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Journal ArticleDOI

Arrangement of Micro Dielectric Particles With Vector Vortex Beam Generated by Dual-Helical Dielectric Cone

TL;DR: In this article, a dual-helical dielectric cone was proposed to generate the dual-vortex beam, which can be used to manipulate and arrange the nano-microparticles in 3D space.
Abstract: Optical vortex is of great value in optical trapping, manipulating, and arranging. Here, we propose a dual-helical dielectric cone to generate a dual-vortex beam which can be used to manipulate and arrange dielectric microparticles in three-dimensional space. With the finite-difference time-domain simulation, we calculate the electromagnetic field intensity distribution, phase, and Poynting vector during the propagation of the dual-vortex beam, the optical force and optical torque on the microparticles in the range of dual-vortex beam is also considered. In the experiment, we use the phase mask projected on spatial light modulator to generate a dual-vortex beam, which can trap, manipulate, and arrange the fluorescent microparticles to a specific and stable shape, which is consistent with the results of our simulation calculations. The dual-vortex beam generated by the dual-helical dielectric cone provides a feasible method three-dimensional optical manipulation, which is significant in biophotonical researches.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the vector vortex field of a tightly focusing system with a high numerical aperture is adjusted, and a nano-scale controllable dual-light vortex is obtained.
Abstract: In this paper, the vector vortex field of a tightly focusing system with a high numerical aperture is adjusted, and a nano-scale controllable dual-light vortex is obtained. At the same time, the topological charge m , parameter β , and phase parameter ν at the focal plane are changed by numerical simulation, and the focusing characteristics of the nano-scale controllable dual-light vortex are deeply studied, including the movement of the dual-light vortex and the energy flow. We also study the transmission characteristics in the z axis, and the results are consistent with the focusing characteristics. To analyze the manipulation ability of the two-light vortex, the corresponding gradient force distribution is calculated. At present, most research on vortex beams focuses on their topological charges on light intensity and beam shaping. There is a lack of in-depth research on nano-scale vortex beam regulation of tight focus systems under high numerical apertures. This paper innovatively modulates the nano-scale controllable dual-light vortex, which has extremely important application significance in the fields of optical communication, optical micromanipulation (high-precision manipulation), and rotation detection.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a detachable, reusable acoustic tweezer manipulation platform that is flexible and versatile is proposed for biochemical analysis and detection systems, which can be used for parallel processing and enrichment of the sample.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a spiral petal-like zone plate was used to control the topological charge of a vortex using phase modification of a spiral zone plate without transforming its geometrical shape.
Abstract: By taking advantage of spiral petal-like zone plates, we have recently demonstrated that a spiral element’s geometric shape impacts its charge. Keeping it in mind, we aim to control the topological charge of a vortex using phase modification of a spiral zone plate without transforming its geometrical shape. This is achieved by apodizing a spiral zone plate having p spiral zones with a radial grating with spatial frequency m. Having implemented some gratings with different m, we realized that an optical vortex is produced whose topological charge and its handedness depend on p and m. Consequently, a constant phase replaces on-axis screw dislocation under the situation that p takes odd multiples of m. Studies are carried out for large and small pairs of (p, m) and various gaps between the couple.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
14 Aug 2003-Nature
TL;DR: This research presents the next generation of single-beam optical traps, which promise to take optical tweezers out of the laboratory and into the mainstream of manufacturing and diagnostics and even become consumer products.
Abstract: Optical tweezers use the forces exerted by a strongly focused beam of light to trap and move objects ranging in size from tens of nanometres to tens of micrometres. Since their introduction in 1986, the optical tweezer has become an important tool for research in the fields of biology, physical chemistry and soft condensed matter physics. Recent advances promise to take optical tweezers out of the laboratory and into the mainstream of manufacturing and diagnostics; they may even become consumer products. The next generation of single-beam optical traps offers revolutionary new opportunities for fundamental and applied research.

4,647 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Arthur Ashkin1
TL;DR: In this paper, it is hypothesized that similar acceleration and trapping are possible with atoms and molecules using laser light tuned to specific optical transitions, and the implications for isotope separation and other applications of physical interest are discussed.
Abstract: Micron-sized particles have been accelerated and trapped in stable optical potential wells using only the force of radiation pressure from a continuous laser. It is hypothesized that similar accelerations and trapping are possible with atoms and molecules using laser light tuned to specific optical transitions. The implications for isotope separation and other applications of physical interest are discussed.

4,516 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Arthur Ashkin1
TL;DR: It is shown that good trapping requires high convergence beams from a high numerical aperture objective and a comparison is given of traps made using bright field or differential interference contrast optics and phase contrast optics.

1,609 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of plasmon-based optical traps can be found in this paper, which summarizes the recent advances in the emerging field and discusses the potential applications to bioscience and quantum optics.
Abstract: Conventional optical tweezers, formed at the diffraction-limited focus of a laser beam, have become a powerful and flexible tool for manipulating micrometre-sized objects. Extending optical trapping down to the nanometre scale would open unprecedented opportunities in many fields of science, where such nano-optical tweezers would allow the ultra-accurate positioning of single nano-objects. Among the possible strategies, the ability of metallic nanostructures to control light at the subwavelength scale can be exploited to engineer such nano-optical traps. This Review summarizes the recent advances in the emerging field of plasmon-based optical trapping and discusses the details of plasmon tweezers along with their potential applications to bioscience and quantum optics.

1,255 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The state-of-the-art in optical trapping at the nanoscale is reviewed, with an emphasis on some of the most promising advances, such as controlled manipulation and assembly of individual and multiple nanostructures, force measurement with femtonewton resolution, and biosensors.
Abstract: Optical trapping and manipulation of micrometre-sized particles was first reported in 1970. Since then, it has been successfully implemented in two size ranges: the subnanometre scale, where light-matter mechanical coupling enables cooling of atoms, ions and molecules, and the micrometre scale, where the momentum transfer resulting from light scattering allows manipulation of microscopic objects such as cells. But it has been difficult to apply these techniques to the intermediate - nanoscale - range that includes structures such as quantum dots, nanowires, nanotubes, graphene and two-dimensional crystals, all of crucial importance for nanomaterials-based applications. Recently, however, several new approaches have been developed and demonstrated for trapping plasmonic nanoparticles, semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanostructures. Here we review the state-of-the-art in optical trapping at the nanoscale, with an emphasis on some of the most promising advances, such as controlled manipulation and assembly of individual and multiple nanostructures, force measurement with femtonewton resolution, and biosensors.

855 citations