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Journal ArticleDOI

Arabic Culture and Medieval European Literature@@@The Arabic Role in Medieval Literary Theory: A Forgotten Heritage

About: This article is published in Journal of the American Oriental Society.The article was published on 1991-04-01. It has received 1 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Literary theory.
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: The only surviving Arthurian romance written in Occitan, "Jaufre" as mentioned in this paper, is dedicated to a king of Aragon, and it is performed in the 13th century.
Abstract: "Jaufre" is the only surviving Arthurian romance written in Occitan: it is anonymous, and dedicated to a king of Aragon. This study, by a professional storyteller, takes a different, practical approach to the story, and comprises three parts: first, it contains a thorough investigation into the circumstances of its composition, concluding that the most likely date would have been in 1225 for the young James I of Aragon and his queen, Leonor; the dissertation then examines how the story may have been performed in the 13th century and what other stories may have been known to the audience; and finally this research had as its major aim a re-introduction of "Jaufre" to modern audiences as a piece of storytelling. The story has now been presented in English to a number of varied audiences, both academic and general, and a critical account is included of the process and of audience responses.

39 citations

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Dissertation
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: The only surviving Arthurian romance written in Occitan, "Jaufre" as mentioned in this paper, is dedicated to a king of Aragon, and it is performed in the 13th century.
Abstract: "Jaufre" is the only surviving Arthurian romance written in Occitan: it is anonymous, and dedicated to a king of Aragon. This study, by a professional storyteller, takes a different, practical approach to the story, and comprises three parts: first, it contains a thorough investigation into the circumstances of its composition, concluding that the most likely date would have been in 1225 for the young James I of Aragon and his queen, Leonor; the dissertation then examines how the story may have been performed in the 13th century and what other stories may have been known to the audience; and finally this research had as its major aim a re-introduction of "Jaufre" to modern audiences as a piece of storytelling. The story has now been presented in English to a number of varied audiences, both academic and general, and a critical account is included of the process and of audience responses.

39 citations