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Journal ArticleDOI

Assessing leader behaviors in project managers

24 Dec 2007-Management Research News (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)-Vol. 31, Iss: 1, pp 4-11
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the leadership style of graduate project management students vs other MBA students and find that those with a balance between concern for task and concern for people leadership styles are good candidates for project management positions as well as training/education in project management.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this research was to explore the leadership style of graduate project management students vs other MBA students.Design/methodology/approach – Graduate project management and MBA students attending a regional comprehensive university in USA returned surveys that assess their leadership style emphasis of concern for task or concern for people.Findings – Project management students rate themselves significantly higher on the concern for people leadership style and were found to have a balance between the concern for task and concern for people leadership style vs MBA students.Practical implications – Individuals exhibiting a concern for people leadership style and those with a balance between concern for task and concern for people leadership styles are good candidates for project management positions as well as training/education in project management.Originality/value – The paper shows that the selection and training of project managers based on bahavioral tendencies can relate to ...
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the mediating role of team-building is proposed as a possible explanation of the relationship between transformational leadership and project success. But, the results of the study indicate that teambuilding partially mediates the effect of transformational leaders on project success, which is not known about the mechanisms that explain this effect.

298 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explored how major engineering and construction companies view PM maturity and PM3s in order to develop and improve their PM practices, and found that these kinds of organizations are mainly project-intensive, objective oriented, and have the capabilities to perform overall business development initiatives.

103 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role of a project manager in large-scale project management has been discussed in this paper, where the authors highlight the dual-leadership role required of the project manager and highlight the importance of solid leadership skills for effective project management.
Abstract: Introduction Project management emerged as a methodology for managing initiatives that not only focused on creating a one-time product or prototype but also required the expertise of individuals from cross-departmental boundaries. Most large-scale projects required input and personnel from functional, technical and support departments working under the auspices of a project manager. In response, many companies migrated from the traditional hierarchy organizational structure to a matrix organizational structure designed to spread scarce technical manpower resources throughout large-scale, cross-departmental projects. In large-scale organizations, project managers oversee two types of subordinate groups. One group includes project team members permanently assigned to the project office and solely under the project manager's authority. The second group consists of subject matter experts from the organization's functional, technical, and support departments who are temporarily attached to the project team but remain assigned to their parent department. Those employees are responsible to both their department supervisor and the project manager (Dunn, 2001; Harrison, 1981, p. 17). This dual-leadership role required of the project manager underscores the importance of solid leadership skills for effective project management. Smaller organizations may not maintain a permanent Project Office, and the project manager resides within the functional organization. The physical arrangement, however, does not diminish the complex role of the typical project manager. The project manager is responsible for meeting project objectives, for schedules, budgets, and assessing alternatives, for assessing risks and deciding how to accept, avoid, remove, or mitigate them, and for leading the initiative to successful completion (Baca, 2007; DiVincenzo, 2006; Dunn, 2001; Zielinski, 2005). Managers of the functional, technical, and support departments provide personnel and technical assistance to the project manager, yet retain responsibility for their tools, training, performance evaluation, and reassignment (Jacques, Garger, & Thomas, 2008; Wellman, 2007). A further complication of the project manager's role stems from the multi-dimensional environment in which s/he functions. At the core of day-to-day operations is the project office and the project team. A second dimension is the intra-organization--the parent organization, user community, and contractor(s). And a third dimension is the inter-organization--external organizations having a vested interest, or oversight authority in the project office. This complex environment presents a communication paradigm unparalleled by any other management position: The team is often large in number and consists of a multi-faceted mix of multi-disciplinary, inter-organizational, geographically disbursed members, internally employed personnel, and outsourced or contract staff; the project manager must cope with tenuous lines of authority and power; and the project manager must interact with multiple, varied groups and stakeholders inside and outside of the employing organization, often with conflicting interests relevant to the project at hand (Gillard, 2005). As stated by Zielinski (2005, p. 18), "these 'accidental' [project] managers must simultaneously satisfy the needs of often finicky clients, adhere to tight deadlines, and marshal limited or sometimes nonexistent resources to get the job done--all while shepherding, motivating and cajoling a diverse universe of personalities up and down the organizational food chain. They are held accountable for project results, but often have little power over personnel or resource matters--and they must find a way to get things done without ruffling too many feathers, because the next project on the docket might involve many of the same people." Responsibility without authority is yet another challenge that the project manager faces. …

89 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of previous studies suggests the need to examine far more mediator and moderator variables in future research using a style perspective given the variable contexts affecting project and leadership effectiveness as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Purpose – This editorial aims to introduce the special issue on leadership in projects and to highlight salient points from the background literature in this in order to place the articles contained in this special issue in context.Design/methodology/approach – A summary of key findings from the literature relating to leadership in projects is provided highlighting limitations with previous research and challenges for research in this area.Findings – Much of the literature relating to leadership in projects has adopted primarily a style perspective of leadership and the results from a number of studies show a number of inconsistencies. Generally many of the findings are additive and an overall theory of leadership in projects has yet to emerge. Findings from the review of previous studies suggest the need to examine far more mediator and moderator variables in future research using a style perspective given the variable contexts affecting project and leadership effectiveness. In addition, alternative pers...

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe and discuss how project managers practice a coaching leadership style (CLS), which is based on a case study of an organization practicing coaching in projects, and describe how a model consisting of two learning processes can help to implement a CLS in practice.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss how project managers practice a coaching leadership style (CLS). Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on a case study of an organization practicing coaching in projects. Findings The research findings show that to succeed with a CLS, project managers must have a large toolbox, which includes signature strengths, self-management and a give culture. Further, the paper describes how a model consisting of two learning processes can help to implement a CLS in practice. Research limitations/implications This study is exploratory, contributing to the development of a substantive theory. Theory testing as well as more in-depth investigation of mental models of a CLS would be valuable. Practical implications Coaching leadership theories offer insights that can be leveraged to make project management more effective through improved research foundations. Originality/value This paper focuses on how a CLS is carried out in projects and how it can be improved and should thus be of interest to managers searching for tools and models for effective leadership.

34 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate job seekers' and new employees' subjective person-organization (P-O) fit perceptions and find that P-O fit perceptions predict both job choice intentions and work attitudes, even after controlling for the attractiveness of job attributes.

1,574 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argued that women have some advantages in typical leadership style but suffer some disadvantages from prejudicial evaluations of their competence as leaders, especially in masculine organizational contexts, and pointed out that women are more likely than men to lead in a style that is effective under contemporary conditions.
Abstract: Journalists and authors of trade books increasingly assert a female advantage in leadership, whereby women are more likely than men to lead in a style that is effective under contemporary conditions. Contrasting our analysis of these claims with Vecchio's [Leadersh. Q. 13 (2002) 643] analysis, we show that women have some advantages in typical leadership style but suffer some disadvantages from prejudicial evaluations of their competence as leaders, especially in masculine organizational contexts. Nonetheless, more women are rising into leadership roles at all levels, including elite executive roles. We suggest reasons for this rise and argue that organizations can capture the symbols of progressive social change and modernity by appointments of women in key positions.

1,283 citations


"Assessing leader behaviors in proje..." refers result in this paper

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Book
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: In this paper, a half-dozen or so people concerning their view of their organization's mission, vision, principles and values and fail to receive consistent, compatible, and unified answers, they should question to what extent the sharing actually exists.
Abstract: If you ask a half–dozen or so people concerning their view of your organization’s mission, vision, principles and values and fail to receive consistent, compatible, and unified answers, then you should question to what extent the sharing actually exists...

1,208 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: It is argued that organizations need both managers and leaders to succeed, but developing both requires a reduced focus on logic and strategic exercises in favor of an environment where creativity and imagination are permitted to flourish.
Abstract: The traditional view of management, back in 1977 when Abraham Zaleznik wrote this article, centered on organizational structure and processes. Managerial development at the time focused exclusively on building competence, control, and the appropriate balance of power. That view, Zaleznik argued, omitted the essential leadership elements of inspiration, vision, and human passion which drive corporate success. The difference between managers and leaders, he wrote, lies in the conceptions they hold, deep in their psyches, of chaos and order. Managers embrace process, seek stability and control, and instinctively try to resolve problems quickly--sometimes before they fully understand a problems significance. Leaders, in contrast, tolerate chaos and lack of structure and are willing to delay closure to understand the issues more fully. In this way, Zaleznik argued, business leaders have much more in common with artists, scientists, and other creative thinkers than they do with managers. Organizations need both managers and leaders to succeed, but developing both requires a reduced focus on logic and strategic exercises in favor of an environment where creativity and imagination are permitted to flourish.

1,163 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors survey the recent literature on project management to determine whether project management researchers consider leadership style a critical success factor when managing projects and whether they believe leadership style impacts project outcome.
Abstract: The literature on general management research often identifies leadership style as a critical success factor impacting individual and organizational performance. In this paper, commissioned by the Project Management Institute, the authors survey the recent literature on project management to determine whether project management researchers consider leadership style a critical success factor when managing projects and whether they believe leadership style impacts project outcome. This paper opens by outlining the purpose of this study and then describing the general management literature on leadership styles and competence in relation to four elements: 20th century leadership theory; team behavior; managerial behavior; and leadership competence. It then looks at the literature on project management and discusses the research on the relationship between a project manager's leadership style and competence and project outcome and success. It then identifies and explains six points concerning the project manager leadership style and competence that researchers have most frequently explored. The paper concludes by detailing this review's findings and by suggesting ideas on this topic that researchers could further explore. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR Copyright of Project Management Journal is the property of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. / Education and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract.

735 citations