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Journal ArticleDOI

Boundaries and Territoriality in South Asia: From Historical Comparisons to Theoretical Considerations

01 Apr 2008-International Studies (SAGE Publications)-Vol. 45, Iss: 2, pp 105-132
TL;DR: The authors examines the theoretical salience of territoriality, particularly in South Asia, by comparing the histories of the region's three most contentious boundaries (Durand, McMahon and Radcliffe lines).
Abstract: This article examines the theoretical salience of territoriality, particularly in South Asia, by comparing the histories of the region's three most contentious boundaries—Durand, McMahon and Radcliffe lines. It argues that four distinct avenues are central to theoretical considerations on territoriality in South Asia: the role of liberalism in colonial construction of state; international and domestic dimensions of geopolitics; disruptions in demographic and cultural contiguities produced by the boundaries; and the nature of sovereignty resulting from the experience of colonialism. Traditional lenses for studying boundaries and territoriality offer limited analytical purchase. The article posits that critical geopolitics and history-intensive approaches allow a better grasp of material and discursive dimensions of territoriality. Such an eclectic consideration is especially suitable for studying territoriality in South Asia given the region's cross-border complexities, both real and symbolic.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

541 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Tony Porter1
TL;DR: Kahler and Walter as discussed by the authors studied the relationship between territorial conflict and globalization in an era of globalization and found that conflicts over territory seemed ready to fade into history, but such predictions were far too optimistic.
Abstract: Territoriality and Conflict in an Era of Globalization, Miles Kahler and Barbara F. Walter, eds., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp. xii, 340.Not that long ago, amidst exuberance about the ability of globalization to erase borders, conflicts over territory seemed ready to fade into history. Now, with daily reminders from Iraq and elsewhere, it is evident that such predictions were far too optimistic. So how should we best understand the relationship between territorial conflict and globalization? This is the question that this book seeks to address.

74 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of India's China War by Neville Maxwell can be found at the Monthly Review website as mentioned in this paper, where most recent articles are published in full.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the monthly review website.
Abstract: Review of India's China War by Neville Maxwell.This article can also be found at the Monthly Review website, where most recent articles are published in full.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.

35 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1983
TL;DR: In this paper, Anderson examines the creation and global spread of the 'imagined communities' of nationality and explores the processes that created these communities: the territorialisation of religious faiths, the decline of antique kingship, the interaction between capitalism and print, the development of vernacular languages-of-state, and changing conceptions of time.
Abstract: What makes people love and die for nations, as well as hate and kill in their name? While many studies have been written on nationalist political movements, the sense of nationality - the personal and cultural feeling of belonging to the nation - has not received proportionate attention. In this widely acclaimed work, Benedict Anderson examines the creation and global spread of the 'imagined communities' of nationality. Anderson explores the processes that created these communities: the territorialisation of religious faiths, the decline of antique kingship, the interaction between capitalism and print, the development of vernacular languages-of-state, and changing conceptions of time. He shows how an originary nationalism born in the Americas was modularly adopted by popular movements in Europe, by the imperialist powers, and by the anti-imperialist resistances in Asia and Africa. This revised edition includes two new chapters, one of which discusses the complex role of the colonialist state's mindset in the development of Third World nationalism, while the other analyses the processes by which all over the world, nations came to imagine themselves as old.

25,018 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations


"Boundaries and Territoriality in So..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Benedict Anderson (1991) has offered three such strategies through which colonialism helped forge imagined communities or nations: drawing of accurate Maps, conducting periodical Censuses, and establishing Museums....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the emergence of multiperspectival institutional forms is identified as a key dimension of the condition of postmodernity in international politics and suggests some ways in which that exploration might proceed.
Abstract: The concept of territoriality has been studied surprisingly little by students of international politics. Yet, territoriality most distinctively defines modernity in international politics, and changes in few other factors can so powerfully transform the modern world polity. This article seeks to frame the study of the possible transformation of modern territoriality by examining how that system of relations was instituted in the first place. The historical analysis suggests that “unbundled” territoriality is a useful terrain for exploring the condition of postmodernity in international politics and suggests some ways in which that exploration might proceed. The emergence of multiperspectival institutional forms is identified as a key dimension of the condition of postmodernity in international politics.

1,906 citations

Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: This book discusses constitutional structures and new States in the Nineteenth Century, as well as theories of Institutions and International Politics, and concludes that not all states are created equal.
Abstract: Acknowledgments ix CHAPTER ONE Sovereignty and Its Discontents 3 CHAPTER TWO Theories of Institutions and International Politics 43 CHAPTER THREE Rulers and Ruled: Minority Rights 73 CHAPTER FOUR Rulers and Ruled: Human Rights 105 CHAPTER FIVE Sovereign Lending 127 CHAPTER SIX Constitutional Structures and New States in the Nineteenth Century 152 CHAPTER SEVEN Constitutional Structures and New States after 1945 184 CHAPTER EIGHT Conclusion: Not a Game of Chess 220 References 239 Index 255

1,784 citations

Book
31 Oct 1986
TL;DR: The meaning of territoriality and its meaning in the American territorial system are discussed in this article, where the authors propose a model of the United States as a society, territory, and space.
Abstract: Introduction 1. The meaning of territoriality 2. Theory 3. Historical models: territoriality, space, and time 4. The church 5. The American territorial system 6. The work place 7. Conclusion: society, territory, and space Indices.

1,012 citations


"Boundaries and Territoriality in So..." refers background in this paper

  • ...In the first, we find territoriality actively participating in efficient classification International Studies 45, 2 (2008): 105–32 by geographical area (‘ours’ from ‘yours’, for example), that is, in reference to spatial location (Sack 1986: 32)....

    [...]