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An Ordinary Warrior and His Inevitable Defeat: Representation in Post-Yugoslav Cinema

01 Jan 2020-pp 109-125
TL;DR: Murtic as discussed by the authors examines the contemporary post-Yugoslav war film, contextualizing it historically, and in light of the emergence of new film paradigms across post Yugoslav territories, wherein films are characterised by a rediscovered nationalism and a sense of victimhood, or the confirmation of stereotypes of barbarism and violence.
Abstract: This chapter examines the contemporary post-Yugoslav war film, contextualising it historically, and in light of the emergence of new film paradigms across post-Yugoslav territories. Tendencies such as the cinemas of ‘self-victimisation’ or ‘self-Balkanisation’ described by Jurica Pavicic (Postjugoslavenski film. Stil i ideologija. Zagreb: Hrvatsko filmski savez, 2011) are examined, wherein films are characterised by, respectively, a rediscovered nationalism and a sense of victimhood, or the confirmation of stereotypes of barbarism and violence. Murtic then considers the notion of ‘normalisation’ (Pavicic, Postjugoslavenski film. Stil i ideologija. Zagreb: Hrvatsko filmski savez, 2011) and its creation of an integrative space facilitating reflection on war and post-war narratives across common ground, as well as in the emergence of female directors constructing an alternative to patriarchal societies across post-Yugoslavia. Taking as its central case study, Kristian Milic’s The Living and the Dead (2007), a film which displays all the dominant characteristics of the post-Yugoslav war genre, it examines the demilitarisation of men in the context of the historical entrenchment of militaristic discourse(s) and the predominantly anti-war stance of post-Yugoslav war cinema.
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Book
28 Mar 2011
TL;DR: The first edition of "Eichmann in Jerusalem" appeared as a series of articles in "The New Yorker" in 1963 and was later published as a book in 1970 as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Hannah Arendt's portrayal of the terrible consequences of blind obedience, "Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil" contains an introduction by Amos Elon in "Penguin Classics". Sparking a flurry of heated debate, Hannah Arendt's authoritative and stunning report on the trial of German Nazi SS leader Adolf Eichmann first appeared as a series of articles in "The New Yorker" in 1963. This revised edition includes material that came to light after the trial, as well as Arendt's postscript commenting on the controversy that arose over her book. A major journalistic triumph by an intellectual of singular influence, "Eichmann in Jerusalem" is as shocking as it is informative - a meticulous and unflinching look at one of the most unsettling (and unsettled) issues of the twentieth century. Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) was for many years University Professor of Political Philosophy in the Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research and a Visiting Fellow of the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. She is also the author of "Eichmann in Jerusalem", "On Revolution", and "Between Past and Future". If you enjoyed "Eichmann in Jerusalem", you might like Elie Wiesel's "Night", available in "Penguin Modern Classics". "Deals with the greatest problem of our time ...the problem of the human being within a modern totalitarian system". (Bruno Bettelheim, "The New Republic"). "A profound and documented analysis...Bound to stir our minds and trouble our consciences". ("Chicago Tribune").

2,986 citations

Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: Regarding the Pain of Others as mentioned in this paper is a searing analysis of our numbed response to images of horror, from Goya's Disasters of War to news footage and photographs of the conflicts in Vietnam, Rwanda and Bosnia, pictures have been charged with inspiring dissent, fostering violence or instilling apathy in us, the viewer.
Abstract: Regarding the Pain of Others is Susan Sontag's searing analysis of our numbed response to images of horror. From Goya's Disasters of War to news footage and photographs of the conflicts in Vietnam, Rwanda and Bosnia, pictures have been charged with inspiring dissent, fostering violence or instilling apathy in us, the viewer. Regarding the Pain of Others will alter our thinking not only about the uses and meanings of images, but about the nature of war, the limits of sympathy, and the obligations of conscience. "Powerful, fascinating. Sontag is our outstanding contemporary writer in the moralist tradition". (Sunday Times). "A coruscating sermon on how we picture suffering". (The New York Times). "A far-reaching set of ruminations on human suffering, the nature of goodness, the lures, deceptions and truth of images ...in short, a summary of what it means to be alive and alert in the twentieth century". (Independent). "Sontag is on top form: firing devastating questions". (Los Angeles Times). "Simple, elegant, fiercely persuasive". (Metro). One of America's best-known and most admired writers, Susan Sontag was also a leading commentator on contemporary culture until her death in December 2004. Her books include four novels and numerous works of non-fiction, among them Regarding the Pain of Others, On Photography, Illness as Metaphor, At the Same Time, Against Interpretation and Other Essays and Reborn: Early Diaries 1947-1963, all of which are published by Penguin. A further eight books, including the collections of essays Under the Sign of Saturn and Where the Stress Falls, and the novels The Volcano Lover and The Benefactor, are available from Penguin Modern Classics.

2,058 citations

Book
24 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a multiperspectival cultural studies: Black Voices From Spike Lee to Rap Part II: Media Culture/Identities/Politics 5. Diagnostic Critique, Deconstruction, and Social Anxiety: Fear and Trembling in the Middle Class and Disaffected Youth 4.
Abstract: Preface and Acknowledgments Part I: Theory/Context/Methods 2. Media Culture, Politics, and Ideology: Hollywood Film in the Age of Media Politics 3. Diagnostic Critique, Deconstruction, and Social Anxiety: Fear and Trembling in the Middle Class and Disaffected Youth 4. For a Multiperspectival Cultural Studies: Black Voices From Spike Lee to Rap Part II: Media Culture/Identities/Politics 5. Reading the Gulf War: Production/Text/Reception 6. Miami Vice, Advertising, and the Construction of Postmodern Identities 8. Mapping the Present From the Future: Baudrillard and Cyberpunk Conclusion

950 citations

Book
01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe how a unit of average middle-aged Germans became the cold-blooded murderers of tens of thousands of Jews in World War II, and how they were trained to commit mass murder.
Abstract: The shocking account of how a unit of average middle-aged Germans became the cold-blooded murderers of tens of thousands of Jews.

801 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The first edition of "Eichmann in Jerusalem" appeared as a series of articles in "The New Yorker" in 1963 and was later published as a book in 1970 as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Hannah Arendt's portrayal of the terrible consequences of blind obedience, "Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil" contains an introduction by Amos Elon in "Penguin Classics". Sparking a flurry of heated debate, Hannah Arendt's authoritative and stunning report on the trial of German Nazi SS leader Adolf Eichmann first appeared as a series of articles in "The New Yorker" in 1963. This revised edition includes material that came to light after the trial, as well as Arendt's postscript commenting on the controversy that arose over her book. A major journalistic triumph by an intellectual of singular influence, "Eichmann in Jerusalem" is as shocking as it is informative - a meticulous and unflinching look at one of the most unsettling (and unsettled) issues of the twentieth century. Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) was for many years University Professor of Political Philosophy in the Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research and a Visiting Fellow of the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. She is also the author of "Eichmann in Jerusalem", "On Revolution", and "Between Past and Future". If you enjoyed "Eichmann in Jerusalem", you might like Elie Wiesel's "Night", available in "Penguin Modern Classics". "Deals with the greatest problem of our time ...the problem of the human being within a modern totalitarian system". (Bruno Bettelheim, "The New Republic"). "A profound and documented analysis...Bound to stir our minds and trouble our consciences". ("Chicago Tribune").

706 citations