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Journal Article

Ancient landscapes and the dead: the reuse of prehistoric and Roman monuments as early anglo-saxon burial sites: the reuse of prehistoric and Roman monuments as early anglo-saxon burial sites

01 Jan 1997-Medieval archaeology: Journal of the Society for Medieval Archaeology (Society for Medieval Archaeology)-Iss: 41, pp 1-32
TL;DR: The reuse of prehistoric and Roman structures by early medieval cemeteries has received much less attention and discussion as mentioned in this paper, and it is suggested that the landscape context of early Anglo-Saxon burial rites provides considerable evidence for the social and ideological significance of the dead in early Anglo Saxon society.
Abstract: THE MANY HUNDREDS of known early medieval cemeteries dated between the late 5th and early 8th centuries A.D. from southern and eastern England have largely been studied in terms of artefacts and human remains. The reuse of prehistoric and Roman structures by these burial sites has received much less attention and discussion. It is suggested that the landscape context of early Anglo-Saxon burial rites provides considerable evidence for the social and ideological significance of the dead in early Anglo-Saxon society.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a model based on the study of historic and modern migrations is developed, and its practicability is demonstrated using the example of Anglo-Saxon migration.
Abstract: A clear deficit in the theoretical and methodological development of archaeological research exists with regard to migration; attributing archaeological distribution patterns to migration as opposed to diffusion or trade is still a major problem. This article uses the example of North American colonization to develop an approach that distinguishes the changes brought about by migration from those produced by other forms of cultural transfer. Because methods for gathering evidence do not sufficiently explore migration processes in their complexity, a model based on the study of historic and modern migrations is developed, and its practicability is demonstrated using the example of Anglo‐Saxon migration.

215 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a model based on the study of historic and modern migrations is developed, and its practicability is demonstrated using the example of Anglo-Saxon migration.
Abstract: A clear deficit in the theoretical and methodological development of archaeological research exists with regard to migration ; attributing archaeological distribution patterns to migration as opposed to diffusion or trade is still a major problem. This article uses the example of North American colonization to develop an approach that distinguishes the changes brought about by migration from those produced by other forms of cultural transfer. Because methods for gathering evidence do not sufficiently explore migration processes in their complexity, a model based on the study of historic and modern migrations is developed, and its practicability is demonstrated using the example of Anglo-Saxon migration.

182 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices, and argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared'social' memories intended to link past, present and future.
Abstract: How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400–1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological discoveries, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices. He argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared 'social' memories intended to link past, present and future. Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period.

133 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore themes as diverse as: the Iron Age/Roman and Roman/Medieval transitions; Romanisation; material culture and identity; rural society; urbanism; zooarchaeology; and soldiers and civilians.
Abstract: This challenging book encourages those with an interest in Roman Britain to think broadly and to engage actively in shaping the future priorities of research into the subject. The volume reconsiders many assumptions about relations between Romans and the indigenous population and the authors explore themes as diverse as: the Iron Age/Roman and Roman/Medieval transitions; Romanisation; material culture and identity; rural society; urbanism; zooarchaeology; and soldiers and civilians. Within these themes the contributors seek to break down the relative insularity of Romano-British studies, and to open it up to new external perspectives and interdisciplinary approaches.

110 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule is discussed in this article.
Abstract: From the later third century, Germans whom the literary sources called Franks had joined with other barbarians to challenge Roman rule in Gaul. This chapter acknowledges the importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule. The kingdom in north-eastern Gaul was sometimes known simply as 'Francia'. It also came to be known as Austria or Austrasia. Although by the fifth century Orthodox Christianity provided a dominant world-view among the Roman population in Gaul, as the Franks expanded into Gaul they nevertheless retained their pagan cults, and even into the sixth century they continued to worship at pagan shrines, especially in northern Gaul. In the kingdom of Austrasia various combinations of Frankish aristocrats, Roman aristocrats and bishops competed for influence at the royal court.

96 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a model based on the study of historic and modern migrations is developed, and its practicability is demonstrated using the example of Anglo-Saxon migration.
Abstract: A clear deficit in the theoretical and methodological development of archaeological research exists with regard to migration; attributing archaeological distribution patterns to migration as opposed to diffusion or trade is still a major problem. This article uses the example of North American colonization to develop an approach that distinguishes the changes brought about by migration from those produced by other forms of cultural transfer. Because methods for gathering evidence do not sufficiently explore migration processes in their complexity, a model based on the study of historic and modern migrations is developed, and its practicability is demonstrated using the example of Anglo‐Saxon migration.

215 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a model based on the study of historic and modern migrations is developed, and its practicability is demonstrated using the example of Anglo-Saxon migration.
Abstract: A clear deficit in the theoretical and methodological development of archaeological research exists with regard to migration ; attributing archaeological distribution patterns to migration as opposed to diffusion or trade is still a major problem. This article uses the example of North American colonization to develop an approach that distinguishes the changes brought about by migration from those produced by other forms of cultural transfer. Because methods for gathering evidence do not sufficiently explore migration processes in their complexity, a model based on the study of historic and modern migrations is developed, and its practicability is demonstrated using the example of Anglo-Saxon migration.

182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors consider the striking juxtaposition of prehistoric and early medieval monuments observed at Yeavering and other sites and suggest that rather than showing continuity of ritual significance, these phenomena evidence attempts by a social elite to legitimise their position through reference to the past.
Abstract: This paper considers the striking juxtaposition of prehistoric and early medieval monuments observed at Yeavering and other sites. It suggests that rather than showing continuity of ritual significance, these phenomena evidence attempts by a social elite to legitimise their position through reference to the past. The argument is illustrated by discussion of the Northumbrian palaces in the Milfield Basin and the later reuse of the Boyne tombs.

139 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, it is argued that this practice was central to the symbolism of Anglo-Saxon mortuary practices, and was important for the construction and negotiation of origin myths, identities and social structures.
Abstract: Recent research on both old and new excavation data from Anglo‐Saxon burial sites reveals a widespread and frequent practice of reusing monuments of earlier periods. Both Roman and prehistoric structures provided the focus of cemeteries, burial groups and single graves between the late fifth and early eighth centuries AD. It is argued that this practice was central to the symbolism of Anglo‐Saxon mortuary practices, and was important for the construction and negotiation of origin myths, identities and social structures.

139 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices, and argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared'social' memories intended to link past, present and future.
Abstract: How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400–1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological discoveries, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices. He argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared 'social' memories intended to link past, present and future. Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period.

133 citations