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Journal ArticleDOI

Book Review: The Gun in Politics: An Analysis of Irish Political Conflict, 1916-1986

01 May 1989-Criminal Justice Review (The College of Public and Urban Affairs, Georgia State UniversityAtlanta, Georgia 30303-3091)-Vol. 14, Iss: 1, pp 119-121
About: This article is published in Criminal Justice Review.The article was published on 1989-05-01. It has received 8 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Irish & Politics.
Citations
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Book
15 Apr 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyze current understanding of group learning and the factors that influence it and outline a framework that should be useful in present analytical efforts and for identifying areas requiring further study.
Abstract: Better ways are needed to understand how terrorist groups become more effective and dangerous. Learning is the link between what a group wants to do and its ability to actually do it; therefore, a better understanding of group learning might contribute to the design of better measures for combating terrorism. This study analyzes current understanding of group learning and the factors that influence it and outlines a framework that should be useful in present analytical efforts and for identifying areas requiring further study.

91 citations

01 Jan 2008

46 citations


Cites background from "Book Review: The Gun in Politics: A..."

  • ...Those Catholics who did join were also often targeted for assassination by republican paramilitaries, yet a number of Catholics did join the RUC (Bell 1987; Bew and Gillespie 1999)....

    [...]

  • ...213 an all-out offensive action against the British occupation system (Bell 1987)....

    [...]

  • ...and of allowing the violence to occur (Bell 1987; Dunnigan 1995)....

    [...]

  • ...In fact, the IRA was moribund, had few weapons, fewer members, negligible support, and was increasingly committed to non-violent politics, out of necessity if not disposition (Bell 1987)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the Provisional IRA's evolving attitude to the "problem" of Ulster unionism, and republicanism's various estimations of the likely efficacy of violence throughout the period.
Abstract: Analyses of the Provisional IRA in Northern Ireland tend to underplay the influence of political strategy in the 1970s, preferring to emphasise militarism. Similarly, the persistence of militarism in the 1980s is often obscured by the attention paid to a ‘new’ republican political orientation. This article seeks to draw attention to the IRA's evolving attitude to the ‘problem’ of Ulster unionism, and republicanism's various estimations of the likely efficacy of violence throughout the period. Republicanism is best understood as a deeply rooted working-class ethno-nationalist movement interacting closely with the other agents of the Northern Ireland conflict: constitutional nationalism, unionism and the British government. ‘Armed struggle’ became a declining asset for republicanism as it came to be seen less as a form of ‘popular guerrilla warfare’ and more as ‘terrorism’. 1

28 citations

01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: This article examined the relationship between the Irish, American, and British governments, the role of Irish Americans in shaping each government's policy, and the consequences of those policies in the postwar period.
Abstract: This dissertation looks at new evidence and asks new questions about Irish and Irish-American identity and U.S.-Irish relations from 1932 to 1945, especially during the critical years of World War II. It explores the relationship among the Irish, American, and British governments, the role of Irish Americans in shaping each government’s policy, and the consequences of those policies in the postwar period. Through extensive use of primary sources in Ireland and the United States, it builds on recent trends in the history of American foreign relations, contributes a fresh perspective to the relatively new field of Irish diplomatic history, exposes the myths surrounding Irish neutrality, and brings to light new evidence on the role of Irish Americans in shaping official diplomacy. The dissertation is divided into five chapters. The first chapter examines the IrishAmerican pattern of immigration, the history of Irish-American involvement in Irish nationalist groups prior to the outbreak of World War II, and subsequent efforts by the American, British, and Irish governments variously to control, discourage, or incite Irish Americans. The second chapter examines the context of the relationship between the U.S. and Irish governments from 1932, the year de Eamon de Valera took office as President of the Executive Council and Franklin Roosevelt was elected president, until the outbreak of the European war in September 1939. Chapter three examines the tense years from

19 citations

Book
10 Nov 2007
TL;DR: It is concluded that future network technologies modestly improve terrorist group efficiency, particularly for their supporting activities, but do not dramatically improve their attack operations.
Abstract: : Understanding how terrorists conduct successful operations is critical to countering them Terrorist organizations use a wide range of network technologies as they plan and stage attacks This book explores the role that these communications and computer technologies play and the net effect of their use, the purpose and manner in which the technology is used, the operational actions of terrorists and possible responses of security forces The authors conclude that future network technologies modestly improve terrorist group efficiency, particularly for their supporting activities, but do not dramatically improve their attack operations Precluding terrorists from getting the technology they want is impractical; developing direct counters is unlikely to yield high payoffs Instead, exploiting the technologies and the information such technologies use to enable more direct security force operations are more promising options

19 citations

References
More filters
Book
15 Apr 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyze current understanding of group learning and the factors that influence it and outline a framework that should be useful in present analytical efforts and for identifying areas requiring further study.
Abstract: Better ways are needed to understand how terrorist groups become more effective and dangerous. Learning is the link between what a group wants to do and its ability to actually do it; therefore, a better understanding of group learning might contribute to the design of better measures for combating terrorism. This study analyzes current understanding of group learning and the factors that influence it and outlines a framework that should be useful in present analytical efforts and for identifying areas requiring further study.

91 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the Provisional IRA's evolving attitude to the "problem" of Ulster unionism, and republicanism's various estimations of the likely efficacy of violence throughout the period.
Abstract: Analyses of the Provisional IRA in Northern Ireland tend to underplay the influence of political strategy in the 1970s, preferring to emphasise militarism. Similarly, the persistence of militarism in the 1980s is often obscured by the attention paid to a ‘new’ republican political orientation. This article seeks to draw attention to the IRA's evolving attitude to the ‘problem’ of Ulster unionism, and republicanism's various estimations of the likely efficacy of violence throughout the period. Republicanism is best understood as a deeply rooted working-class ethno-nationalist movement interacting closely with the other agents of the Northern Ireland conflict: constitutional nationalism, unionism and the British government. ‘Armed struggle’ became a declining asset for republicanism as it came to be seen less as a form of ‘popular guerrilla warfare’ and more as ‘terrorism’. 1

28 citations

01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: This article examined the relationship between the Irish, American, and British governments, the role of Irish Americans in shaping each government's policy, and the consequences of those policies in the postwar period.
Abstract: This dissertation looks at new evidence and asks new questions about Irish and Irish-American identity and U.S.-Irish relations from 1932 to 1945, especially during the critical years of World War II. It explores the relationship among the Irish, American, and British governments, the role of Irish Americans in shaping each government’s policy, and the consequences of those policies in the postwar period. Through extensive use of primary sources in Ireland and the United States, it builds on recent trends in the history of American foreign relations, contributes a fresh perspective to the relatively new field of Irish diplomatic history, exposes the myths surrounding Irish neutrality, and brings to light new evidence on the role of Irish Americans in shaping official diplomacy. The dissertation is divided into five chapters. The first chapter examines the IrishAmerican pattern of immigration, the history of Irish-American involvement in Irish nationalist groups prior to the outbreak of World War II, and subsequent efforts by the American, British, and Irish governments variously to control, discourage, or incite Irish Americans. The second chapter examines the context of the relationship between the U.S. and Irish governments from 1932, the year de Eamon de Valera took office as President of the Executive Council and Franklin Roosevelt was elected president, until the outbreak of the European war in September 1939. Chapter three examines the tense years from

19 citations

Book
10 Nov 2007
TL;DR: It is concluded that future network technologies modestly improve terrorist group efficiency, particularly for their supporting activities, but do not dramatically improve their attack operations.
Abstract: : Understanding how terrorists conduct successful operations is critical to countering them Terrorist organizations use a wide range of network technologies as they plan and stage attacks This book explores the role that these communications and computer technologies play and the net effect of their use, the purpose and manner in which the technology is used, the operational actions of terrorists and possible responses of security forces The authors conclude that future network technologies modestly improve terrorist group efficiency, particularly for their supporting activities, but do not dramatically improve their attack operations Precluding terrorists from getting the technology they want is impractical; developing direct counters is unlikely to yield high payoffs Instead, exploiting the technologies and the information such technologies use to enable more direct security force operations are more promising options

19 citations