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Dissertation

Augmenting an improvised practice on the viola da gamba

01 Jun 2018-
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined their own improvisatory practice on the viola da gamba and its augmentation with mixed-music computer systems, and explored augmenting this practice with systems, looking in detail at my performances with gruntCount by Martin Parker, Laminate by myself and derivations by Ben Carey.
Abstract: This thesis examines my improvisatory practice on the viola da gamba and its augmentation with mixed-music computer systems. It comprises creative work and an extended written commentary and discussion. My creative work is presented in two albums of music – solo viola da gamba improvisation, and viola da gamba and mixed-music computer systems – and supplementary recorded material. The written commentary looks in depth at the presented creative work. I use the first, solo album to examine my improvisatory practice. To explore augmenting this practice with systems, I look in detail at my performances with gruntCount by Martin Parker, Laminate by myself and derivations by Ben Carey. Examples of these performances are presented in the second album. Scrutiny of these three systems leads to extended discussion of the following topics: 1. Taxonomy: What are these systems? What are the characteristics they display? Do these systems fit into a standard classification scheme? 2. Ontology: Do performances with these systems instantiate musical works? What are the criteria that would help us to decide? How much of my practice is therefore underpinned by musical works? 3. Copyright: Who is responsible for the musical output with these systems? Who is a legal/musical author in such performances? To conclude, I compare my improvisatory practice with and without systems and identify learnings arising from this research.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI

49 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Cass Cassidy and Einbond as discussed by the authors discuss the role of noise as musical material, as form, sound, notation or interface, as a medium for listening, as provocation, as data.
Abstract: Noise In and As Music Cassidy, Aaron and Einbond, Aaron (2013) Noise in and as music. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield. ISBN 978-1-86218-118-2 The book’s focus is the practice of noise and its relationship to music, and in particular the role of noise as musical material—as form, as sound, as notation or interface, as a medium for listening, as provocation, as data

5 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In early June, British diplomats had spent the past three months fretting over the Shackleton report and preparing for negotiations with Argentina as mentioned in this paper, and were suddenly presented with an opportunity to buy some much-needed time, and also allow officials to explain and put the gloss on the troublesome report.
Abstract: British diplomats had spent the past three months fretting over the Shackleton report and preparing for negotiations with Argentina. In early June they were suddenly presented with an opportunity. With ambassadorial relations not yet restored, John Shakespeare was still the FCO’s man in Buenos Aires. There, he was told by the MFA political director that the government was willing to hold official talks, as a prelude to a ministerial meeting. This offered two advantages for the Foreign Office. It would not only buy some much-needed time, but also allow officials to explain and ‘put the gloss’ on the troublesome report.1 Carless recommended accepting the offer for talks, scheduled for Paris. The MFA had proposed the French capital because it was sending a large delegation there for an Antarctic meeting. Following the government reshuffle in March, Tony Crosland had not found time to focus on the Falklands question. The shipbuilding nationalisation bill and Icelandic Cod War settlement had produced a climate in which the government was reluctant to take on another politically emotive problem.2 ‘Even if this is the month for grasping long outstanding nettles, I do not think we can afford to be stung too many times too quickly’, Rowlands advised the foreign secretary.3 As a result, Crosland told Shakespeare that the Paris talks should be ‘as informal and free-ranging as possible’. He sought an ‘across-the-board’ dialogue with Argentina, similar to those conducted with other Latin American countries. This would involve talks on regional security, fisheries development, oil, the Law of the Sea and nuclear non-proliferation. Crosland also suggested inviting the Argentine delegation to visit London after the discussions.4

2 citations

References
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Book
04 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The second edition of the second edition as mentioned in this paper was published in 2001 and is the most complete version of the first edition of this book. But it is not available in the third edition.
Abstract: Acknowledgements Preface to the second edition 1. Introduction: An Orchid in the Land of Technology 2. Live Performance in a Mediatized Culture 3. Tryin' To Make It Real: Live Performance, Simulation and the Discourse of Authenticity in Rock Culture 4. Legally Live: Law, Performance, Memory 5. Conclusion Bibliography Index

1,134 citations


"Augmenting an improvised practice o..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...Instead, I use copyright legislation and case law to afford another perspective on improvising with systems, an approach similar to that of Auslander (2008) in his consideration of liveness through copyright law....

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: Part One * Indian music (1) * Indian classical music (2) * Flamenco (3) * Baroque (4) * Organ (5) as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Part One * Indian music (1) * Indian music (2) * Flamenco Part Two * Baroque (1) * Baroque (2) * Organ (1) * Organ (2) Part Three * Rock * Audience * Jazz (1) * Jazz (2) * Jazz (2) Part Four * The Composer * The Composer and the Non-Improviser * The ComposerIn Practice (1) * The ComposerIn Practice (2) * The ComposerIn Question Part Five * Free * Joseph Holbrooke * The Music Improvisation Company * The MICThe Instrument * The MICRecording * Solo Part Six * Objections * Classroom Improvisation Part Seven * The Long Distance Improviser * Company * Limits and Freedom

576 citations


"Augmenting an improvised practice o..." refers background in this paper

  • ...My underlying style is ‘non-idiomatic’, like the free improvisation practiced by Bailey (1992)....

    [...]

  • ...Second, producing an (overly) detailed description of the sound on a second-by-second basis is not all that useful: detailing all the material a performer produces puts us in danger of overfitting, giving what Bailey called “only a more exact picture of the irrelevancies” (Bailey, 1992)....

    [...]

  • ...My underlying style is ‘non-idiomatic’, like the free improvisation practiced by Bailey (1992). My relationship with this style is somewhat problematic....

    [...]

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: MIRToolbox, an integrated set of functions written in Matlab, dedicated to the extraction from audio files of musical features related, among others, to timbre, tonality, rhythm or form, is presented.
Abstract: We present MIRToolbox, an integrated set of functions written in Matlab, dedicated to the extraction from audio files of musical features related, among others, to timbre, tonality, rhythm or form. The objective is to offer a state of the art of computational approaches in the area of Music Information Retrieval (MIR). The design is based on a modular framework: the different algorithms are decomposed into stages, formalized using a minimal set of elementary mechanisms, and integrating different variants proposed by alternative approaches — including new strategies we have developed —, that users can select and parametrize. These functions can adapt to a large area of objects as input.

387 citations


"Augmenting an improvised practice o..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...Using the MIRtoolbox (Lartillot et al., 2008; Mathworks, 2013), a summary root-mean-square energy value was computed once per second through the entire duration of the work....

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  • ...This is unsurprising, though, given the “so far unrefuted thesis that the overwhelming majority of computer music research and compositional activity locates itself (however unsteadily at times) within the belief systems and cultural practices of European concert music” (George Lewis (2000), remarking on Born (1995))....

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  • ...1) had in fact been achieved in performance, three specific audio analyses were carried out using readily available software: the MATLAB-based MIRtoolbox (Lartillot et al., 2008; Mathworks, 2013), and Sonic Visualiser (Sonic Visualiser, 2013)....

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Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this paper, Wishart takes a wide-ranging look at the new developments in music-making and musical aesthetics made possible by the advent of the computer and digital information processing.
Abstract: In this newly revised book On Sonic Art, Trevor Wishart takes a wide-ranging look at the new developments in music-making and musical aesthetics made possible by the advent of the computer and digital information processing. His emphasis is on musical rather than technical matters. Beginning with a critical analysis of the assumptions underlying the Western musical tradition and the traditional acoustic theories of Pythagoras and Helmholtz, he goes on to look in detail at such topics as the musical organization of complex sound-objects, using and manipulating representational sounds and the various dimensions of human and non-human utterance. In so doing, he seeks to learn lessons from areas (poetry and sound-poetry, film, sound effects and animal communication) not traditionally associated with the field of music.

347 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The author discusses his computer music composition, Voyager, which employs a computer-driven, interactive & virtual improvising orchestra that analyzes an improvisor's performance in real time, generating both complex responses to the musician's playing and independent behavior arising from the program's own internal processes.
Abstract: The author discusses his computer music composition, Voyager, which employs a computer-driven, interactive & “virtual improvising orchestra” that analyzes an improvisor's performance in real time, generating both complex responses to the musician's playing and independent behavior arising from the program's own internal processes. The author contends that notions about the nature and function of music are embedded in the structure of software-based music systems and that interactions with these systems tend to reveal characteristics of the community of thought and culture that produced them. Thus, Voyager is considered as a kind of computer music-making embodying African-American aesthetics and musical practices.

312 citations