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Journal ArticleDOI

Book Review: Sense and Nonsense About Crime: A Policy Guide (2nd ed.)

01 May 1989-Criminal Justice Review (The College of Public and Urban Affairs, Georgia State UniversityAtlanta, Georgia 30303-3091)-Vol. 14, Iss: 1, pp 83-85
About: This article is published in Criminal Justice Review.The article was published on 1989-05-01. It has received 3 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Nonsense.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the potential impact of prison-based AIDS education programs by integrating data collected at a minimum-medium security institution in the Pennsylvania State Department of Correction and Community Services (PCS).
Abstract: This analysis examines the potential impact of prison-based AIDS education programs by integrating data collected at a minimum-medium security institution in the Pennsylvania State Department of Co...

11 citations

01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: A preliminary analysis of community oriented policing in Omaha is presented in this paper, where crime data and Omaha Conditions Surveys (OCS) from 1990 to 1994 were evaluated to determine if COP produced a change over time in crime and citizens' answers to questions about crime and the police.
Abstract: Community oriented policing (COP) has been adopted by a number of police departments throughout the country as a new policing philosophy. Some of the departments have implemented it in high crime areas and others have used it city-wide. The Omaha, Nebraska Police Department is currently in the process of implementing COP in the entire city. This has occurred gradually since 1989 when 15 officers were assigned to work in Omaha’s low-income housing developments. In 1990 these officers formed the Selective Patrol Unit and started practicing community oriented policing. A bicycle patrol was added in 1992 and COP expanded to other parts of Omaha with the Weed and Seed program. The city-wide implementation started in December 1993. This paper is a preliminary analysis of COP in Omaha. Crime data and Omaha Conditions Surveys (OCS) from 1990 to 1994 were evaluated to determine if COP produced a change over time in crime and citizens’ answers to questions about crime and the police. The Omaha sample for the survey questions came from the Metropolitan portion of the OCS. The North Omaha portion of the OCS was used to select residents who lived in and around the Omaha Housing Authority’s (O.H.A.) low-income housing developments where the Selective Patrol Unit worked. The surveys didn’t indicate if respondents lived in or around the housing developments. So the O.H.A. sample contained individuals in the same zip codes as the housing developments with incomes

2 citations

01 Jan 2000

2 citations


Cites background from "Book Review: Sense and Nonsense Abo..."

  • ...To address the “crime problem,” from a conservative point of view, one needs to arrest, prosecute and punish the criminal (Walker, 1989)....

    [...]

  • ...Liberals are known for their focus on rehabilitation rather than punishment (Walker, 1989)....

    [...]

  • ...“Once the appropriate descriptive work had been done, and the fraudulent and unde­ serving victim had been shooed away, what public figure could ever stand in the public and deny redress to the suffering and innocent victim of violence?” Weed (1995) responds to Christie’s work describing the ideal victim by developing the ideal villain/criminal....

    [...]

  • ...A number of observers have argued those recommendations catered to a conservative point of view (Carrington & Nicholson, 1989; Walker, 1989), though Stein and Young (personal communication, February 9, 2000) argue that Lois Haight Herrington actually wrote a less conservative report than was originally planned....

    [...]

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the potential impact of prison-based AIDS education programs by integrating data collected at a minimum-medium security institution in the Pennsylvania State Department of Correction and Community Services (PCS).
Abstract: This analysis examines the potential impact of prison-based AIDS education programs by integrating data collected at a minimum-medium security institution in the Pennsylvania State Department of Co...

11 citations

01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: A preliminary analysis of community oriented policing in Omaha is presented in this paper, where crime data and Omaha Conditions Surveys (OCS) from 1990 to 1994 were evaluated to determine if COP produced a change over time in crime and citizens' answers to questions about crime and the police.
Abstract: Community oriented policing (COP) has been adopted by a number of police departments throughout the country as a new policing philosophy. Some of the departments have implemented it in high crime areas and others have used it city-wide. The Omaha, Nebraska Police Department is currently in the process of implementing COP in the entire city. This has occurred gradually since 1989 when 15 officers were assigned to work in Omaha’s low-income housing developments. In 1990 these officers formed the Selective Patrol Unit and started practicing community oriented policing. A bicycle patrol was added in 1992 and COP expanded to other parts of Omaha with the Weed and Seed program. The city-wide implementation started in December 1993. This paper is a preliminary analysis of COP in Omaha. Crime data and Omaha Conditions Surveys (OCS) from 1990 to 1994 were evaluated to determine if COP produced a change over time in crime and citizens’ answers to questions about crime and the police. The Omaha sample for the survey questions came from the Metropolitan portion of the OCS. The North Omaha portion of the OCS was used to select residents who lived in and around the Omaha Housing Authority’s (O.H.A.) low-income housing developments where the Selective Patrol Unit worked. The surveys didn’t indicate if respondents lived in or around the housing developments. So the O.H.A. sample contained individuals in the same zip codes as the housing developments with incomes

2 citations