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Journal ArticleDOI

An analytical approach on life cycle cost analysis of a green building

01 Jan 2020-Materials Today: Proceedings (Elsevier BV)-Vol. 33, pp 387-390
TL;DR: In this paper, a life cycle budget for the complete existence of a green construction for 80 years by using life cycle costing technique was established and it was shown that future costs are 5.7% greater than the initial construction cost.
About: This article is published in Materials Today: Proceedings.The article was published on 2020-01-01. It has received 9 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Life-cycle cost analysis & Cost effectiveness.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results indicated that light steel frame houses present a better behavior than other conventional alternatives, and the integration of building information modelling with LCA and LCCA in the design phase can lead to the development of more sustainable houses.
Abstract: Despite insufficient housing facilities, particularly in developing countries, construction systems are generally selected intuitively or based on conventional solutions sanctioned by practice. The present study aims to evaluate different options for the design of low-income housing in Brazil by integrating the life cycle assessment (LCA) into the decision-making process. To achieve this objective, three single-family projects with different construction systems were selected and analyzed. The most sustainable design was selected through the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The considered parameters, which were obtained through a survey with professionals and customers, included cost, environmental impact, thermal comfort, construction time, and cultural acceptance. LCA and life cycle cost assessment (LCCA) were performed with the frontier’s system considering the cradle-to-gate cycle, which included the extraction of raw materials, manufacture of building materials, and housing construction. The projects were modelled using Autodesk Revit software with the Tally application for LCA evaluation. The results indicated that light steel frame houses present a better behavior than other conventional alternatives, and the integration of building information modelling with LCA and LCCA in the design phase can lead to the development of more sustainable houses.

12 citations


Cites methods from "An analytical approach on life cycl..."

  • ...An appropriate method for performing LCCA is that of net present value [29], according to which the LCC is the sum of all costs incurred during the study period, calculated at present value....

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Journal ArticleDOI

11 citations


Cites background from "An analytical approach on life cycl..."

  • ...It has revealed that the least energy consumption is proportional to minimum LCC.(141) The annualized LCC for coastal community load is computed as $242 922....

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  • ...It has revealed that the least energy consumption is proportional to minimum LCC.141 The annualized LCC for coastal community load is computed as $242 922.80/year to reduce the gap among energy demand and generation.51 The techno-economic optimization of standalone HRES has been analysed in which LCC estimated as $1.34 × 106.19...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work compares the application of different sensitivity analysis methodologies on eleven nearly zero-energy buildings with different uses and in several European contexts, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses and introduces and assesses an approach for applying sensitivity analysis in life cycle cost evaluations.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors analyzed livelihood security funding and opportunities for ecosystem restoration, drawing on India's Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA), the world's largest livelihood security program.
Abstract: Earth faces an unprecedented ecological crisis: the destruction of its ecosystems. Despite increasing interest in restoration, including through the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (Decade), lack of financing and resources mean efforts to reverse degradation have advanced slowly. Restoration efforts require new approaches to ensure the needs of different stakeholders are met. However, analyses of policies and opportunities that help to finance restoration while improving socioecological outcomes, are lacking. This paper analyzes livelihood security funding and opportunities for ecosystem restoration, drawing on India's Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA), the world's largest livelihood security program. The paper analyzes MGNREGA's performance between financial years 2013–2021, focusing on the financing of ecosystem restoration-related works, community mobilization and policy implementation in the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic. Then, the paper reflects on the benefits and shortcomings of MGNREGA and considers wider lessons for the Decade. MGNREGA generated significant funding flows and numbers of projects nationally, which can contribute to ecosystem restoration. Policy design enabled the continuation and increase of works even during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings demonstrate the potential of linking ecosystem restoration with development policies to unlock funds, on a national scale. To maximize contributions to ecosystem restoration nevertheless requires capacity building, inclusion of environmental indicators and integration of best ecosystem restoration practices.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2021
TL;DR: In this paper, a solid waste treatment model that is suitable to be applied in Indonesia was proposed by benchmarking in other countries, doing mathematical calculations using life cycle cost analysis, and validating experts.
Abstract: Solid waste management is needed by each region as a response to population growth. Nevertheless, there are still many areas that have not been able to provide ideal facilities for good solid waste management. One solution that can be done is to create a solid waste treatment model that is suitable to be applied in Indonesia. By benchmarking in other countries, doing mathematical calculations using life cycle cost analysis, and validating experts. The step resulted in a suitable model applied in Indonesia, namely Waste to Energy with a financing scheme of 60% for the government and 40% for the private sector, an internal rate of return (IRR) of 33.11% and an assumed repayment period of 5 years 122 days.

3 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors briefly explain some of the theoretical issues associated with life-cycle energy analysis and then uses an Australian-based case study to demonstrate the importance of both operational and embodied energy attributable to buildings over their lifetime.
Abstract: Energy use is a widely used measure of the environmental impact of buildings. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of both the operational and embodied energy attributable to buildings over their lifetime. The method of assessing lifetime building energy is known as life-cycle energy analysis. With Kyoto target obligations necessitating the quantification of greenhouse gas emissions at the national level, it seems increasingly probable that analyses of this kind will increase in use. If conducted in primary energy terms, such analyses directly reflect greenhouse gas emissions, except for a few processes which involve significant non-energy related emissions such as cement manufacture. A Life-Cycle Assessment would include these issues, as well as other environmental parameters, though probably with a corresponding decrease in system boundary completeness. This paper briefly explains some of the theoretical issues associated with life-cycle energy analysis and then uses an Australian based case s...

385 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present work describes the waste management model that has inspired this decree: the Alcores model implemented with good results in Los Alcores Community (Seville, Spain), and a detailed model is provided to estimate the volume of waste that is expected to be generated on the building site.

311 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper aims to review reports on LCC applications to provide an overview of LCC uses and implementation feasibility and highlights the difficulty of conducting a reliable LCC analysis, and points out typical problems that should be carefully considered before drawing conclusions from the L CC analysis.
Abstract: Purpose – Despite existing life cycle costing (LCC) method descriptions and practicable suggestions for conducting LCC analyses, no systematic analyses on actual implementations of LCC methods exist. This paper aims to review reports on LCC applications to provide an overview of LCC uses and implementation feasibility.Design/methodology/approach – A review of LCC cases reported in academic and practitioner literature. Case reports were compared against one another and against the defining articles in the field.Findings – Most of the reported LCC applications were far from ideal. Compared to the methods suggested in the literature many of the case study applications: covered fewer parts of the whole life cycle, estimated the costs on a lower level of detail, used cost estimation methods based on expert opinion rather than statistical methods, and were content with deterministic estimates of life cycle costs instead of using sensitivity analyses.Research limitations/implications – This review is limited to ...

194 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a study that demonstrates how the life cycle cost analysis was conducted for a green building and shows how the Life Cycle Cost Variability (LCV) variables were identified and used to develop a life cycle budget for the whole life cycle of the green building which extends for 60 years.
Abstract: Life cycle costing is gaining considerable attention particularly within the context of sustainable construction. However, the application of life cycle costing in the construction sectors is still limited and facing practical problems. Imperfect understanding of life cycle costing methodology and application is considered one of the key barriers to a widespread application of life cycle costing in the construction industry. This paper presents a study that demonstrates how the life cycle cost analysis was conducted for a green building and shows how the life cycle cost variables were identified and used to develop a life cycle budget for the whole life cycle of a green building which extends for 60 years. It is found in this research that the future costs of the investigated green building are around 3.6 times as high as its initial design and construction costs. Not surprisingly, the energy cost constitutes a weight of 48% of the total life cycle budget for the building, and this ratio goes above 60% when weighted against building operating costs only. It is also found that reduced energy consumption in the green building is the most influential factor to reduce its total life cycle cost.

90 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the analysis on the life cycle cost of timber materials in their various applications for residential buildings in Australia and thereby provide guidance on how to best meet the requirement set out in the timber credit in the Green Start rating scheme.

50 citations

Trending Questions (1)
DO green office building awarded by GBI Malaysia consider Life Cycle Cost Analysis?

Yes, the research demonstrates the establishment of a life cycle budget for the complete existence of a green construction, indicating that green buildings consider life cycle cost analysis.