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Journal ArticleDOI

Assessing student learning by way of drama and visual art: A semiotic mix in a course on cognitive development

01 Dec 2011-Education As Change (Taylor & Francis Group)-Vol. 15
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe an atypical multimodal approach to assessment in a pre-service teacher education course and report on the use of a semiotic mix of drama and visual art as alternative ways to assess students' learning.
Abstract: This article describes an atypical multimodal approach to assessment in a pre-service teacher education course. The author argues that many students enter programmes at South African universities with an underdeveloped competence in academic English. She argues that although they are learning English as an academic language, their learning is evaluated in written language via summative assessments that require verbal fluency. In this article the author reports on the use of a semiotic mix of drama and visual art as well as social learning experiences, as alternative ways to assess students’ learning. Components of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are put forward as a theoretical framework for the course and assessment design, focusing on the flexibility of presentation and student engagement, and support for students who are still struggling with English academic language proficiency. The significance of the article lies in the analysis of the outcome of the multimodal approach to assessment, ...
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the unity of theory and practice in teacher education has been explored, with the aim of restoring, to whatever extent this is possible, the unity between theory and the doing of teaching.
Abstract: A common view of theory and practice as domains is that it is difficult, if not impossible, to traverse the epistemological chasm between them After all, theories are ways of organising our world abstractly in ideas and concepts Practice is the world that we inhabit empirically It is a tangible world that we can see, feel, act on, act in, and so on So, how can one even begin to argue that these apparently disparate worlds can be unified or that they are in the first instance not separate at all? My stance on this is that we, the educators of teachers, are party to the separation In fact, we teach students that they should ‘apply’ theory to practice Working with our own struggle at the university where I am based, I will argue that there may be ways of opening the borders between what is, on the one hand a philosophical question, and on the other, a purely empirical question How do we teach and how do we teach the doing of teaching? My argument explores one way we might begin to restore; to whatever extent this is possible, the unity of theory and practice in teacher education

21 citations


Cites background from "Assessing student learning by way o..."

  • ...One of the teacher educators, Lara Ragpot (2011) offers a module on cognitive development of children in the early years....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue for a specific view of pre-service teacher education, in which students are given the opportunity to seriously study the content of the subjects they will be teaching, while learning some skills to deliver the school curriculum and to begin to understand, and deal with, learners' sociological and psychological dispositions.
Abstract: Starting from current views on pre-service teacher education, this article presents the findings of an inquiry into new teachers’ perceptions of their university education. The authors argue for a specific view of pre-service teacher education, in which students are given the opportunity to seriously study the content of the subjects they will be teaching, while learning some skills to deliver the school curriculum and to begin to understand, and deal with, learners’ sociological and psychological dispositions. They also argue that the expectation that universities should prepare teachers fully for practice is not feasible, as the school itself as a place of work is the optimal setting for getting to know – in an authentic and non-trivialising way – the hardships and challenges of what constitutes teaching in a country like South Africa. The findings of the study show that teachers are confident about their preparation in content knowledge. They are also comfortable with some aspects of pedagogy,...

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose that theory and practice, as the science and the craft of teaching, are reciprocal and interfacing, and they suggest the analogy of "bootstrapping" as a way of thinking about the epistemologies of theories and practices in tandem.
Abstract: The authors of this article propose that theory and practice, as the science and the craft of teaching, are reciprocal and interfacing. To manifest this construct in teacher preparation courses, they suggest the analogy of ‘bootstrapping’ as a way of thinking about the epistemologies of theory and practice in tandem. With this analogy in mind, they explore the use of a specific curriculum tool to bring theory and practice closer together. Survey and interview data in a study they conducted indicate that new teachers’ experience of their first year or two in the workplace is largely positive with regard to what they think they know and can do pedagogically, while revealing that they nevertheless perceive themselves as unprepared to cross the boundary into the workplace. The authors conclude that more can be done in teacher education programmes to amalgamate the epistemologies and the discourses of the science and the craft of pedagogy in non-clinical work.

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored novice foundation phase teachers' descriptions of their experiences in the liminal stage between being a student teacher and entering the professional world of the early grade classroom and found that the new teachers appeared to be somewhat unrealistic and/or unprepared in their expectations of what they would encounter in this period.
Abstract: This paper explores novice foundation phase teachers’ descriptions of their experiences in the liminal stage between being a student teacher and entering the professional world of the early grade classroom. The term “liminality” was popularised by anthropologist Turner (1969), building on the early work of Van Gennep (1960), in his work on rites of passage. The fluidity of the liminal period is characterised by instability and uncertainty with a diversity of factors affecting different novice teachers. In a generic qualitative study, based on individual, semi-structured interviews with 10 participants, findings show that the new teachers appeared to be somewhat unrealistic and/or unprepared in their expectations of what they would encounter in this period. The novices struggled to settle into the practice of a school classroom and largely blame the inadequacy of their teacher education programmes. They also cite the demands of tracking their young charges’ learning and the lack of support from senior teachers as compounding factors for the difficulties they faced. These issues may have serious consequences for the retention of teachers in this important phase of schooling and therefore require the attention of both teacher education and school managers. Keywords: early grades; foundation phase teachers; liminality; novice teacher; primary school teachers; rite of passage; teacher induction

17 citations


Cites background from "Assessing student learning by way o..."

  • ...In addition, new teachers require a solid understanding of children’s development (Ragpot, 2013) to develop the pedagogical dexterity to match teaching methods to each child’s developmental stages in the first three grades of school....

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  • ...In addition, new teachers require a solid understanding of children’s development (Ragpot, 2013) to develop the pedagogical dexterity to match teaching methods to each child’s developmental stages in the first three grades of school....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2019
TL;DR: The authors examined the perspectives that instructional designers at a 4-year research institution in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States have about integrating UDL strategies into the online course development process.
Abstract: This qualitative case study design examined the perspectives that instructional designers at a 4-year research institution in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States have about integrating UDL strategies into the online course development process. The participants were six individuals involved in the online course development process: four of the participants were instructional designers working for the Instructional Design Team, one participant was an assistant program manager in the Office of Distance Education, and the other was an instructional designer working in the College of Health and Human Services. The interviews focused on the participant’s perspectives on the integration of UDL strategies and how they believe faculty perceived such practices. Using a series of semi-structured interviews and document analysis, three distinct themes emerged: (a) the importance of the instructional designer/faculty member partnership, (b) the number of factors impacting faculty adoption of UDL strategies in their online courses, and (c) faculty resistance to changes in how classroom accommodations are addressed in the higher education classroom. In addition to highlighting factors impacting the integration of UDL strategies, the findings also revealed techniques that could be useful in improving faculty adoption of such practices.

16 citations


Cites background from "Assessing student learning by way o..."

  • ...…& Duncan, 2013; Catalano, 2014; Dotger, 2011; Habib et al., 2012; Simoncelli & Hinson, 2008), students who speak English as a second language (Ragpot, 2011), or simply to create a more inclusive classroom environment (Kumar, 2010; Nielsen, 2013), research shows that both faculty and students…...

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  • ..., 2012; Simoncelli & Hinson, 2008), students who speak English as a second language (Ragpot, 2011), or simply to create a more inclusive classroom environment (Kumar, 2010; Nielsen, 2013), research shows that both faculty and students have positive attitudes with respect to the implementation of UDL in the higher education classroom....

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References
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Book
01 Jan 1978

13,106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors report changes in teacher efficacy from entry into a teacher preparation program through the induction year and found significant increases in efficacy during student teaching, but significant declines during the first year of teaching.

1,695 citations


"Assessing student learning by way o..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Ross (1998, cited in Hoy & Spero 2005 ) argues that higher-quality learning in a pre-service teacher education programme would translate into improved teaching practice and greater self-efficacy in students’ ability to direct teaching tasks....

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Book
Susan Carey1
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: Carey argues that the key to understanding cognitive development lies in recognizing conceptual discontinuities in which new representational systems emerge that have more expressive power than core cognition and are also incommensurate with core cognition as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Only human beings have a rich conceptual repertoire with concepts like tort, entropy, Abelian group, mannerism, icon and deconstruction. How have humans constructed these concepts? And once they have been constructed by adults, how do children acquire them? While primarily focusing on the second question, in The Origin of Concepts, Susan Carey shows that the answers to both overlap substantially. Carey begins by characterizing the innate starting point for conceptual development, namely systems of core cognition. Representations of core cognition are the output of dedicated input analyzers, as with perceptual representations, but these core representations differ from perceptual representations in having more abstract contents and richer functional roles. Carey argues that the key to understanding cognitive development lies in recognizing conceptual discontinuities in which new representational systems emerge that have more expressive power than core cognition and are also incommensurate with core cognition and other earlier representational systems. Finally, Carey fleshes out Quinian bootstrapping, a learning mechanism that has been repeatedly sketched in the literature on the history and philosophy of science. She demonstrates that Quinian bootstrapping is a major mechanism in the construction of new representational resources over the course of childrens cognitive development. Carey shows how developmental cognitive science resolves aspects of long-standing philosophical debates about the existence, nature, content, and format of innate knowledge. She also shows that understanding the processes of conceptual development in children illuminates the historical process by which concepts are constructed, and transforms the way we think about philosophical problems about the nature of concepts and the relations between language and thought.

1,688 citations