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Journal Article

Armed resistance to the Holocaust

01 Jan 2007-Journal on firearms and public policy (Second Amendment Foundation)-Vol. 19, Iss: 1, pp 151-169
TL;DR: The authors examines the record of violent Jewish resistance to the Holocaust and suggests that Jewish resistance was extensive, and succeeded in saving many lives, and explains that a key impediment to even more effective resistance was the lack of firearms, as well as Jewish unfamiliarity with arms during the pre-war years.
Abstract: Contrary to myth of Jewish passivity, many Jews did fight back during the Holocaust. They shut down the extermination camp at Sobibor, rose up in the Warsaw Ghetto, and fought in the woods and swamps all over Eastern Europe. Indeed, Jews resisted at a higher rate than did any other population under Nazi rule. The experience of the Holocaust shows why Jews, and all people of good will, should support the right of potential genocide victims to possess defensive arms, and refutes the notion that violence is necessarily immoral. This Article examines the record of violent Jewish resistance to the Holocaust. It suggests that Jewish resistance was extensive, and succeeded in saving many lives. The record also explains that a key impediment to even more effective resistance was the lack of firearms, as well as Jewish unfamiliarity with arms during the pre-war years. The article dispels the myth of Jewish passivity during the Holocaust, and the myth that courageous civilians with firearms are helpless against a powerful, genocidal tyranny. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1022081

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Citations
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DOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: Goldberg et al. as mentioned in this paper explored the meanings teachers make about the Holocaust from participation in Holocaust professional development at a Jewish heritage museum and found that three categories emerged of meanings teachers made, namely (1) the hopeful narrative, identity, and the emotional narrative of the Holocaust.
Abstract: MUSEUM-BASED TEACHER EDUCATION: TEACHER MEANING-MAKING AT A JEWISH HERITAGE MUSEUM David Russell Goldberg This study answers the question of what meanings teacher-participants make in Holocaust professional development at a Jewish heritage museum in a mandate state. By understanding these meanings, the educational community can better understand how a particular context and approach influences teacher meaning-making and the ways in which museum teacher education programs shape the learning of participants. Meaningmaking is a process of interpretation and understanding experiences in ways that make sense to each individual teacher. Meanings that are formed may impact teachers’ pedagogic interpretation of the Holocaust, which may in turn shape their instructional practices. This instrumental case study used multiple interviews, observations, surveys and documents to explore the meanings teachers make about the Holocaust from participation in Holocaust professional development at a Jewish heritage museum. Participants in the study included nine teachers from public schools and private Jewish schools and two professional developers from the Museum. Each participant was interviewed three times, and six different professional development programs were observed over a period of six months. Programs typically lasted from one to six days and included a presentation by museum staff, Holocaust experts, and survivors. At any museum, each representation of the Holocaust conveys particular messages and mediates Holocaust history through a particular lens. This study reveals insights about how intended aims are interpreted in Holocaust professional development. Three categories emerged of meanings teachers made, namely (1) the hopeful narrative, (2) identity, and (3) the emotional narrative of the Holocaust. This study contributes to the larger field of professional development by partially filling in an area of missing scholarship on Holocaust professional development. Findings from this study may be used to plan future professional development programs on the Holocaust, as well as on other topics, through a deeper understanding of the meanings teachers make of multiple programs at one site.

2 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identify several archaeologies of the Holocaust that relate to oppression, camouflage, concealment, deception, defiance and resistance, and view these remnants as much more than simply structural ruins.
Abstract: Holocaust landscapes should not only be analysed in terms of what they can reveal about individual events and places. It is important to view these remnants as much more than simply structural ruins. In order to consider landscapes in their totality, it is important to recognise that this diverse body of evidence represents an equally diverse range of actions and personal circumstances. This chapter identifies several archaeologies of the Holocaust that relate to oppression, camouflage, concealment, deception, defiance and resistance.

1 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this article, Nechama Tec reveals how women and men on the road to annihilation developed distinct coping strategies and how mutual cooperation and compassion operated across gender lines during the Holocaust.
Abstract: In this riveting book Nechama Tec offers insights into the differences between the experiences of Jewish women and men during the Holocaust. Her research draws on a variety of sources: wartime diaries, postwar memoirs, a range of archival materials, and most important, direct interviews with Holocaust survivors. Tec reveals how women and men on the road to annihilation developed distinct coping strategies and how mutual cooperation and compassion operated across gender lines. "Tec is able to paint a more nuanced picture of the realities of Jewish resistance than previous historians...A remarkable and important book."--Tikkun "Tec offers compelling evidence that gender-related analyses add significantly to our understanding of Jewish experiences during the Holocaust."--Jewish Book World "While this is a work of powerful emotionality, it is also a groundbreaking study of how gender is inexplicably bound to history and experience."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

64 citations