scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Dissertation

An exploration of embodied narrative in ceramic vessels

01 Jan 2016-
TL;DR: In this paper, it is argued that the development of ideas explicated through selected works from my artistic practice, and supported by the contextualisation offered by my two books, constitutes a new contribution to the field.
Abstract: In this exegesis it is argued that the development of ideas explicated through selected works from my artistic practice, and supported by the contextualisation offered by my two books, constitutes a new contribution to the field. This commentary charts the development of a language of making, developed through the process and writing about raku and high-fired ceramics; it then evolved through installation practice and appropriation to frame a new personal expressive direction to the work. The main methodological approach is an analysis through the practice itself as a tool of research. This fits the paradigm of Practice as Research (PaR) as an analytical tool that can provide revelatory insights into artistic output; the revelations derived from this analysis are read through the lens of phenomenology. This philosophical perspective is developed, through the critical tool of PaR, into a metaphoric concern, where the clay body of a ceramic vessel can also be read as a human body. The argument is developed through a critique of the narratives embodied in the work that have become evident to me through the interwoven activities of making and reflective writing. To this end, a trajectory is charted through significant submissions; this narrative commences by examining individual vessels, via an analysis of related pieces in exhibitions to an emergent installation-practice that reveals new insights and a new reading of the work as by a second-generation Holocaust survivor.
Citations
More filters
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The powers of horror an essay on abjection is available in our book collection an online access to it is set as public so you can get it instantly as mentioned in this paper, our book servers save in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one.
Abstract: Thank you for reading powers of horror an essay on abjection. As you may know, people have look numerous times for their favorite books like this powers of horror an essay on abjection, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some infectious bugs inside their laptop. powers of horror an essay on abjection is available in our book collection an online access to it is set as public so you can get it instantly. Our book servers saves in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Merely said, the powers of horror an essay on abjection is universally compatible with any devices to read.

260 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the central role of the Internet in the emergence of this "modest fashion industry" and how Internet platforms provide for a unique vantage point to not only determine what counts as modesty but to equally enable discussions in this respect.
Abstract: 270 dress embodying a sense of “ordinariness’” which also “transcends identity” (132). Rather than being pre-given, determining the “modest” or “halal” nature of a particular dress is therefore subjected to continuous discussion and interpretation (see for instance Moors (29), Cameron (145)). This is also clearly illustrated through the contribution of Barbara Goldman Carrel who offers a nice ethnography of how Boston-based Hasidic communities are involved in a continuous adjustment or “Hasidification” of manufactured and designer clothes. This ranges from learning techniques to re-adjust the dress to fit one’s standards (re-adjusting the neckline, shoulder size) to inscribing one’s preference for designer clothes into a discourse of royalty that confirm the Hasidim in their position of spiritual superiority (109). Understanding how the negotiation of these boundaries takes place would, however, be impossible without understanding the central role of the Internet in this respect. A second aim of this volume is therefore to underscore the central role of the Internet in the emergence of this “modest fashion industry” and how Internet platforms provide for a unique vantage point to not only determine what counts as modesty but to equally enable discussions in this respect. In Emma Tarlo’s contribution we are witness to how modest fashion not only enables interconfessional encounters between Jewish, Christian, and Muslim women but also how the Internet (and the anonymity it offers) plays an important role in bridging these boundaries (78–9). The importance of the Internet also lies at the heart of Reina Lewis’s contribution. Yet in this account the Internet not only acts as a passive platform but is understood through its own logic of advertising, of hyperlinking, and of restructuring the religious communities (e.g. 54). She looks, for instance, at the central role fashion bloggers play and how they not only act as main alternative to the offline fashion magazine for modest fashion style, but also how these same fashion bloggers almost emerge as semi-formal new (female) authorities in the religious field (52); see also Moors’ contribution (28–9). Finally, Liz Hogard pays attention to the media framing of “modest fashion” which highlights the way in which the female body remains a central site of surveillance—as epitomized through the Nigella Lawson burkini controversy in 2011 (187). Through the adoption of such a comparative approach, the volume nicely captures the complexity that surrounds modest fashion and for the most part manages to avoid essentializing accounts that take religion and gender as incompatible. However, not all contributions succeed this endeavour. In a remarkable intervention, Elisabeth Wilson addresses the by-now classical question of veiling and patriarchy, yet does so in a way that it reproduces many of the clichés that were criticized and deconstructed by the various contributions in the same volume. Yet aside from these unfortunate exceptions, Modest Fashion remains an interesting contribution to the literature on fashion and religion through the attention it accords to the role of the Internet, the broad interfaith approach it adopts, and the analytical reflection it offers on how through the category of modesty traditional gender roles, dominant beauty standards and interfaith relationships are continuously redefined.

102 citations

Book
01 Jan 1979

2 citations

References
More filters
Book
Hannah Arendt1
01 Jan 1958
TL;DR: The Human Condition as mentioned in this paper is a classic in political and social theory, The Human Condition is a work that has proved both timeless and perpetually timely, it contains Margaret Canovan's 1998 introduction and a new foreword by Danielle Allen.
Abstract: The past year has seen a resurgence of interest in the political thinker Hannah Arendt, "the theorist of beginnings," whose work probes the logics underlying unexpected transformations-from totalitarianism to revolution. A work of striking originality, The Human Condition is in many respects more relevant now than when it first appeared in 1958. In her study of the state of modern humanity, Hannah Arendt considers humankind from the perspective of the actions of which it is capable. The problems Arendt identified then-diminishing human agency and political freedom, the paradox that as human powers increase through technological and humanistic inquiry, we are less equipped to control the consequences of our actions-continue to confront us today. This new edition, published to coincide with the sixtieth anniversary of its original publication, contains Margaret Canovan's 1998 introduction and a new foreword by Danielle Allen. A classic in political and social theory, The Human Condition is a work that has proved both timeless and perpetually timely.

7,650 citations


"An exploration of embodied narrativ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…burials; this utilisation of ceramics as a main ingredient in the work was confirmed by Hannah Arendt’s observation that “We are surrounded by things more permanent than the activity by which they were produced, and potentially more permanent than the lives of their authors” (Arendt, 1998, p172)....

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1936
TL;DR: One of the most important works of cultural theory ever written, Walter Benjamin's groundbreaking essay explores how the age of mass media means audiences can listen to or see a work of art repeatedly and what the troubling social and political implications of this are as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: One of the most important works of cultural theory ever written, Walter Benjamin's groundbreaking essay explores how the age of mass media means audiences can listen to or see a work of art repeatedly - and what the troubling social and political implications of this are. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.

5,238 citations

Book
01 Jan 1954
TL;DR: The relationship between us and technology will be free if it opens their human existence to the essence of technology, and in so doing the authors should like to prepare a free relationship to it.
Abstract: In what follows we shall be questioning concerning technology. Questioning builds a way. We would be advised, therefore, above all to pay heed to the way, and not to fix our attention on isolated sentences and topics. The way is a way of thinking. All ways of thinking, more or less perceptibly, lead through language in a manner that is extraordinary. We shall be questioning concerning technology, and in so doing we should like to prepare a free relationship to it. The relationship will be free if it opens our human existence to the essence of technology. When we can respond to this essence, we shall be able to experience the technological within its own bounds. Technology is not equivalent to the essence of technology. When we are seeking the essence of ‘‘tree,’’ we have to become aware that that which pervades every tree, as tree, is not itself a tree that can be encountered among all the other trees. Likewise, the essence of technology is by no means anything technological. Thus we shall never experience our relationship to the essence of technology so long as we merely conceive and push forward the technological, put up with it, or evade it. Everywhere we remain unfree and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or deny it. But we are delivered over to it in the worst possible way when we regard it as something neutral; for this conception of it, to which today we particularly like to do homage, makes us utterly blind to the essence of technology. According to ancient doctrine, the essence of a thing is considered to be what the thing is. We ask the question concerning technology when we ask what it is. Everyone knows the two statements that answer our question. One says: Technology is a means to an end. The other says: Technology is a human activity. The two definitions of technology belong together. For to posit ends and procure and utilize the means to them is a human activity. The manufacture and utilization of equipment, tools, and machines, the manufactured and used things themselves, and the needs and ends that they serve, all belong to what technology is. The whole complex of these contrivances is technology. Technology itself is a contrivance, or, in Latin, an instrumentum. The current conception of technology, according to which it is a means and a human activity, can therefore be called the instrumental and anthropological definition of technology.

2,179 citations

Book
01 Jan 1964
TL;DR: The authors examined the myths of the South American Indians and demonstrates how these can be reduced to a comprehensible psychological pattern. But there is no fundamental break between the primitive mind and more evolved attitudes, and the author analyzes 250 myths to demonstrate their interrelation and basic structure.
Abstract: Examines the myths of the South American Indians and demonstrates how these can be reduced to a comprehensible psychological pattern. There is, he argues, no fundamental break between the primitive mind and more evolved attitudes. To prove this argument, the author analyzes 250 myths to demonstrate their interrelation and basic structure. By constant cross-referencing to European customs, he succeeds in setting myths is a general cultural context.

781 citations