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Book ChapterDOI

Assessment of Iran’s Language Planning: Results

01 Jan 2020-pp 63-78
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the outcomes of the official plan by the highest authority for the Persian language policy in Iran, the Academy of Persian Language and Literature, to confront English abbreviated forms borrowed into Persian.
Abstract: In the following chapter, I will categorize and then analyze the data. This will allow me to assess the flexibility of Persian morphology in coining abbreviated forms as well as the relative productivity of each of abbreviation method used in English and Persian. This chapter examines the outcomes of the official plan by the highest authority for the Persian language policy in Iran, the Academy of Persian Language and Literature, to confront English abbreviated forms borrowed into Persian. The quantitatively and qualitatively limited capacity of the Persian language in forming abbreviated forms makes the implementation of the current plan very challenging. The results of this study provide evidence-based material that should be considered in the context of language and/or terminology planning, technical writing, teaching and translation.
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Book
30 Apr 1979
TL;DR: This popular introductory linguistics text is unique for its integration of themes and provides a sound introduction to linguistic methodology while encouraging students to consider why people are intrinsically interested in language―the ultimate puzzle of the human mind.
Abstract: This popular introductory linguistics text is unique for its integration of themes Rather than treat morphology, phonetics, phonology, syntax, and semantics as completely separate fields, the book shows how they interact. It provides a sound introduction to linguistic methodology while encouraging students to consider why people are intrinsically interested in language-the ultimate puzzle of the human mind.

738 citations

Book
25 Oct 2004
TL;DR: This book discusses Morphology and Morphological Analysis, and a brief survey of Kujamaat Joola syntax, as well as Derivation and Semantics, and two Approaches to Morphology: Item- and-Arrangement, Item-and-Process and The Lexicon.
Abstract: Preface.Abbreviations.1. Thinking about Morphology and Morphological Analysis:.1.1 What is Morphology?.1.2 Morphemes.1.3 Morphology in Action.1.4 Foundational Beliefs.1.5 Introduction to Morphological Analysis.1.6 Summary.Introduction to Kujamaat Joola.Exercises.2. Words and Lexemes:.2.1 What is a Word?.2.2 Empirical Tests for Wordhood.2.3 Types of Words.2.4 Inflection vs. Derivation.2.5 Two Approaches to Morphology: Item-and-Arrangement, Item-and-Process.2.6 The Lexicon.2.7 Summary.Kujamaat Joola Noun Classes.Exercises.3. Morphology and Phonology:.3.1 Allomorphs.3.2 Prosodic Morphology.3.3 Primary and Secondary Affixes.3.4 Linguistic Exaptation, Leveling, and Analogy.3.5 Morphophonology and Secret Languages.3.6 Summary.Kujamaat Joola Morphophonology.Exercises.4. Derivation and the Lexicon:.4.1 The Saussurean Sign.4.2 Motivation and Compositionality.4.3 Derivation and Structure.4.4 Summary.Derivation in Kujamaat Joola.Exercises.5. Derivation and Semantics:.5.1 The Polysemy Problem.5.2 The Semantics of Derived Lexemes.5.3 Summary.Derivation and verbs in Kujamaat Joola.Exercises.6. Inflection:.6.1 What is Inflection?.6.2 Inflection vs. Derivation.6.3 Inventory of Inflectional Morphology Types.6.4 Syncretism.6.5 Typology.6.6 Summary.Agreement in Kujamaat Joola.Exercises.7. Morphology and Syntax:.7.1 Morphological vs. Syntactic Inflection.7.2 Structural constraints on morphological inflection.7.3 Inflection and Universal Grammar.7.4 Grammatical function changing.7.5 Summary.Kujamaat Joola verb morphology.A brief survey of Kujamaat Joola syntax.Exercises.8. Morphological Productivity:.8.1 What is morphological productivity?.8.2 Productivity and structure: Negative prefixes in English.8.3 Degrees of productivity.8.4 Salience and productivity.8.5 Testing productivity.8.6 Conclusion.Exercises.Glossary.References.Index

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the first three articles treating functional shift, blends, and back-formations (Cannon 1985, 1986; Cannon and Bailey 1986) are reviewed, possible solutions to presently untenable definitions and other problems will be offered, and a large corpus of recent items in the two categories will be analyzed.
Abstract: THIS IS THE FOURTH ARTICLE IN A SERIES about categories of English word-formation-the first three articles treating functional shift, blends, and back-formations (Cannon 1985, 1986; Cannon and Bailey 1986). Collections of abbreviations and acronyms and the considerable scholarship on these two categories will be reviewed, possible solutions to presently untenable definitions and other problems will be offered, and a large corpus of recent items in the two categories will be analyzed. This study has the advantage of drawing on vastly more numerous written data and building on a comprehensive earlier study-Algeo's article (1975), which summarizes the overlapping terminology and the scholarship to that date. This study will update his data and findings, especially in light of the large corpus that we will describe. It will simultaneously update the overall analysis of all 21 categories in Cannon's total 13,683item corpus (1987), and make some comparisons with other categories. The results may shed light on lexicology and lexical theory, the dynamic relations between writing and speech, and the seeming state of the art, as it were, for abbreviations and acronyms.

80 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: One manifestation of cultural change in the language is seen in "linguistic borrowing" which, both as a general linguistic and cultural phenomenon, and as a process related to particular languages, has attracted the attention of a great number of scholars as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: 1.1.1. It has been said that ‘the interrelation of language and other aspects of culture is so close that no part of the culture of a particular group canproperly be studied without reference to the linguistic symbols in use’.1 One manifestation of cultural change in the language is seen in ‘linguisticborrowing’, which, both as a general linguistic and cultural phenomenon, andas a process related to particular languages, has attracted the attention of a great number of scholars, including many linguists.2

8 citations

BookDOI
02 Aug 2018
TL;DR: The chapter intends to describe the atmosphere which motivated the need for the emergence of this institution in Iran and to evaluate the contributions and activities of the first and the third academies in Iran more fruitful both quantitatively and qualitatively than the endeavours of the second Iranian academy.
Abstract: In this chapter, the Academy of Persian Language and Literature is introduced in the context of an eighty-year-old history of the establishment of the Academy in Iran. The chapter intends to describe the atmosphere which motivated the need for the emergence of this institution in Iran. It seems to be fair to claim that word selection, and more technically terminology, has been the central concern of the three Iranian academies of the Persian language. It also seems to be just to evaluate the contributions and activities of the first and the third academies in Iran more fruitful both quantitatively and qualitatively than the endeavours of the second Iranian academy. The experiences which Iran has gained in the last eight decades could be relied on to move forward from a stage of language reform activities towards a more comprehensive phase of developing a language policy for the country in future.

7 citations