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Book ChapterDOI

Animating Frankenstein Lands: The Place of Landscape Art in Post-mining Lands

01 Jan 2020-pp 39-54
TL;DR: The created lands of rehabilitated post-mining landform must transition from mountains of overburden to a living ecosystem, but at what point can we claim rehabilitation success? as mentioned in this paper argue that it is when relations between the human and non-human worlds are reinstated and the newly created lands become loved and storied once again.
Abstract: The created lands of rehabilitated post-mining landform must transition from mountains of overburden to a living ecosystem, but at what point can we claim rehabilitation success? I argue that it is when relations between the human and non-human worlds are reinstated and the newly created lands become loved and storied once again. Landscape art is uniquely positioned to bring land into relationship with people, to co-create stories of beginning and enact conversations about futures. Three Australian artists, who co-create with land are examined; Susan Purdy, John Wolseley and myself, Penny Dunstan. Collaborative landscape art embodies the unspeakable connections between land and people, finding the poetry that may animate our Frankenstein lands.
References
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Book
15 Jan 2008
TL;DR: A completely revised and reorganised edition of "Ecological Restoration" is presented in this article, with a focus on clarifying terminology, stressing the importance of precision in language for a field that is quickly becoming an established discipline.
Abstract: Originally published in 2007, "Ecological Restoration" has become one of the seminal books in this quickly developing field. This completely revised and reorganised edition presents up-to-date developments and current trends in the field by two of its leaders. Among its key features are: entirely new Virtual Field Trips, with additional examples woven into chapters; full treatment of the controversial topic of the restoration of semicultural ecosystems; up-to-date discussion of reference systems and reference models, which inform almost every aspect of restoration planning; and full discussion of the global issue of ecosystem impairment and the complex topics of what restoration recovery means and how it is accomplished. The authors focus on clarifying terminology, stressing the importance of precision in language for a field that is quickly becoming an established discipline. This new edition will be an invaluable resource for practitioners and theoreticians from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives, ranging from backyard volunteers to highly trained academic scientists and professional consultants.

279 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 May 2011
TL;DR: For instance, Patricia Piccinini as mentioned in this paper is a co-worker committed to taking naturecultures seriously without the soporific seductions of a return to Eden or the palpitating frisson of a jeremiad warning of the coming technological Apocalypse.
Abstract: When I first saw Patricia Piccinini’s work a few years ago, I recognized a sister in technoculture, a co-worker committed to taking ‘naturecultures’ seriously without the soporific seductions of a return to Eden or the palpitating frisson of a jeremiad warning of the coming technological Apocalypse.2 I experienced her as a compelling storyteller in the radical experimental lineage of feminist science fiction (SF). In a SF sense, Piccinini’s objects are replete with narrative speculative fabulation. Her visual and sculptural art is about worlding; i.e., ‘naturaltechnical’ worlds at stake, worlds needy for care and response, worlds full of unsettling but oddly familiar critters who turn out to be simultaneously near kin and alien colonists. Piccinini’s worlds require curiosity, emotional engagement, and investigation; and they do not yield to clean judgments or bottom lines—especially not about what is living or non-living, organic or technological, promising or threatening. Lindsay Kelley, a graduate student in my 2004 seminar in bioart and critical theory, playing brilliantly with Still Life with Stem Cells and Young Family, awakened my passion for Piccinini’s corporeal practice of ethically inquisitive fabulating in the heterogeneous media of her collaborative work habits. So I set about learning what these worlds might be like and how they invite the risk of response, of becoming someone one was not before encountering her human and non-human critters.

103 citations

Book ChapterDOI
14 Apr 2015

11 citations