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Journal ArticleDOI

‘An instruction in good citizenship’: scouting and the historical geographies of citizenship education

01 Jan 2013-Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers (Blackwell Publishing Ltd)-Vol. 38, Iss: 1, pp 120-134
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine informal citizenship training for youth and the historical geographies of education over time through analysing the Scout Movement in Britain and its activities in the first half of the twentieth century.
Abstract: This paper examines informal citizenship training for youth and the historical geographies of education over time through analysing the Scout Movement in Britain and its activities in the first half of the twentieth century. In doing so, it highlights the complexity of youth citizenship and the significance of non-school spaces in civil society to our understandings of young people's positioning as citizen-subjects. Drawing on archival research, I demonstrate how a specific youth citizenship project was constructed and maintained through the Scout Movement. I argue that various processes, strategies and regulations were involved in envisioning 'citizen-scout' and developing both duty-bound, self-regulated individuals as well as a wider collective body of British youth. This analysis speaks to broader debates on citizenship, nationhood and youth, as well as highlighting how the historical geographies of citizenship education are an important area of study for geographers.

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Citations
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107 citations


Cites background from "‘An instruction in good citizenship..."

  • ...These spaces of learning should, as Mills (2012) demonstrates, include the informal alongside longer standing interest in formal learning environments, elucidating their role in the making of socio-spatial identities and networks....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors found that middle-class children have much higher participation rates in enrichment activities than their working-class counterparts, and that parents value enrichment activities in very similar ways across the class spectrum.
Abstract: Geographical research on children, youth, and families has done much to highlight the ways in which children's lives have changed over the last twenty-five years. A key strand of research concerns children's play and traces, in the Global North, a decline in children's independent access to, and mobility through, public space. This article shifts the terrain of that debate from an analysis of what has been lost to an exploration of what has replaced it. Specifically, it focuses on children's participation in enrichment activities, including both individual and collective extracurricular sporting, cultural, and leisure opportunities in England. The research reveals that middle-class children have much higher participation rates in enrichment activities than their working-class counterparts. Parents value enrichment activities in very similar ways across the class spectrum—seeing them as fun, healthy, and social opportunities. The ability to pay for enrichment, however, means that it is incorporated into, a...

105 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review essay as discussed by the authors covers a decade of scholarship developed by geographers who engage with children, young people and politics, and examines the ways in which the field has been expanded through conceptualisation and deconstruction of taken-for-granted approaches.
Abstract: This review essay covers a decade of scholarship developed by geographers who engage with children, young people and politics. It first outlines the boundaries within which the review was conducted. It then sets the scene of the starting points in 2003 of the when and where of the scholarship of children's and young people's political geographies. Section 3 provides focus on a wide range of contributions made in order to stake a claim within the wider discipline of Geography and explores the connections made with, and conceptions drawn from, feminist geography. Section 4 examines the ways in which the field has been expanded through conceptualisation and deconstruction of taken-for-granted approaches. Here, the intellectual value of reconsiderations or innovations of the concepts of scale, child and childhood, politics, agency, articulation, geopolitics and critical geopolitics are excavated and explicated. The paper ends with concluding thoughts and pointers towards the next decade of youthful political ...

77 citations


Cites background from "‘An instruction in good citizenship..."

  • ...Vibrant and important work on citizenship has surfaced in a rapid and intense way during the past decade (see Gaskell, 2008; Mills, 2011, 2013; Mitchell, 2003, 2006; Weller, 2007; Weller and Bruegel, 2009; Skelton, 2005)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that rather than being about the encouragement of happy, content or well-adjusted individuals, it is, more crucially, about a new form of citizenship.
Abstract: Schools are one of many sites to incorporate emotional literacy into their institutional agenda in recent years. Alongside broader changes in social, economic and political practice, schools have welcomed emotional education as a necessary element in the training of young people. In 2007, the government introduced Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) to secondary schools across England and Wales. The aim of the programme is to integrate emotional literacy into the secondary school curriculum, following the successful implementation of SEAL at primary level. In this paper, I argue that rather than being about the encouragement of happy, content or well-adjusted individuals, it is, more crucially, about a new form of citizenship. Forms of self-government predicated on emotional management have been made possible since the widespread popularisation of neuroscientific understandings of emotions. By tracing the transposition of these ideas from popular brain science to education policy and finally to the curricula delivered via SEAL, I suggest that educating emotions has become central to the way citizenship is currently being defined for young people. By bringing together recent insights from geographies of education, emotion and citizenship, I suggest that the relationship between governmentality, education and youth requires closer critical attention.

67 citations


Cites background from "‘An instruction in good citizenship..."

  • ...While the task of constructing citizen identities extends beyond education (e.g. Mills 2013, on citizenship and the Scout Movement), the school remains an important site in the establishment and maintenance of citizenly identities (Collins and Coleman 2008)....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI

2,204 citations


"‘An instruction in good citizenship..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Other historical geographical research (Matless 1995, 1998; Merriman 2005) has highlighted the various spaces and mechanisms through which young people were introduced to ideas of (rural) citizenship such as the Youth Hostels Association and the Country Code....

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  • ...…sense to list absentees, recording on the 9th February – “all patrol there except Stan”.3 It could be argued, therefore, that material objects such as this enabled the messages of scouting to gain wider circulation and instilled practices of self-governance in (young) citizens (Merriman 2005)....

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  • ...…laws stressing obedience, loyalty and duty functioned as a code of conduct and were a popular way of simplifying (adult) messages and governing behaviours in a communicable form, similar to the Country Code (Merriman 2005) and the Youth Hostels Association membership laws (Matless 1998, 72-3)....

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  • ...…the ideology of scouting – with BadenPowell stressing “self-control not only enables you to master bad habits, but also gives you command of your very thoughts” (1922a, 86) – as an early form of self-governance that predates neoliberal forms of governing at a distance (Cobb 2007; Merriman 2005)....

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  • ...(Baden-Powell 2004 [1908], 44) These laws stressing obedience, loyalty and duty functioned as a code of conduct and were a popular way of simplifying (adult) messages and governing behaviours in a communicable form, similar to the Country Code (Merriman 2005) and the Youth Hostels Association membership laws (Matless 1998, 72-3)....

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Book
01 Jan 1972
TL;DR: Cohen's Folk Devils and Moral Panics as mentioned in this paperolk devils and moral panics is an outstanding investigation of the way the media and often those in a position of political power define a condition, or group, as a threat to societal values and interests.
Abstract: 'Richly documented and convincingly presented' -- New Society Mods and Rockers, skinheads, video nasties, designer drugs, bogus asylum seeks and hoodies. Every era has its own moral panics. It was Stanley Cohen’s classic account, first published in the early 1970s and regularly revised, that brought the term ‘moral panic’ into widespread discussion. It is an outstanding investigation of the way in which the media and often those in a position of political power define a condition, or group, as a threat to societal values and interests. Fanned by screaming media headlines, Cohen brilliantly demonstrates how this leads to such groups being marginalised and vilified in the popular imagination, inhibiting rational debate about solutions to the social problems such groups represent. Furthermore, he argues that moral panics go even further by identifying the very fault lines of power in society. Full of sharp insight and analysis, Folk Devils and Moral Panics is essential reading for anyone wanting to understand this powerful and enduring phenomenon. Professor Stanley Cohen is Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics. He received the Sellin-Glueck Award of the American Society of Criminology (1985) and is on the Board of the International Council on Human Rights. He is a member of the British Academy.

1,864 citations

Book
01 Jun 1976
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors look in detail at a wide range of youth subcultures from teds and skinheads to black rastafarians, and present a collection of black skinheads.
Abstract: This collection looks in detail at the wide range of youth subcultures from teds and skinheads to black rastafarians.

1,486 citations


"‘An instruction in good citizenship..." refers background in this paper

  • ...(Dimmock 1954, inside sleeve) This mission-like attempt to reform a juvenile boy through scouting is emblematic of later fears surrounding troublesome youth and draws on many of the specific moral panics over youth sub-cultures in post-war Britain (Cohen 1973; Hall and Jefferson 1976)....

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  • ...This mission-like attempt to reform a juvenile boy through scouting is emblematic of later fears surrounding troublesome youth and draws on many of the specific moral panics over youth sub-cultures in post-war Britain (Cohen 1973; Hall and Jefferson 1976)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The logic-of-enquiry of participant observation has been used to do justice to the contradictions of our society in an adequate confrontation of the theoretical and political problems which they pose.
Abstract: ion, but will bear fruit to the extent that ways are found to do justice to the contradictions of our society in an adequate confrontation of the theoretical and political problems which they pose. The logic-of-enquiry of participant observation 233

718 citations