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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/13561820.2020.1732311

Allied health professionals' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration in primary health care: an integrative review

04 Mar 2021-Journal of Interprofessional Care (Informa Healthcare)-Vol. 35, Iss: 2, pp 217-228
Abstract: This integrative review synthesizes research studies in order to explore the perceptions of allied health professionals regarding interprofessional collaboration in primary health care. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using three electronic databases and a manual search of the Journal of Interprofessional Care. The Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool was used to assess the quality of included papers. Study findings were extracted, critically examined and grouped into themes. Twelve studies conducted in six different countries met the inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis revealed five themes: (1) shared philosophy; (2) communication and clinical interaction; (3) physical environment; (4) power and hierarchy; and (5) financial considerations. This review has identified diverse key elements related to interprofessional collaboration in primary health care, as perceived by allied health professionals. Opportunity for frequent, informal communication appeared essential for interprofessional collaboration to occur. Allied health professionals working in close proximity to health practitioners from other professions had more regular interprofessional interactions than those who were geographically separated. Co-location of multiple primary health care services within the same physical space may offer increased opportunities for interprofessional collaboration. Future research should avoid reporting on allied health professionals in primary health care collectively, and isolate data to the individual professions. Direct observational methods are warranted to investigate whether allied health professionals' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration align with their actual clinical interactions in primary health care settings.

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Topics: Thematic analysis (52%)
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6 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1111/HSC.13211
Mirza Lalani1, Martin Marshall2Institutions (2)
Abstract: In an attempt to support care integration that promotes joined up service provision and patient-centred care across care boundaries, local health and social care organisations have embarked on several initiatives and approaches. A key component of service integration is the co-location of different professional groups. In this study, we consider the extent to which co-location is an enabler for service integration by examining multi-professional community care teams. The study presents findings from a qualitative evaluation of integrated care initiatives in a borough of East London, England, undertaken between 2017 and 2018. The evaluation employed a participatory approach, the Researcher-in-Residence model. Participant observation (n = 80 hr) and both semi-structured individual (n = 16) and group interviews (six groups, n = 17 participants) were carried out. Thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. The findings show that co-location can be an effective enabler for service integration providing a basis for joint working, fostering improved communication and information sharing if conditions such as shared information systems and professional cultures (shared beliefs and values) are met. Organisations must consider the potential barriers to service integration such as differing professional identity, limited understanding of roles and responsibilities and a lack of continuity in personnel. Co-location remains an important facet in the development of multi-professional teams and local service integration arrangements, but as yet, has not been widely acknowledged as a priority in care practice. Organisations that are committed to greying care boundaries and providing joined up patient care must ensure that sufficient focus is provided at the service delivery level and not assume that decades of silo working in health and social care and strong professional cultures will be resolved by co-location.

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Topics: Integrated care (67%), Service delivery framework (60%), Service (business) (55%) ... read more

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1590/S0103-73312020300405
14 Dec 2020-
Abstract: Resumo Este artigo objetiva analisar a influencia dos aspectos macro e micropoliticos na organizacao e processo de trabalho do NASF. Trata-se de uma scoping review, realizada durante o mes de junho de 2020, nas bases de dados Lilacs e Medline. Identificou-se que questoes referentes a infraestrutura, gestao do trabalho do NASF, formacao para o SUS, relacao entre as equipes e caracteristicas dos profissionais do NASF influenciam a organizacao e o processo de trabalho do NASF, evidenciando-se a ocorrencia de um maior numero de desafios, em detrimento das potencialidades para esse processo. Destaca-se que atravessamentos marcados pela conjuntura atual podem refletir incisivamente no trabalho dessas equipes. Aponta-se a necessidade da implantacao de estrategias no sentido de dirimir os obstaculos desvelados por este estudo, tais como a criacao de espacos de educacao permanente no cotidiano das equipes, o estabelecimento de ferramentas de cogestao, e o incentivo a iniciativas que fomentem a integracao ensino-servico-comunidade.

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1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.46743/1540-580X/2020.1919
Abstract: Background: Interprofessional collaboration is a complex process defined by the relationships and interactions between health practitioners from diverse professional backgrounds. Although the benefits of a collaborative health workforce are widely acknowledged, it is currently poorly understood to what extent private physiotherapy practitioners engage in interprofessional collaboration as a part of their clinical practice, and whether they consider to be adequately trained in this area. Information regarding the frequency, modes of communication, and perceived level of satisfaction associated with private physiotherapy practitioners’ interprofessional interactions is also limited. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a survey instrument that can be used to explore the characteristics of Australian private physiotherapy practitioners’ interprofessional interactions. Methods: A multiphase process was used to develop the survey instrument. The research team conducted a literature search which resulted in the generation of 34 individual survey items. After the initial pool of survey items was developed, three experienced physiotherapists were invited to review the items. The draft survey instrument was then subject to online testing with private physiotherapy practitioners to evaluate the utility of the instrument. Results: All three physiotherapists invited to review the initial pool of survey items provided written feedback to the research team. Following revision, five private physiotherapy practitioners participated in pilot testing the survey instrument. Pilot testing revealed that approximately 10 minutes was required to complete the online survey. Conclusions: The final survey instrument has 29 questions in six sections with categorical, Likert and free text response options and can be used to explore the characteristics of Australian private physiotherapy practitioners’ interprofessional interactions. Information obtained from future research projects utilising this survey may guide the development of effective interventions aimed at enhancing the nature and quality of clinical interactions between private physiotherapy practitioners and other health practitioners working in Australia.

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Topics: Private practice (58%)

1 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1071/PY20148
Abstract: Effective interprofessional collaboration (IPC) contributes to superior patient outcomes, facilitates cost-efficient health care, and increases patient and practitioner satisfaction. However, there is concern that IPC may be difficult to implement in clinical settings that do not conform to formal team-based processes, such as mono-professional physiotherapy private practice facilities. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of private physiotherapy practitioners' interprofessional interactions, including their experiences and perceptions regarding IPC. A custom developed cross-sectional online survey instrument was used to collect data from physiotherapists employed in private practice facilities in Queensland, Australia. In all, 49 (20% response rate) physiotherapists completed the survey. Only a small proportion (14%) indicated that their interprofessional interactions were a daily occurrence, and less than one-third of all respondents (31%) participated in formal, multi-professional face-to-face planned meetings. Most participants (76%) reported a moderate-to-high level of satisfaction regarding their interprofessional interactions. Despite low self-reported levels of interprofessional activity and other data indicating that IPC is necessary for holistic patient care, this study shows that physiotherapists were predominately satisfied when interacting with health practitioners from various professional backgrounds. Further research is required to inform the implementation of robust strategies that will support sustainable models of IPC in physiotherapy private practice.

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Topics: Private practice (60%), Health care (57%), Community health (53%) ... read more

1 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/14461242.2021.1886865
Olivia King1, Nicole Shaw1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Informal interprofessional interactions have gained interest in recent interprofessional care, education, health services and social sciences research literature. Some of the established benefits a...

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Topics: Health care (57%)

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57 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1191/1478088706QP063OA
Virginia Braun1, Victoria Clarke2Institutions (2)
Abstract: Thematic analysis is a poorly demarcated, rarely acknowledged, yet widely used qualitative analytic method within psychology. In this paper, we argue that it offers an accessible and theoretically flexible approach to analysing qualitative data. We outline what thematic analysis is, locating it in relation to other qualitative analytic methods that search for themes or patterns, and in relation to different epistemological and ontological positions. We then provide clear guidelines to those wanting to start thematic analysis, or conduct it in a more deliberate and rigorous way, and consider potential pitfalls in conducting thematic analysis. Finally, we outline the disadvantages and advantages of thematic analysis. We conclude by advocating thematic analysis as a useful and flexible method for qualitative research in and beyond psychology.

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77,018 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1111/J.1365-2648.2005.03621.X
Robin Whittemore1, Kathleen A. Knafl2Institutions (2)
Abstract: Aim. The aim of this paper is to distinguish the integrative review method from other review methods and to propose methodological strategies specific to the integrative review method to enhance the rigour of the process. Background. Recent evidence-based practice initiatives have increased the need for and the production of all types of reviews of the literature (integrative reviews, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and qualitative reviews). The integrative review method is the only approach that allows for the combination of diverse methodologies (for example, experimental and non-experimental research), and has the potential to play a greater role in evidence-based practice for nursing. With respect to the integrative review method, strategies to enhance data collection and extraction have been developed; however, methods of analysis, synthesis, and conclusion drawing remain poorly formulated. Discussion. A modified framework for research reviews is presented to address issues specific to the integrative review method. Issues related to specifying the review purpose, searching the literature, evaluating data from primary sources, analysing data, and presenting the results are discussed. Data analysis methods of qualitative research are proposed as strategies that enhance the rigour of combining diverse methodologies as well as empirical and theoretical sources in an integrative review. Conclusion. An updated integrative review method has the potential to allow for diverse primary research methods to become a greater part of evidence-based practice initiatives.

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Topics: Systematic review (56%), Rigour (53%)

4,937 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1111/J.1471-1842.2009.00848.X
Maria J. Grant1, Andrew Booth2Institutions (2)
Abstract: Background and objectives : The expansion of evidence-based practice across sectors has lead to an increasing variety of review types. However, the diversity of terminology used means that the full potential of these review types may be lost amongst a confusion of indistinct and misapplied terms. The objective of this study is to provide descriptive insight into the most common types of reviews, with illustrative examples from health and health information domains. Methods : Following scoping searches, an examination was made of the vocabulary associated with the literature of review and synthesis (literary warrant). A simple analytical framework—Search, AppraisaL, Synthesis and Analysis (SALSA)—was used to examine the main review types. Results : Fourteen review types and associated methodologies were analysed against the SALSA framework, illustrating the inputs and processes of each review type. A description of the key characteristics is given, together with perceived strengths and weaknesses. A limited number of review types are currently utilized within the health information domain. Conclusions : Few review types possess prescribed and explicit methodologies and many fall short of being mutually exclusive. Notwithstanding such limitations, this typology provides a valuable reference point for those commissioning, conducting, supporting or interpreting reviews, both within health information and the wider health care domain.

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3,774 Citations


Open access
01 Jan 2010-
Abstract: At a time when the world is facing a shortage of health workers, policymakers are looking for innovative strategies that can help them develop policy and programmes to bolster the global health workforce. The Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice highlights the current status of interprofessional collaboration around the world, identifies the mechanisms that shape successful collaborative teamwork and outlines a series of action items that policy-makers can apply within their local health system. The goal of the Framework is to provide strategies and ideas that will help health policy-makers implement the elements of interprofessional education and collaborative practice that will be most beneficial in their own jurisdiction.

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Topics: Interprofessional education (72%), Teamwork (52%)

1,550 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.2307/2393703
Ruth Wageman1Institutions (1)
Topics: Job performance (65%), Job satisfaction (63%), Task analysis (51%)

1,296 Citations