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Book ChapterDOI

Authentication Protocol Using Error Correcting Codes and Cyclic Redundancy Check

20 Jun 2018-pp 874-882
TL;DR: An authentication protocol is proposed based on linear error correcting codes, pseudo random numbers and cyclic redundancy check function that can be incorporated within the framework of any communication system that uses linear error correction system to achieve reliability or implemented independently to achieve security in terms of authentication.
Abstract: Authenticating devices in communication system is an important and challenging task. With many diverse devices getting connected to communicate, establishing authentication of such devices among themselves (or with a central server) is essential to overcome possible attacks in the communication channel and by adversaries. In this paper, an authentication protocol is proposed based on linear error correcting codes, pseudo random numbers and cyclic redundancy check function. General protocol is provided in this paper and can be used for any specific linear error correcting codes defined over finite field. The proposed protocol is resistant against replay attack, man-in-the-middle and impersonation kind of attacks. One of the advantages of the proposed protocol is that it can be incorporated within the framework of any communication system that uses linear error correction system to achieve reliability or can be implemented independently to achieve security in terms of authentication.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This final installment of the paper considers the case where the signals or the messages or both are continuously variable, in contrast with the discrete nature assumed until now.
Abstract: In this final installment of the paper we consider the case where the signals or the messages or both are continuously variable, in contrast with the discrete nature assumed until now. To a considerable extent the continuous case can be obtained through a limiting process from the discrete case by dividing the continuum of messages and signals into a large but finite number of small regions and calculating the various parameters involved on a discrete basis. As the size of the regions is decreased these parameters in general approach as limits the proper values for the continuous case. There are, however, a few new effects that appear and also a general change of emphasis in the direction of specialization of the general results to particular cases.

65,425 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive review of the domain of physical layer security in multiuser wireless networks, with an overview of the foundations dating back to the pioneering work of Shannon and Wyner on information-theoretic security and observations on potential research directions in this area.
Abstract: This paper provides a comprehensive review of the domain of physical layer security in multiuser wireless networks. The essential premise of physical layer security is to enable the exchange of confidential messages over a wireless medium in the presence of unauthorized eavesdroppers, without relying on higher-layer encryption. This can be achieved primarily in two ways: without the need for a secret key by intelligently designing transmit coding strategies, or by exploiting the wireless communication medium to develop secret keys over public channels. The survey begins with an overview of the foundations dating back to the pioneering work of Shannon and Wyner on information-theoretic security. We then describe the evolution of secure transmission strategies from point-to-point channels to multiple-antenna systems, followed by generalizations to multiuser broadcast, multiple-access, interference, and relay networks. Secret-key generation and establishment protocols based on physical layer mechanisms are subsequently covered. Approaches for secrecy based on channel coding design are then examined, along with a description of inter-disciplinary approaches based on game theory and stochastic geometry. The associated problem of physical layer message authentication is also briefly introduced. The survey concludes with observations on potential research directions in this area.

1,294 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: This work aims to provide a context for Error Correcting Coding and to inspire a new generation of coders to tackle the challenge of Space-Time Coding.
Abstract: Preface. List of Program Files. List of Laboratory Exercises. List of Algorithms. List of Figures. List of Tables. List of Boxes. PART I: INTRODUCTION AND FOUNDATIONS. 1. A Context for Error Correcting Coding. PART II: BLOCK CODES. 2. Groups and Vector Spaces. 3. Linear Block Codes. 4. Cyclic Codes, Rings, and Polynomials. 5. Rudiments of Number Theory and Algebra. 6. BCH and Reed-Solomon Codes: Designer Cyclic Codes. 7. Alternate Decoding Algorithms for Reed-Solomon Codes. 8. Other Important Block Codes. 9. Bounds on Codes. 10. Bursty Channels, Interleavers, and Concatenation. 11. Soft-Decision Decoding Algorithms. PART III: CODES ON GRAPHS. 12. Convolution Codes. 13. Trefils Coded Modulation. PART IV: INTERATIVELY DECODED CODES. 14. Turbo Codes. 15. Low-Density Parity-Check Codes. 16. Decoding Algorithms on Graphs. PART V: SPACE-TIME CODING. 17. Fading Channels and Space-Time Coding. References. Index.

1,055 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This survey introduces the fundamental theories of PHy-security, covering confidentiality and authentication, and provides an overview on the state-of-the-art works on PHY-security technologies that can provide secure communications in wireless systems, along with the discussions on challenges and their proposed solutions.
Abstract: Physical layer security (PHY-security) takes the advantages of channel randomness nature of transmission media to achieve communication confidentiality and authentication. Wiretap coding and signal processing technologies are expected to play vital roles in this new security mechanism. PHY-security has attracted a lot of attention due to its unique features and the fact that our daily life relies heavily on wireless communications for sensitive and private information transmissions. Compared to conventional cryptography that works to ensure all involved entities to load proper and authenticated cryptographic information, PHY-security technologies perform security functions without considering about how those security protocols are executed. In other words, it does not require to implement any extra security schemes or algorithms on other layers above the physical layer. This survey introduces the fundamental theories of PHY-security, covering confidentiality and authentication, and provides an overview on the state-of-the-art works on PHY-security technologies that can provide secure communications in wireless systems, along with the discussions on challenges and their proposed solutions. Furthermore, at the end of this paper, the open issues are identified as our future research directions.

530 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive review of the physical layer security in multiuser wireless networks can be found in this article, where the authors provide an overview of the foundations dating back to Shannon and Wyner on information-theoretic security.
Abstract: This paper provides a comprehensive review of the domain of physical layer security in multiuser wireless networks. The essential premise of physical-layer security is to enable the exchange of confidential messages over a wireless medium in the presence of unauthorized eavesdroppers without relying on higher-layer encryption. This can be achieved primarily in two ways: without the need for a secret key by intelligently designing transmit coding strategies, or by exploiting the wireless communication medium to develop secret keys over public channels. The survey begins with an overview of the foundations dating back to the pioneering work of Shannon and Wyner on information-theoretic security. We then describe the evolution of secure transmission strategies from point-to-point channels to multiple-antenna systems, followed by generalizations to multiuser broadcast, multiple-access, interference, and relay networks. Secret-key generation and establishment protocols based on physical layer mechanisms are subsequently covered. Approaches for secrecy based on channel coding design are then examined, along with a description of inter-disciplinary approaches based on game theory and stochastic geometry. The associated problem of physical-layer message authentication is also introduced briefly. The survey concludes with observations on potential research directions in this area.

463 citations