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Journal ArticleDOI

Breaking the Silence that Silences: A time of challenge and change in Aboriginal/police relations, the 1960s and 1970s

01 Jul 1995-Current Issues in Criminal Justice (Informa UK Limited)-Vol. 7, Iss: 1, pp 44-59
TL;DR: The Break the Silence that Silences: A time of challenge and change in Aboriginal/police relations, the 1960s and 1970s as mentioned in this paper was a seminal work in the field of criminal justice.
Abstract: (1995). Breaking the Silence that Silences: A time of challenge and change in Aboriginal/police relations, the 1960s and 1970s. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 44-59.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
Kathy Lothian1
TL;DR: In this article, a brief narrative outline of the Black Panther Party's international influence is provided. But it does not address the role of the international influence of the party in the United States.
Abstract: This article contributes to recent scholarship that has sought to investigate the international influence of the Black Panther Party. It does this by providing a brief narrative outline of the Aust...

25 citations

Book
29 Jun 2015
TL;DR: The right to be human - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and human rights - is a black thing as discussed by the authors, as defined by Tom Calma in his book "The Right to be Human: Reconciliation: the nation's history".
Abstract: Foreword Tom Calma Contributors Acknowledgements 1 History Steve Kinnane 2 Reconciliation: the nation's history Paul Newman 3 Law and native title Asmi Wood 4 Overkill, over time: the criminalisation of Aboriginal society - or genocide by stealth John Williams-Mozley 5 Art Fabri Blacklock 6 Literature Sandra R Phillips 7 Enterprise and entrepreneurial thinking: it's a black thing! Dennis Foley 8 Health and wellbeing Raelene Ward 9 Midwifery Karel Williams 10 Education Jessa Rogers 11 Good sports: representations of Aborigines in Australian sports Barry Judd 12 The right to be human - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and human rights Gary Thomas Index

8 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1969
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss a research project which sought, as its principal aim, to establish objectively and authoritatively both what the Australasian public think of the police and what the police think about the public.
Abstract: INTRODUCTION Commentators on the Antipodean way of life have long identified a strong anti-authoritarian trait among Australians and New Zealanders. It is an attitude which perhaps first came under the notice of the outside world during the course of the two World Wars when Australians, and to a lesser extent New Zealanders, gained the reputation of having little respect for military symbols of authority. Within Australia, anti-authoritarian attitudes have more recently been said to account for the average citizen's view of "the police as enemies, army officers as traitors to democracy... the boss as a barely necessary evil and anyone who gives an order as deeply suspect".Because of the Australian's hostility towards those in power over him, it has been claimed that "relations between the police and the public are probably worse in Australia than anywhere else in the world".2 No evidence has been provided to support this sweeping statement, but it is a view quite frequently expressed in Australia, and, in the case of police-public relations in New Zealand, in that country as well. This book discusses a research project which sought, as its principal aim, to establish objectively and authoritatively both what the Australasian public think of the police and what the police think about the public. It begins by looking at the important stages in the development of the Australian and New Zealand police forces with particular reference to placing in historical perspective many of the present-day problems confronting police, and in particular, the problem of establishing good relations with the public. The remaining chapters of the book discuss the results of surveys carried out by the authors on police-public relations and suggest methods of improving relations between the two groups. General police organization and working conditions are also discussed when they bear on the problem of police-public relations and police efficiency. This book is largely the result of data generated from very substantial surveys carried out among citizens and the police in Australia and New Zealand. Because such a large part of the book is taken up with material gathered from thousands of interviews, it is important at this stage to mention the conceptual framework followed by the authors in conducting the surveys…….

26 citations