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Proceedings Article

An Instructional Design Model for Designing and Producing Online Virtual Labs for Educational Technology Students

TL;DR: A new suggestion model for instructional design is reached which guides the students in developing next learning environment with technology how to design and produce such online virtual labs as a new tool in improving learning in future schools and universities.
Abstract: The purpose of this work is to present a general instructional design model for helping educational technology students in designing and producing online virtual labs in any types of domain and course. We have made analyses of previous instructional design models and related studies in regard to the virtual labs to specify diverse features for the proposed model. It was found that the online virtual labs have no conventional instructional design model especially for designing and producing stages and also no static shape and components regarding. Based on these results, we have reached to a new suggestion model for instructional design which guides the students in developing next learning environment with technology how to design and produce such online virtual labs as a new tool in improving learning in future schools and universities. In addition, we have proposed a list of criteria for designing and producing the online virtual labs. These criteria would help the students learn our model concretely.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A general instructional design model is proposed to teach students in faculty of education, especially in department of educational technology how to design and develop online virtual labs in a common way to guide the students in refinement of the future learning environment using recent technology.
Abstract: The purpose of this work is to propose a general instructional design model to teach students in faculty of education, especially in department of educational technology how to design and develop online virtual labs in a common way. We have made analyses of previous instructional design models and related studies in regard to the virtual labs to specify diverse features of the proposed model. It was found that the online virtual labs have no conventional instructional design model, especially for designing and developing stages and also no common shape and components. Based on these results, we have reached to a new suggestion model which guides the students in refinement of the future learning environment using recent technology. In this paper, we also present a list of criteria for designing and developing the online virtual labs.as a modern principles for directing designing process of online virtual labs environments to become instructional products. We have made a derivation of these criteria from previous studies related to the virtual labs, e-Learning technologies and some miscellaneous technological resources in educational technology. These criteria would provide the students with educational and technological guidelines to produce the online virtual labs with high quality and efficiency.

17 citations


Cites background from "An Instructional Design Model for D..."

  • ...We previously claimed that the OVLs are sometimes used in blended learning where the learners can make training before and after experience in a real lab [29]....

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Proceedings ArticleDOI
02 Jun 2015
TL;DR: This paper will describe how the learning activities and the technological configurations of labs can be re-thought to address challenges for learning and for access.
Abstract: Why do some programs of study build lab work into the curriculum? Although courses across a wide variety of disciplines traditionally include lab work, there is little consistency in how those labs (even within the same discipline) are configured and even less conversation about the value of lab work to student learning. Generally speaking, labs are typically intended to help students develop procedural skills (manipulate tools, for example), explore the processes of scientific experimentation, and link theory to practice [1,2]. While most educators would agree that these goals — procedural skills, experimentation, and theoretical understanding — are listed from least-to-most important, the unfortunate truth is that they are also listed in order of easiest-to-most-difficult for both teaching and learning. This paper will describe how the learning activities and the technological configurations of labs can be re-thought to address challenges for learning and for access.

2 citations

References
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01 Jan 1985
TL;DR: This new edition of The Systematic Design of Instruction, 8/e has retained the features that have been most popular and helpful in the previous editions, while adding new perspectives and features that keep the text current.

3,084 citations

Book
01 Jan 1978
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an introduction to the instructor's role in the development of Instructional Design and Assessment Instruments, as well as developing an Instructional Strategy and developing Instructional Materials.
Abstract: Preface To the Instructor Chapter 1: Introduction to Instructional Design Chapter 2: Identifying Instructional Goals Using Front-End Analysis Chapter 3: Conducting a Goal Analysis Chapter 4: Identifying Subordinate and Entry Skills Chapter 5: Analyzing Learners and Contexts Chapter 6: Writing Performance Objectives Chapter 7: Developing Assessment Instruments Chapter 8: Developing an Instructional Strategy Chapter 9: Developing Instructional Materials Chapter 10: Designing and Conducting Formative Evalutations Chapter 11: Revising Instructional Materials Chapter 12: Designing and Conducting Summative Evaluations Glossary of Terms Index

2,614 citations

Book
01 Jun 1997
TL;DR: The role of the Instructional Designer and the role of Evaluation to Enhance Programs: Conducting Formative and Summative Evaluations are discussed.
Abstract: Preface. Chapter 1. Introduction to the Instructional Design Process. Chapter 2. Identifying the Need for Instruction. Chapter 3. Learner and Contextual Analysis. Chapter 4. Task Analysis. Chapter 5. Instructional Objectives. Chapter 6. Designing the Instructions: Sequencing. Chapter 7. Designing the Instruction: Strategies. Chapter 8. Designing the Instructional Message. Chapter 9. Developing Instructional Materials. Chapter 10. The Many Faces of Evaluation. Chapter 11. Developing Evaluation Instruments. Chapter 12. Using Evaluation to Enhance Programs: Conducting Formative and Summative Evaluations. Chapter 13. The Role of the Instructional Designer. Chapter 14. Planning and Project Management. Chapter 15. Planning for Instructional Implementation. Appendix. Problem Identification. Glossary.

1,162 citations

Book
16 Nov 2005
TL;DR: This renowned text places readers squarely in the classroom while providing a framework that teaches them to apply what they learn about computers, multimedia, Internet, distance learning, and audio/visual technologies to the 21st century classroom instruction.
Abstract: With its hallmark ASSURE technology integration model and classroom cases, this renowned text places readers squarely in the classroom while providing a framework that teaches them to apply what they learn about computers, multimedia, Internet, distance learning, and audio/visual technologies to the 21st century classroom instruction.

678 citations


"An Instructional Design Model for D..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...Others discussed the previous models of the instructional design such as ASSURE model [31], ADDIE model [32], Kemp model [33], Dik and Carey model [34], Stephen & Staley model [35],...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study proposed a multi-criteria methodology from the perspective of learner satisfaction to support those evaluation-based activities taking place at the pre- and post-adoption phases of the WELS life cycle and investigated learners' perceptions of the relative importance of decision criteria.
Abstract: The web-based e-learning system (WELS) has emerged as a new means of skill training and knowledge acquisition, encouraging both academia and industry to invest resources in the adoption of this system. Traditionally, most pre- and post-adoption tasks related to evaluation are carried out from the viewpoints of technology. Since users have been widely recognized as being a key group of stakeholders in influencing the adoption of information systems, their attitudes toward this system are pivotal. Therefore, based on the theory of multi-criteria decision making and the research products of user satisfaction from the fields of human-computer interaction and information systems, this study proposed a multi-criteria methodology from the perspective of learner satisfaction to support those evaluation-based activities taking place at the pre- and post-adoption phases of the WELS life cycle. In addition, by following this methodology, this study empirically investigated learners' perceptions of the relative importance of decision criteria. This investigation carried out a survey of college students, and the data thus obtained was then analyzed by analytic hierarchy process in order to derive an integrated preference structure of learners as a ground for evaluation. We found that learners regarded the learner interface as being the most important dimension of decision criteria. Future applications of these results are recommended and the implications are discussed.

387 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...− Related to the criteria for e-learning technologies, qualification, and evaluation [44], [45], [46], [47], [48], [49], [50], [51], and [52]....

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