methodologies slow to occur. This paper presents an overview of pattern clustering methods from a statistical pattern recognition perspective, with a goal of providing useful advice and references to fundamental concepts accessible to the broad community of clustering practitioners. We present a taxonomy of clustering techniques, and identify cross-cutting themes and recent advances. We also describe some important applications of clustering algorithms such as image segmentation, object recognition, and information retrieval.

13,346 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Jianbo Shi1, Jitendra Malik2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: This work treats image segmentation as a graph partitioning problem and proposes a novel global criterion, the normalized cut, for segmenting the graph, which measures both the total dissimilarity between the different groups as well as the total similarity within the groups.
Abstract: We propose a novel approach for solving the perceptual grouping problem in vision. Rather than focusing on local features and their consistencies in the image data, our approach aims at extracting the global impression of an image. We treat image segmentation as a graph partitioning problem and propose a novel global criterion, the normalized cut, for segmenting the graph. The normalized cut criterion measures both the total dissimilarity between the different groups as well as the total similarity within the groups. We show that an efficient computational technique based on a generalized eigenvalue problem can be used to optimize this criterion. We applied this approach to segmenting static images, as well as motion sequences, and found the results to be very encouraging.

13,025 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Dorin Comaniciu1, Peter Meer1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: It is proved the convergence of a recursive mean shift procedure to the nearest stationary point of the underlying density function and, thus, its utility in detecting the modes of the density.
Abstract: A general non-parametric technique is proposed for the analysis of a complex multimodal feature space and to delineate arbitrarily shaped clusters in it. The basic computational module of the technique is an old pattern recognition procedure: the mean shift. For discrete data, we prove the convergence of a recursive mean shift procedure to the nearest stationary point of the underlying density function and, thus, its utility in detecting the modes of the density. The relation of the mean shift procedure to the Nadaraya-Watson estimator from kernel regression and the robust M-estimators; of location is also established. Algorithms for two low-level vision tasks discontinuity-preserving smoothing and image segmentation - are described as applications. In these algorithms, the only user-set parameter is the resolution of the analysis, and either gray-level or color images are accepted as input. Extensive experimental results illustrate their excellent performance.

11,014 citations


References
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Book
01 Feb 1975

6,062 citations


Book
01 Dec 1973

5,132 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The basic problem considered is that of interconnecting a given set of terminals with a shortest possible network of direct links Simple and practical procedures are given for solving this problem both graphically and computationally It develops that these procedures also provide solutions for a much broader class of problems, containing other examples of practical interest

4,115 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Glenn W. Milligan1, Martha C. Cooper1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: A Monte Carlo evaluation of 30 procedures for determining the number of clusters was conducted on artificial data sets which contained either 2, 3, 4, or 5 distinct nonoverlapping clusters to provide a variety of clustering solutions.
Abstract: A Monte Carlo evaluation of 30 procedures for determining the number of clusters was conducted on artificial data sets which contained either 2, 3, 4, or 5 distinct nonoverlapping clusters. To provide a variety of clustering solutions, the data sets were analyzed by four hierarchical clustering methods. External criterion measures indicated excellent recovery of the true cluster structure by the methods at the correct hierarchy level. Thus, the clustering present in the data was quite strong. The simulation results for the stopping rules revealed a wide range in their ability to determine the correct number of clusters in the data. Several procedures worked fairly well, whereas others performed rather poorly. Thus, the latter group of rules would appear to have little validity, particularly for data sets containing distinct clusters. Applied researchers are urged to select one or more of the better criteria. However, users are cautioned that the performance of some of the criteria may be data dependent.

3,357 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Robin Sibson1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: Sibson gives an O(n 2) algorithm for single-linkage clustering, and proves that this algorithm achieves the theoretically optimal lower time bound for obtaining a single- linkage dendrogram.
Abstract: Main point Sibson gives an O(n 2) algorithm for single-linkage clustering, and proves that this algorithm achieves the theoretically optimal lower time bound for obtaining a single-linkage dendrogram. This improves upon the naive O(n 3) implementation of single linkage clustering. A single linkage dendrogram is a tree, where each level of the tree corresponds to a different threshold dissimilarity measure h. The nodes of a dataset are grouped into \" equivalence classes \" c(h) at each level of the dendrogram, where two classes C i and C j are merged if there is a pair of \" OTU's \" (vertices) v i ∈ C i and v j ∈ C j such that the dissimilarity measure between v i and v j is less than h, or D(v i , v j) < h. For example, consider a set of 10 vertices v 1 ,. .. , v 10 for which the dissimilarity matrix D is given below, with D ij equal to the dissimilarity between v i and v j. Suppose we take four cutoff dissimilarity measures h 1 , h 2 , h 3 , h 4 and produce the dendrogram according to these thresholds. An example illustrating how the 10 vertices are grouped into equivalence classes at each level is shown in Figure 1. Since no dissimilarity is at or below 1, each vertex or \" OTU \" is its own equivalence class at the level corresponding to h 1 = 1. At the next level, however, we see that some classes have been merged together because several dissimilarity measures are below h 2 = 2. We can see that c(h 2) consists of 6 equivalence classes, c(h 3) has 3 equivalence classes, and c(h 4 = 4) aggregates all the vertices into one equivalence class. In single linkage clustering, the number of levels in the tree is determined by the nearest-neighbor criterion – at each level, at least one new merge is made between two clusters, and the merge is made for clusters C i and C j if the minimal distance between vertices v i ∈ C i and v j ∈ C j is the smallest such distance across all the clusters. In other words, the nearest neighbors between clusters C j and C i are found, and if these neighbors are closer than all the other nearest-neighbor pairs, then C i and C …

1,094 citations


Network Information
Related Papers (5)

Anil K. Jain, M. N. Murty +1 more

08 Sep 2000

Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber +1 more

Performance
Metrics
No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20229
2021205
2020236
2019260
2018256
2017276