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Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia

TL;DR: The first volume of the landmark philosophical project, Capitalism and Schizophrenia as mentioned in this paper, is widely regarded as the single most brilliant work of Continental philosophy of the last forty years, together with the second volume, A Thousand Plateaus.
Abstract: Is the first volume of the landmark philosophical project, Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Together with the second volume, A Thousand Plateaus, it is widely regarded as the single most brilliant work of Continental philosophy of the last forty years.
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Book
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: In this paper, the Third World Woman is presented as a singular monolithic subject in some recent (western) feminist texts, focusing on a certain mode of appropriation and codification of "scholarship" and knowledge about women in the third world by particular analytic categories employed in writings on the subject which take as their primary point of reference feminist interests as they have been articulated in the US and western Europe.
Abstract: It ought to be of some political significance at least that the term 'colonization' has come to denote a variety of phenomena in recent feminist and left writings in general. From its analytic value as a category of exploitative economic exchange in both traditional and contemporary Marxisms (cf. particularly such contemporary scholars as Baran, Amin and Gunder-Frank) to its use by feminist women of colour in the US, to describe the appropriation of their experiences and struggles by hegemonic white women's movements,' the term 'colonization' has been used to characterize everything from the most evident economic and political hierarchies to the production of a particular cultural discourse about what is called the 'Third World.'2 However sophisticated or problematical its use as an explanatory construct, colonization almost invariably implies a relation of structural domination, and a discursive or political suppression of the heterogeneity of the subject(s) in question. What I wish to analyse here specifically is the production of the 'Third World Woman' as a singular monolithic subject in some recent (western) feminist texts. The definition of colonization I invoke is a predominantly discursive one, focusing on a certain mode of appropriation and codification of 'scholarship' and 'knowledge' about women in the third world by particular analytic categories employed in writings on the subject which take as their primary point of reference feminist interests as they have been articulated in the US and western Europe. My concern about such writings derives from my own implication and investment in contemporary debates in feminist theory, and the urgent political necessity of forming strategic coalitions across class, race and national boundaries. Clearly, western feminist discourse and political practice is neither singular nor homogeneous in its goals, interests or analyses. However, it is possible to trace a coherence of

4,287 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors look at the Internet as a specific instance of the fundamental role played by free labor and highlight the connections between the digital economy and what the Italian autonomists have called the social factory.
Abstract: Working in the digital media industry is not as much fun as it is made out to be. The “NetSlaves” of the eponymous Webzine are becoming increasingly vociferous about the shamelessly exploitative nature of the job, its punishing work rhythms, and its ruthless casualization (www.disobey.com/netslaves). They talk about “24–7 electronic sweatshops” and complain about the ninety-hour weeks and the “moronic management of new media companies.” In early 1999, seven of the fifteen thousand “volunteers” of America Online (AOL) rocked the info-loveboat by asking the Department of Labor to investigate whether AOL owes them back wages for the years of playing chathosts for free.1 They used to work long hours and love it; now they are starting to feel the pain of being burned by digital media. These events point to a necessary backlash against the glamorization of digital labor, which highlights its continuities with the modern sweatshop and points to the increasing degradation of knowledge work. Yet the question of labor in a “digital economy” is not so easily dismissed as an innovative development of the familiar logic of capitalist exploitation. The NetSlaves are not simply a typical form of labor on the Internet; they also embody a complex relation to labor that is widespread in late capitalist societies. In this essay I understand this relationship as a provision of “free labor,” a trait of the cultural economy at large, and an important, and yet undervalued, force in advanced capitalist societies. By looking at the Internet as a specific instance of the fundamental role played by free labor, this essay also tries to highlight the connections between the “digital economy” and what the Italian autonomists have called the “social factory.” The “social factory” describes a process whereby “work processes have shifted from the factory to society, thereby setting in motion a truly complex machine.”2 Simultaneously voluntarily given and unwaged, enjoyed and exploited, free labor on the Net includes the activity of building Web sites, modifying software packages, reading and participating in mailing lists, and building virtual spaces on MUDs and MOOs. Far from being an Tiziana Terranova Free Labor

1,461 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The Methodology of the Oppressed as mentioned in this paper is an alternative mode of criticism opening new perspectives on a theoretical, literary, aesthetic, social movement, or psychic expression in the U.S. Third World Feminism.
Abstract: In a work with far-reaching implications, Chela Sandoval does no less than revise the genealogy of theory over the past thirty years, inserting what she terms "U.S. Third World feminism" into the narrative in a way that thoroughly alters our perspective on contemporary culture and subjectivity.What Sandoval has identified is a language, a rhetoric of resistance to postmodern cultural conditions. U.S liberation movements of the post-World War II era generated specific modes of oppositional consciousness. Out of these emerged a new activity of consciousness and language Sandoval calls the "methodology of the oppressed". This methodology -- born of the strains of the cultural and identity struggles that currently mark global exchange -- holds out the possibility of a new historical moment, a new citizen-subject, and a new form of alliance consciousness and politics. Utilizing semiotics and U.S. Third World feminist criticism, Sandoval demonstrates how this methodology mobilizes love as a category of critical analysis. Rendering this approach in all its specifics, Methodology of the Oppressed gives rise to an alternative mode of criticism opening new perspectives on a theoretical, literary, aesthetic, social movement, or psychic expression.

1,266 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors theorize Walt Disney enterprises as a storytelling organization in which an active-reactive interplay of premodern, modern, and postmodern discourses occurs, and present a post-modern analysis of the company.
Abstract: My purpose is to theorize Walt Disney enterprises as a storytelling organization in which an active-reactive interplay of premodern, modern, and postmodern discourses occurs. A postmodern analysis ...

1,188 citations


Cites background from "Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizo..."

  • ...^ Deleuze and Guattari (1987) analyzed tbe rhizome metapbor in a less bierarcbical and less linear-causal fasbion....

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  • ...Baudrillard (1987, 1988), Deleuze and Guattari (1972, 1987), and to a lesser extent, Lyotard (1984) bave advocated a return to premodern commerce and society, in wbich tribal cultures lived in more barmony witb tbeir natural environments and with each other....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A general introduction to scripting theory is offered, attempting to provide links between macrolevel considerations of sociocultural development and general theories of individual development.
Abstract: A general introduction to scripting theory is offered, attempting to provide links between macrolevel considerations of sociocultural development and general theories of individual development. The scripting of behavior is examined on three distinct levels: cultural scenarios (instruction in collective meanings), interpersonal scripts (the application of specific cultural scenarios by a specific individual in a specific social context), and intrapsychic scripts (the management of desires as experienced by the individual). These concepts of the scripting of behavior are then applied to sexual behavior. Interpersonal scripts are seen as the ordering of representations of self and other that facilitate the occurrence of a sexual act; intrapsychic scripts represent the ordering of images and desires that elicit and sustain sexual arousal. Issues of stability and change in sexual scripts are then examined in terms of the changing circumstances and requirements associated with movement through the life cycle.

1,075 citations


Cites background from "Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizo..."

  • ...It may well have been the growing number of individuals in Western societies experiencing just such a lack of congruence that made prevailing 18th and 19th century discourses on the nature of the sexual, that Foucault (1978) describes, so highly effective in gaining widespread adherence to modern Western sexual values and idealized patterns of behaivor....

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  • ...It may well have been the growing number of individuals in Western societies experiencing just such a lack of congruence that made prevailing 18th and 19th century discourses on the nature of the sexual, that Foucault (1978) describes, so highly effective in gaining widespread adherence to modern Western sexual values and idealized patterns of behaivor. Interpersonal scripting, representing the actor's response to the external world, draws heavily upon cultural scenarios, involing symbolic elements expressive of such scenarios. Among other functions, interpersonal scripting serves to lower uncertainty and heighten legitmacy for both the other or others as well as the actor himself or herself. Interpersonal scripts might be defined as the representations of self and the implied mirroring of the other that facilitates the occurrence of a sexual exchange. And while such scripts generally imply things about the internal feelings of the participants, only the representation of appropriate feelings need be manifested or confirmed. For virtually all, at one time or other, desire will follow rather than precede behavior. Interpersonal scripts represent something of an analog to Freud's (1963) concept of "the reality principle': They represent our definition of the immediate social context....

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  • ...And in doing so, seeking the sexual not in the traditional terms of biological imperatives but in terms of the natural imperatives of the human: our national dependence upon social meanings-upon symbol and metaphor-to give life to "the body without organs" (Deleuze and Guattari, 1977)....

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