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Journal ArticleDOI

Black, Brown, or White? Color-Coding American Commercial Rice Cultivation with Slave Labor

01 Feb 2010-The American Historical Review (Oxford University Press)-Vol. 115, Iss: 1, pp 164-171
About: This article is published in The American Historical Review.The article was published on 2010-02-01. It has received 26 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: White (horse).
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For 2010 the bibliography of secondary writings published since 1900 in western European languages on slavery or the slave trade anywhere in the world: monographs, essays, reviews, etc. as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: For 2010 the bibliography continues its customary coverage of secondary writings published since 1900 in western European languages on slavery or the slave trade anywhere in the world: monographs, ...

110 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used a natural experiment in Indonesia to provide causal evidence on the role of location-specific human capital and skill transferability in shaping the spatial distribution of productivity.
Abstract: We use a natural experiment in Indonesia to provide causal evidence on the role of location-specific human capital and skill transferability in shaping the spatial distribution of productivity. From 1979‐ 1988, the Transmigration Program relocated two million migrants from rural Java and Bali to new rural settlements in the Outer Islands. Villages assigned migrants from regions with more similar agroclimatic endowments exhibit higher rice productivity and nighttime light intensity one to two decades later. We find some evidence of migrants’ adaptation to agroclimatic change. Overall, our results suggest that regional productivity differences may overstate the potential gains from migration.

102 citations


Cites background from "Black, Brown, or White? Color-Codin..."

  • ...Did social cohesion improve between Inner and Outer Islanders, and how is it affected by language and the degree of ethnic diversity? Finally, the empirical approach we develop in this paper can help inform an ongoing debate in American history concerning the role of African-born slaves’ location-specific (rice) farming skills in shaping agricultural development in the Americas (see Carney, 2001; Eltis et al., 2010)....

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Book
13 Sep 2010
TL;DR: From Africa to Brazil as discussed by the authors traces the flows of enslaved Africans from the broad region of Africa called Upper Guinea to Amazonia, Brazil and presents the only book-length examination of African slavery in Amazonia and identifies with precision the locations in Africa from where members of a large diaspora in the Americas hailed from Africa.
Abstract: From Africa to Brazil traces the flows of enslaved Africans from the broad region of Africa called Upper Guinea to Amazonia, Brazil These two regions, though separated by an ocean, were made one by a slave route Walter Hawthorne considers why planters in Amazonia wanted African slaves, why and how those sent to Amazonia were enslaved, and what their Middle Passage experience was like The book is also concerned with how Africans in diaspora shaped labor regimes, determined the nature of their family lives, and crafted religious beliefs that were similar to those they had known before enslavement It presents the only book-length examination of African slavery in Amazonia and identifies with precision the locations in Africa from where members of a large diaspora in the Americas hailed From Africa to Brazil also proposes new directions for scholarship focused on how immigrant groups created new or recreated old cultures

56 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines rice as a staple commodity, one that both reflected and generated inter-colonial dependencies in both ocean worlds, and how that dependency was ultimately fraught, focusing on rice that both directly linked the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds and highlighted some structural issues of colonialism, globalization, and food security.
Abstract: In this paper we are concerned with some issues of inter-colonial dependency, especially in food and with a focus on rice that both directly linked the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds and that highlight some structural issues of colonialism, globalization, and food security more generally. This paper examines rice as a staple commodity, one that both reflected and generated inter-colonial dependencies in both ocean worlds, and how that dependency was ultimately fraught. Because the rice trade did not operate in isolation, we also of necessity include some discussion of important non-food crops such as cotton and jute. In the Caribbean, to greater or lesser extents, the colonial plantation economies relied on imported rice and other foodstuffs, needs supplied by other “knots” in the web, especially in the Carolina low country. Other British colonial possessions, too, were developed as “rice bowls” critical to the sustenance of colonized peoples and the support of commercial crops. One of these newer servi...

20 citations

Book
01 Mar 2018
TL;DR: Vivian et al. as discussed by the authors examined the process that remade former sites of slave labor into places of leisure and explored the changing symbolism of plantations in Jim Crow-era America.
Abstract: In the era between the world wars, wealthy sportsmen and sportswomen created more than seventy large estates in the coastal region of South Carolina. By retaining select features from earlier periods and adding new buildings and landscapes, wealthy sporting enthusiasts created a new type of plantation. In the process, they changed the meaning of the word 'plantation', with profound implications for historical memory of slavery and contemporary views of the South. A New Plantation World is the first critical investigation of these 'sporting plantations'. By examining the process that remade former sites of slave labor into places of leisure, Daniel J. Vivian explores the changing symbolism of plantations in Jim Crow-era America.

18 citations