scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Book ChapterDOI

Biodegradable Nanocomposites for Energy Harvesting, Self-healing, and Shape Memory

TL;DR: In this paper, the authors survey the rapidly expanding field of energy harvesting, self-healing, and shape-memory biodegradable composites by reviewing the major successful autonomic designs developed over the last decade.
Abstract: This review aims to survey the rapidly expanding field of energy harvesting, self-healing, and shape-memory biodegradable composites by reviewing the major successful autonomic designs developed over the last decade. We have discussed the characterization of the composite and dispersion of the filler by different methods such as grafting, chemical modifications. Also, we have highlighted the recent work on polymers and blends, hydrogels of biocomposites and their controllable approach for adjusting desired properties. In addition to above, the design considerations critical to the successful integration of these components in the commercial applications have been discussed. These materials have huge demand in the development of robust modeling and design tools based on a fundamental understanding of the complex and time-variant properties of the material and mechanization structure in diverse environments. The potential directions for future advancement in this field are also discussed.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article summarizes the significant progress in the field with a focus on the fabrication aspects of piezoelectric materials and shows great potential for fabricating smart stimulatory scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

193 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the influence of SWCNTs on the matrix of PU (3-dimensional network of soft and hard segments) was investigated to identify the enhancement of their physicochemical properties such as optical, electrical conductivity, thermal and mechanical properties.

16 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2004-Nature
TL;DR: New challenges and directions in biomaterials research are discussed, including synthetic replacements for biological tissues, designing materials for specific medical applications, and materials for new applications such as diagnostics and array technologies.
Abstract: Biomaterials have played an enormous role in the success of medical devices and drug delivery systems. We discuss here new challenges and directions in biomaterials research. These include synthetic replacements for biological tissues, designing materials for specific medical applications, and materials for new applications such as diagnostics and array technologies.

2,949 citations

PatentDOI
TL;DR: A very broad, additional spectrum of possible applications for intelligent polymers that covers an area from minimally invasive surgery, through high-performance textiles, up to self-repairing plastic components in every kind of transportation vehicles.
Abstract: Shape memory polymer compositions, articles of manufacture thereof, and methods of preparation and use thereof are described. The shape memory polymer compositions can hold more than one shape in memory. Suitable compositions include at least one hard segment and at least one soft segment. The Ttrans of the hard segment is preferably between -30 and 270 °C. At least one of the hard or soft segments can contain a cross-linkable group, and the segments can be linked by formation of an interpenetrating network or a semi-interpenetrating network, or by physical interactions of the blocks. Objects can be formed into a given shape at a temperature above the Ttrans of the hard segment, and cooled to a temperature below the Ttrans of the soft segment. If the object is subsequently formed into a second shape, the object can return to its original shape by heating the object above the Ttrans of the soft segment and below the Ttrans of the hard segment. The compositions can also include two soft segments which are linked via functional groups which are cleaved in response to application of light, electric field, magnetic field or ultrasound. The cleavage of these groups causes the object to return to its original shape.

2,837 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current review of 129 references describes the biological activity of several chitosan derivatives and the modes of action that have been postulated in the literature.

2,615 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
31 May 2002-Science
TL;DR: A group of degradable thermoplastic polymers that are able to change their shape after an increase in temperature enables bulky implants to be placed in the body through small incisions or to perform complex mechanical deformations automatically.
Abstract: The introduction of biodegradable implant materials as well as minimally invasive surgical procedures in medicine has substantially improved health care within the past few decades. This report describes a group of degradable thermoplastic polymers that are able to change their shape after an increase in temperature. Their shape-memory capability enables bulky implants to be placed in the body through small incisions or to perform complex mechanical deformations automatically. A smart degradable suture was created to illustrate the potential of these shape-memory thermoplastics in biomedical applications.

2,145 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
14 Apr 2005-Nature
TL;DR: Polymers containing cinnamic groups can be deformed and fixed into pre-determined shapes—such as elongated films and tubes, arches or spirals—by ultraviolet light illumination and can recover their original shape at ambient temperatures when exposed to ultraviolet light of a different wavelength.
Abstract: Materials are said to show a shape-memory effect if they can be deformed and fixed into a temporary shape, and recover their original, permanent shape only on exposure to an external stimulus. Shape-memory polymers have received increasing attention because of their scientific and technological significance. In principle, a thermally induced shape-memory effect can be activated by an increase in temperature (also obtained by heating on exposure to an electrical current or light illumination). Several papers have described light-induced changes in the shape of polymers and gels, such as contraction, bending or volume changes. Here we report that polymers containing cinnamic groups can be deformed and fixed into pre-determined shapes--such as (but not exclusively) elongated films and tubes, arches or spirals--by ultraviolet light illumination. These new shapes are stable for long time periods, even when heated to 50 degrees C, and they can recover their original shape at ambient temperatures when exposed to ultraviolet light of a different wavelength. The ability of polymers to form different pre-determined temporary shapes and subsequently recover their original shape at ambient temperatures by remote light activation could lead to a variety of potential medical and other applications.

1,807 citations