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Journal ArticleDOI

Assessing the Expectations and Limitations of ASEAN-EU Counter-Terrorism Cooperation

02 Aug 2020-Journal of Asean Studies (Universitas Bina Nusantara)-Vol. 8, Iss: 1, pp 61-80
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the inter-regional security cooperation between ASEAN and the EU with a specific focus on counterterrorism and found that CT cooperation is about facilitating a more comprehensive security governance cooperation where European standards and experience are transferred to Southeast Asia for purposes of regional security and diplomatic relations.
Abstract: This research examines the inter-regional security cooperation between ASEAN and the EU with a specific focus on counterterrorism. The research methods are based on a comparison of regional counterterrorism governance between the two regions and a close reading of Plan of Actions for the enhancement of ASEAN-EU relations documents from 2007 to 2018. The results show that CT cooperation is about facilitating a more comprehensive security governance cooperation where European standards and experience are transferred to Southeast Asia for purposes of regional security and diplomatic relations. In addition, this research also shows that EU-ASEAN CT cooperation has not been geared specifically to combat radicalism, or as part of a Counter Violent Extremism program; rather, the inter-regional cooperation has mainly focused on building a common normative framework in responding to terrorism within the corridor of democracy and preempting the terrorist networks from exploiting connectivity networks. Finally, implementation of security and political cooperation between the EU and ASEAN tend to rely on the existing extra-regional dialogue fora within ASEAN as well as direct engagement between the EU and third parties comprising each of the ASEAN states.

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Journal ArticleDOI
09 Aug 2022
TL;DR: In this article , the authors examined how Pro-IS terrorists exploit loopholes in border and immigration control to join IS abroad and the shortcoming in Indonesian government strategy to counter their mobility, and found that Indonesia needs improvement in human resources, law enforcement, immigration management, border control, as well as cross-border cooperation.
Abstract: Transnational terrorism has been a worldwide challenge, especially after the declaration of Islamic State (IS) that was based in Syria and Iraq in 2014. By 2017, most foreign terrorist fighters (FTFs) from Southeast Asia were Indonesian nationals, of almost 700 individuals. The actual number might be higher as some departed to Syria and other destination countries, like Afghanistan, the Philippines, and India, undetected. The research aimed to examine how Pro-IS terrorists exploit loopholes in border and immigration control to join IS abroad and the shortcoming in Indonesian government strategy to counter their mobility. The novelty of the research rested on its use of Supreme Court’s record of 38 Pro-IS deportees to build a dataset of their profile and travel history from 2016 to 2020. Profile of individual deportee was categorized into demography, affiliation, and funding. Travel history was mapped in accordance with the point of departure in Indonesia, transit country, final destination, and location where the arrest took place- which then led to deportation. The research finds that Indonesia needs improvement in human resources, law enforcement, immigration management, border control, as well as cross-border cooperation.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
20 Jul 2022
TL;DR: Gülzau et al. as discussed by the authors discussed that connectivity enables a regional integration project to be economically sustainable and resilient against external shocks, and that regional integration should facilitate the mobility of welcomed and trusted travellers while concentrating their control resources on those prone to irregular forms of migration.
Abstract: It has been widely discussed in the literature on regionalism that connectivity and mobility are two critical concepts that underpin the deepening of the regional integration project. Connectivity allows increased mobility of ideas, people, and goods, creating a more robust regional community. Connectivity enables a regional integration project to be economically sustainable and resilient against external shocks (Bhattacharyay, 2010). Arguably, regional integration should facilitate the mobility of welcomed and trusted travellers while concentrating their control resources on those prone to ‘irregular’ forms of migration. As a result, regional integration often deepens the establishment or reconfiguration of mobility spaces (Gülzau et al., 2016).
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the social theory of globalisation and its effects on policing in general and the education of crisis negotiators in particular, and provide an introduction to the theory and its various forms, and their implications and linkages to terrorism.
Abstract: This paper explores the social theory of Globalisation and its effects on policing in general and the education of crisis negotiators in particular. This paper provides an introduction to the theory of globalisation discussing its various forms, and their implications and linkages to terrorism. Throughout this paper the relevance of these issues for the education of police negotiators is considered.

5 citations


"Assessing the Expectations and Limi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Ideologies that drive violence extremism in one corner of the globe may become the driver of acts of terrorism in another (Klein, 2006)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss bilateral and subregional cooperation involving two or three countries, emphasizing capacity building and training, and conclude with a look at the progress towards regional counter-terrorism strategies and which efforts need additional attention and resources.
Abstract: Although the most critical part of the fight against Islamic terrorism has to be waged by individual states within their national borders, given the nature of today's threat, cooperation between states is crucial. Changes in the nature of terrorist organizations have also increased the demands on international cooperation. This paper discusses bilateral and subregional cooperation involving two or three countries. It looks at the regional level response, emphasizing capacity building and training. Most effort has taken place under the aegis of ASEAN and organizations or forums linked to ASEAN, in particular the ASEAN Regional Forum; since 9/11, however, the Asia‐Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) has also adopted an active counter‐terrorism agenda. The paper will conclude with a look at the progress towards regional counter‐terrorism strategies and which efforts need additional attention and resources.

3 citations


"Assessing the Expectations and Limi..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...After the 9/11, ASEAN member-states re-framed the definition of terrorism acts, particularly ones that came from an Islamic background—in which many transnational crimes were reclassified into terrorism (Singh, 2009)....

    [...]

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the impact of democratic transitions in Southeast Asia on regional co-operation and the relationship between this process and the development of a non-official regionalism is explored.
Abstract: This article explores the impact of democratic transitions in Southeast Asia on regional co-operation, and the relationship between this process and the development of a non-official regionalism. Until now, regionalism in Southeast Asia has been essentially elite-centred and politically illiberal. The emergence of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations was founded upon the common desire of its members, which had by then retreated significantly from their postcolonial experiments in liberal democracy, to ensure regime survival. This orientation was further institutionalised by ASEAN'S doctrine of non-interference, which helped to shield its members from outside pressures towards democratisation. But with democratisation in the Philippines, Thailand and more recently Indonesia, the ASEAN model of elite-centric regional socialisa- tion has been challenged. The civil society in the region demands greater open- ness in Southeast Asian regionalism. The article proposes a conceptual frame- work for analysing the relationship between democratisation and regionalism, with the key argument being that the displacement of traditional patterns of regional elite socialisation has been offset by potential gains such as advances in regional conflict management, transparency and rule-based interactions. But the realisation of a more 'participatory regionalism' in Southeast Asia faces a number of barriers, including obstacles to further democratisation, the continued salience of the non-interference doctrine and the diminished space for civil society in the wake of the 11 September terrorist attacks. This article explores how traditional modes of regional interaction in Southeast Asia are undergoing transformation as a result of rapid changes in domestic political structures. The key force for change identified here is democratisation. Unlike in Europe, regional institution building in Southeast Asia was not founded upon a shared commitment to liberal democracy. The founding of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was helped by the common desire of its members to ensure the survival of regimes which had by then retreated signifi- cantly from their postcolonial experiments in liberal democracy. This orientation was further institutionalised by ASEAN'S doctrine of non-interference, which helped to shield its members from outside pressures towards democratisation.

3 citations